titanium disc rotors here- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    titanium disc rotors here

    From the makers of Airborne's titanium frames....

    http://www.xacd.com.cn/disk.htm

    Just passing along the info. Don't shoot the messenger.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by danK
    From the makers of Airborne's titanium frames....

    http://www.xacd.com.cn/disk.htm

    Just passing along the info. Don't shoot the messenger.
    Why would anyone want ti rotors, is there a pad compound that now works

  3. #3
    the Truth will set u free
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    LOL, nice Engrish there...

    Quote Originally Posted by danK
    From the makers of Airborne's titanium frames....

    http://www.xacd.com.cn/disk.htm

    Just passing along the info. Don't shoot the messenger.
    LOL, nice Engrish there:

    Surpassing and Challenging the Utmost Limit!

    Ti rotors, no thanks.
    2001 Ellsworth Truth

  4. #4
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    New question here. Frame tubes, bolts, dropouts, bars, posts, hell maybe even campware...

    ...but rotors? This is one venture Jamie at Airborne may have been better off steering clear of, esp when you consider his market niche is mainly those looking for affordable bikes. In offering so many rotor sizes, they can't be that cheap. The main thing though as implied already, is that Ti is too darn slick to work well with most pads, unless you use something that is very abrasive. I don't even believe in Ti cassette cogs or chainrings myself, and I am a former Airborne owner. Ti used in high wear areas doesn't make much sense to me. As far as I can determine through some searching, Ti scrap is bought at just over $2.40 per pound, and sold at just over $3.40 per pound. Since rotors weigh only about 1/4 - 1/3 even in steel, this can make for alot of dumping of precious metals. Most consumers aren't all that recycling conscious, and it's hard to get them all to change their ways. Some industries could help by not producing disposable goods out of rare and /or toxic materials.
    Last edited by Gnarlygig; 01-30-2004 at 09:31 PM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gnarlygig
    .... Some industries could help by not producing disposable goods out of rare and /or toxic materials.


    The last time I checked, Titanium is one of the most abundant metals on Earth's crust.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biandon


    The last time I checked, Titanium is one of the most abundant metals on Earth's crust.
    .... its just flaming expensive to do anything with!

  7. #7
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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    the problem with Ti rotors is the material doesn't conduct heat that well. Has nothing to do with friction between the pad and the rotor, abrasiveness of the surface, etc. Its all about the heat.

    Ti 6/4 for example has a thermal conductivity of 46.5 BTU-in/hr-ft-F while for 416 stainless steel its 173 BTU-in/hr-ft-F, or almost 4 times as much, and with 7075T6 aluminium, its 902 BTU-in/hr-ft-F (over 5 times that of 416 stainless and nearly 20 times that of Ti 6/4).

    The higher the conductivty, the better the material is going to conduct the heat generated by the brake pads, away from the pads and the calipers (and oil if its a hydraulic caliper). Overheating the pads will cause them to glaze over and the brakes to squeal like a banshee (and braking performance to suffer).

  8. #8
    theHeadlessThompsonGunner
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    Yes...

    it's the fifth most common. AND, one of the hardest metals to get into elemental form. ie, if you could build a bike with sand (titanium OXIDE, and some silica flour), you'd be good to go. It requires extensive rifinement, at the cost of manpower and -worse- environment. It requires scores of energy that would go around ten times as far for steel or aluminum. AND...it has to be worked in an inert environment (typically argon), or it oxidizes....and you're back to sand.

    The moral? Shoot eco-hippy-Boulder-Nazis who think they're doing their part on Ti bikes. What's so wrong with steel? Goddam sissies need to learn to pedal harder.

    That said, I don't know how it would work for brake rotors. But again, doesn't steel work just fine?
    "I've courted brain damage like some courtesan of darkness."


    -The Good Doctor

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