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Thread: TRP dash

  1. #1
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    TRP dash

    Anyone tried these? Trp makes some nice cyclocross brakes....

    https://www.trpbrakes.com/category.p...1018&catid=184
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  2. #2
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    The TRP Carbon Dash - brake was in the current issue of Mountain Bike 12/10 (released in Germany) has been judged satisfactory. Would advise against this brake.
    Regards Torsten

  3. #3
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    Those are Tektro's high end brakes. They incorporate carbon and some nice designs for a nicer look and higher cost.

    Tektro makes some nice XC/Light trail brakes. I have a few customers that absolutely love their Tektro Auriga Pro for XC riding. Plenty of stopping power and some nice adjustment features on them.

    I'd probably wouldn't use them for anything more than XC/Trail application. Freeride/All Mountain/DH would definitely tax these brakes.

  4. #4
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    I'm surprised we don't hear about them more around here (on mtbr). Never even seen those before. They look nice.

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    Ok, the price was right and i got a pair of these shortly after i asked about them. I've run them on my freeride hardtail and my 140mm trailbike since then and feel by now i can give them an honest review. I'm in my 20s, 6'3, and 240lbs, plus or minus. I put them on coming from several sets of j5/7s, and have run a variety of hayes/shimano/avid brakes. I've only run them with 203/160 rotors, cuz little rotors are for little people. In other words, midgets.

    These are obviously taking aim at shimano xtr; they use the same pad, same size piston, same level of manufacturing quality, hydraulic fluid, bleed process, and prolly similar weights, although i don't care and didn't check. As far as weight goes, the bulk of the lack of bulk comes from the feathery rotors. I never used the rotors, mine came with a dinky 180.

    Set up was super easy; although i used the avid caliper brackets and rotors, I didn't need to eyeball it to get them right like you always have to with cheap/sticky/avid brakes. I'd imagine a similar experience with their rotors and brackets if your **** is faced. One of my brakes came with a bit of air in the lines, so, lacking a manual, i easily pressure bled it from the bottom with a syringe. After that I never had to readjust anything that wasn't my fault. The single bolt clamp is fast, and the wide clamp means you can run the bolt pretty loose to let your levers spin in a crash and still have good clamping torque. I've broken the clamp on hayes and avid levers, and replacement was a 12$ part, i'd imagine you have to replace the whole master cylinder with the TRP brakes though.

    Riding them, I've been totally happy with them in this application. In the hayes-avid-shimano spectrum of feel, they're like elixirs, although i think this can be adjusted with the carbon model. There's a perceptible 'clunk-grab' feel when the pads engage, but then the power ramps up smoothly with lever travel. They feel very precise, you use them an think 'oooh, this is what good manufacturing tolerances are like.' On my freeride hardtail i didn't have quite enough power on the steepest stuff, but that bike is 90% front brake and i'm a fatso, so it's acceptable. On the trailbike they have more power than i can use. I don't think anyone under 200lbs would be disappointed with the power. As far as stroke adjustment and lever shape, there's no stroke adjustment and i don't miss it (like i did with j5's) and the lever shape got along with me, although hayes 9 hd levers are the only ones i've ever disliked.

    The only big gripe is the stupid reach adjust knobs. They tag the top tube on my trailbike, they spin too easily, they look really dumb, and they're in the path for fall damage. One of mine is chipped, the other one got tweaked in a fall and is very very tight to adjust now (which i actually like, it doesn't move accidentally). The rubber grippy part looks like it's gonna fall apart, and it's probably worthless, but it hasn't been a problem. I guess the defense is that it's branded as an XC brake, and you could adjust the reach on the fly, and other brands have similar stupid adjustment knobs, but... oh well. I would rather have a allen key adjustment flush with the lever.


    Ok, i've kinda blathered on, but there's absolutely no information on them, so now there's something. You're welcome, internet.
    Last edited by scottzg; 05-06-2011 at 03:12 AM.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  6. #6
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    TRP = Tektro Racing Products.
    My only experience with them is I use their ML930 levers with Avid BB7s on my mountain bike, and their XL950 levers on my flat bar road bike, and the quality and attention to detail is totally superb, second to none. Don't be put off by the lower priced products Tektro turn out, TRP stuff is different.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg
    Ok, the price was right and i got a pair of these shortly after i asked about them. I've run them on my freeride hardtail and my 140mm trailbike since then and feel by now i can give them an honest review. I'm in my 20s, 6'3, and 240lbs, plus or minus. I put them on coming from several sets of j5/7s, and have run a variety of hayes/shimano/avid brakes. I've only run them with 203/160 rotors, cuz little rotors are for little people. In other words, midgets.

    These are obviously taking aim at shimano xtr; they use the same pad, same size piston, same level of manufacturing quality, hydraulic fluid, bleed process, and prolly similar weights, although i don't care and didn't check. As far as weight goes, the bulk of the lack of bulk comes from the feathery rotors. I never used the rotors, mine came with a dinky 180.

