will v8's be enough?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    will v8's be enough?

    I have a set of hayes hfx9's, which are totally fine; they've got a fresh bleed, fresh pads, and they're adjusted nice and tight on the rotors. So i don't really want to buy another set of brakes. My only beef with them is that i tend to cook them on long steep downhills (ie braille for you norcallers); I''m a beefy dude at 6'3 and 230lbs shaved and naked. My bike came with a 7" front and a 6" rear, and although i've tried sintered pads, i don't really care for them since they fade eventually anyway and the modulation isn't that good. So i'm thinking that 8x8 might be the way to go. I guess there's no good way to answer, but is the jump from 7 in the front to 8 bigger than 6 -> 7? Does anyone have personal experience fading 7s that the 8 fixed? Shoot, i dunno, i just don't wanna spend 50 bucks and still be running out of brake.
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  2. #2
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    Try an 8 up front, 7 in the rear. Only have to buy one rotor (the V8) and two adapters (V8 front/V7 rear). Might cost about $40 or so.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenLightGo
    Try an 8 up front, 7 in the rear. Only have to buy one rotor (the V8) and two adapters (V8 front/V7 rear). Might cost about $40 or so.
    that's not a bad idea, but i'd rather have matched sized brakes. With the set up with one bigger than the other, in an 'oh ****' slow, i grab both brakes about the same amount, so i get a heaping helping of front brake. (it was really bad with sintered front pads) I don't remember having this problem with rim brakes of the 6x6 set up i had on my last bike, so im blaming the rotors.
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  4. #4
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    The HFX-9's are your main problem. Replace the masters with the HFX-MAG's huge difference in brake performance & modulation. As suggested earlier, 8" front & 7" rear rotors. The G2 calipers are awesome but replace the pads with Galfers. You will now have a sweet brake setup.

    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/149...e-Pads-Red.htm
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  5. #5
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    i just bought new pads and bled my brakes though... kind of a waste of 30$... and i loathe bleeding hayes.
    I haven't had any issue with the 9's, setting them up right seems to be pretty critical though.

    I guess i mean... if theres 2 ways to arrive at the same result... non fading/glazing/screaming brakes, i'd rather not do work and spend money twice.

    Wouldn't the end results be pretty much the same?

    If im looking at new masters, is there a hayes option that allows for pad contact adjustment?
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg
    i just bought new pads and bled my brakes though... kind of a waste of 30$... and i loathe bleeding hayes.
    I haven't had any issue with the 9's, setting them up right seems to be pretty critical though.

    I guess i mean... if theres 2 ways to arrive at the same result... non fading/glazing/screaming brakes, i'd rather not do work and spend money twice.

    Wouldn't the end results be pretty much the same?

    If im looking at new masters, is there a hayes option that allows for pad contact adjustment?
    To answer your question,
    "how will changing my masters stop me from glazing the crap out of my pads?"

    The masters will not resolve this problem. This is caused from dragging the brakes instead of pulsing them.

    Going to a 8" front & 7" rear will help especially when combined with Galfer semi metallic pads. If your happy with the 9's then stay happy.
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  7. #7
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    I went to a V8 front on my machine (6' 235 lb at present) and it has done quite well. I don;t know about braille, but I do a lot of river valley riding and had problems with overheating and fading with the stock set up. With the V8 on the front and stock V6 rear, I'm able to nose wheely at will and do the longer descents without baking anything.

    It worked for me, but YMMV.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg
    that's not a bad idea, but i'd rather have matched sized brakes. With the set up with one bigger than the other, in an 'oh ****' slow, i grab both brakes about the same amount, so i get a heaping helping of front brake. (it was really bad with sintered front pads) I don't remember having this problem with rim brakes of the 6x6 set up i had on my last bike, so im blaming the rotors.

    When you grab both brakes hard, you are front biased anyway b/c of inertia. V7 is plenty big for the rear - another reason to stick with the V7 is frame clearance. You may not have enough room on the chainstays to fit a V8 before it starts curving back to the BB junction.

    I've got HFX-9s as well - about a year old, running V7 front/V6 rear and weigh 210-215ish.

    Tell me more about the painful bleed process? It's about time I bleed mine.
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  9. #9
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    1) Only one solution! 8x8 and you will never have a problem with stopping or overheating. Not sure its possible to have too powerful brakes.

    2) Try hope brakes! Has anyone noticed how you bleed car brakes, motorbike brakes, etc... No silly syringes in sight! So why does someone think its a great idea or am i being a little cynical and its all a con to make you spend 30 on a bleeding kit rather than a bit of tissue paper..

    Hopes are powerful and super quick to bleed. No need for any other manufacturer! Come on peeps at Hayes Formula Magura et all. Try some Moto V2s and feel ashamed. (Apart from Gustavs)
    Gert Steamin DH Badger

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenLightGo
    When you grab both brakes hard, you are front biased anyway b/c of inertia. V7 is plenty big for the rear - another reason to stick with the V7 is frame clearance. You may not have enough room on the chainstays to fit a V8 before it starts curving back to the BB junction.

    I've got HFX-9s as well - about a year old, running V7 front/V6 rear and weigh 210-215ish.

    Tell me more about the painful bleed process? It's about time I bleed mine.

    basically the problem is that you have to bleed them backwards. You hook up a squeezie bottle to the caliper that has a hose to the bleed screw and squeeze the bottle to push fluid up through the master. The hose that comes in the bleed kit is too short to comfortably reach the lever while squeezing the bottle. The other problem is that the hose doesn't like to stay on the bleed screw, and pops off when you move around to grab tools or squeeze the lever. Next time i'm going to buy a long length of hose from a pet shop and glue it into the lid of the bottle so the hose reaches the bottom of the bottle, so i can hold the bottle right side up as i squeeze from the comfort of the handlebar area. Actually, screw that, I'm gonna pick up somma them LX 25$ calipers and 50$ levers from jenson. The shimano stuff feels a little better and is massively easier to bleed.

    I used the bleed kit, but im not sure its worth the 30$. You could use a little squeezie bottle, buy a hose from a pet shop, and dot4 brake fluid to approximate the kit. The only unique thing is the fitting that goes in the master cyl hole for the fluid to come out of, which a coffee stirrer straw could probably approximate. I betcha that set up would work better than the kit.


    I've got a hardtail... i gotta believe that there'd be loads of clearance.
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  11. #11
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    Yes, 8x8 is the way to go. I'm 215lbs, and had 6x6 on my first disc bike (~2001), then went 8x6, then 8x8. For big guys and long downhills, you need the extra metal of the big 8 inch rotor to handle the extra heat. If you still get rear brake fade, work on using more front brake and not dragging your rear brake.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg
    I've got a hardtail... i gotta believe that there'd be loads of clearance.
    Syringe works wonderfull.

    Check out WiLL
    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    I've got a set of J7s you can have for 145 for both.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg
    I've got a hardtail... i gotta believe that there'd be loads of clearance.
    Me too - there wasn't much clearance with the 185mm I originally had on the rear. If you get some frame flex with a 203mm, it'll hit the chainstay.
    Happiness depends more on the inward disposition of mind than on outward circumstances. Benjamin Franklin

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenLightGo
    Me too - there wasn't much clearance with the 185mm I originally had on the rear. If you get some frame flex with a 203mm, it'll hit the chainstay.

    hmm... maybe i better toss my front rotor in the back and check...
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  15. #15
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    couldn't hurt
    Happiness depends more on the inward disposition of mind than on outward circumstances. Benjamin Franklin

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