    Set up was super easy; although i used the avid caliper brackets and rotors, I didn't need to eyeball it to get them right like you always have to with cheap/sticky/avid brakes. I'd imagine a similar experience with their rotors and brackets if your **** is faced. One of my brakes came with a bit of air in the lines, so, lacking a manual, i easily pressure bled it from the bottom with a syringe. After that I never had to readjust anything that wasn't my fault. The single bolt clamp is fast, and the wide clamp means you can run the bolt pretty loose to let your levers spin in a crash and still have good clamping torque. I've broken the clamp on hayes and avid levers, and replacement was a 12$ part, i'd imagine you have to replace the whole master cylinder with the TRP brakes though.

    Riding them, I've been totally happy with them in this application. In the hayes-avid-shimano spectrum of feel, they're like elixirs, although i think this can be adjusted with the carbon model. There's a perceptible 'clunk-grab' feel when the pads engage, but then the power ramps up smoothly with lever travel. They feel very precise, you use them an think 'oooh, this is what good manufacturing tolerances are like.' On my freeride hardtail i didn't have quite enough power on the steepest stuff, but that bike is 90% front brake and i'm a fatso, so it's acceptable. On the trailbike they have more power than i can use. I don't think anyone under 200lbs would be disappointed with the power. As far as stroke adjustment and lever shape, there's no stroke adjustment and i don't miss it (like i did with j5's) and the lever shape got along with me, although hayes 9 hd levers are the only ones i've ever disliked.

    The only big gripe is the stupid reach adjust knobs. They tag the top tube on my trailbike, they spin too easily, they look really dumb, and they're in the path for fall damage. One of mine is chipped, the other one got tweaked in a fall and is very very tight to adjust now (which i actually like, it doesn't move accidentally). The rubber grippy part looks like it's gonna fall apart, and it's probably worthless, but it hasn't been a problem. I guess the defense is that it's branded as an XC brake, and you could adjust the reach on the fly, and other brands have similar stupid adjustment knobs, but... oh well. I would rather have a allen key adjustment flush with the lever.


    Ok, i've kinda blathered on, but there's absolutely no information on them, so now there's something. You're welcome, internet.


    So what you are saying is that for the average joe trail rider, they are a good option.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc
    So what you are saying is that for the average joe trail rider, they are a good option.
    Yeah. They work very well, are easy to service, and feel great, despite having some weird design elements and having a parent company that is not well regarded in the mtb world. I like them a lot more than i expected to.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  9. #9
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    Idea! Are you still using these model brakes?

    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    Ok, the price was right and i got a pair of these shortly after i asked about them. I've run them on my freeride hardtail and my 140mm trailbike since then and feel by now i can give them an honest review. I'm in my 20s, 6'3, and 240lbs, plus or minus. I put them on coming from several sets of j5/7s, and have run a variety of hayes/shimano/avid brakes. I've only run them with 203/160 rotors, cuz little rotors are for little people. In other words, midgets.

    These are obviously taking aim at shimano xtr; they use the same pad, same size piston, same level of manufacturing quality, hydraulic fluid, bleed process, and prolly similar weights, although i don't care and didn't check. As far as weight goes, the bulk of the lack of bulk comes from the feathery rotors. I never used the rotors, mine came with a dinky 180.

    Set up was super easy; although i used the avid caliper brackets and rotors, I didn't need to eyeball it to get them right like you always have to with cheap/sticky/avid brakes. I'd imagine a similar experience with their rotors and brackets if your **** is faced. One of my brakes came with a bit of air in the lines, so, lacking a manual, i easily pressure bled it from the bottom with a syringe. After that I never had to readjust anything that wasn't my fault. The single bolt clamp is fast, and the wide clamp means you can run the bolt pretty loose to let your levers spin in a crash and still have good clamping torque. I've broken the clamp on hayes and avid levers, and replacement was a 12$ part, i'd imagine you have to replace the whole master cylinder with the TRP brakes though.

    Riding them, I've been totally happy with them in this application. In the hayes-avid-shimano spectrum of feel, they're like elixirs, although i think this can be adjusted with the carbon model. There's a perceptible 'clunk-grab' feel when the pads engage, but then the power ramps up smoothly with lever travel. They feel very precise, you use them an think 'oooh, this is what good manufacturing tolerances are like.' On my freeride hardtail i didn't have quite enough power on the steepest stuff, but that bike is 90% front brake and i'm a fatso, so it's acceptable. On the trailbike they have more power than i can use. I don't think anyone under 200lbs would be disappointed with the power. As far as stroke adjustment and lever shape, there's no stroke adjustment and i don't miss it (like i did with j5's) and the lever shape got along with me, although hayes 9 hd levers are the only ones i've ever disliked.

    The only big gripe is the stupid reach adjust knobs. They tag the top tube on my trailbike, they spin too easily, they look really dumb, and they're in the path for fall damage. One of mine is chipped, the other one got tweaked in a fall and is very very tight to adjust now (which i actually like, it doesn't move accidentally). The rubber grippy part looks like it's gonna fall apart, and it's probably worthless, but it hasn't been a problem. I guess the defense is that it's branded as an XC brake, and you could adjust the reach on the fly, and other brands have similar stupid adjustment knobs, but... oh well. I would rather have a allen key adjustment flush with the lever.


    Ok, i've kinda blathered on, but there's absolutely no information on them, so now there's something. You're welcome, internet.
    Are you still using these model brakes and how have they performed over time?

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