TiNi Coating- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: TiNi Coating

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    28

    TiNi Coating

    hey guys i bought the alligator wind cutter rotor with the TiNi coating but ended up buying a different colour bike so the gold rotor wont look that good on it, so i was wondering what the best way is to get it off and make it a shiny silver. will easy off work???i know i can buy them silver too but it would be easier for me to try to get the coating off.

    Thanks in advance,

    Heres a link to the rotor:

    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/171...ated-Rotor.htm

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Tzvia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    144
    I would not mess with them. They are cheap enough that I would just buy them if it bothered me enough. The gold color looks good with anything imo. I would still be using mine if they worked well with my new Martas (08s).

  3. #3
    Old man on a bike
    Reputation: Bikinfoolferlife's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    12,383
    Well, for something so important as color coordination, you need to get some good chrome plated rotors, will definitely look better. Work so well, who knows? Not that that initial coating was worth much in the first place other than color coordination...
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1,236
    TiNi is stupid for brakes... did you know that they use it on high end motorcycle forks because it's slippery as fock?

    I've heard that it wears off of the braking surface fairly quickly
    Quote Originally Posted by Dictatorsaurus
    The way I see it right now, if my bike is too heavy, then I'm too weak!

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by AlexJK
    TiNi is stupid for brakes... did you know that they use it on high end motorcycle forks because it's slippery as fock?

    I've heard that it wears off of the braking surface fairly quickly

    yea a friend of mine bought them and it wore off where the pads hit when u brake. thats also another reason why i want all silver...

  6. #6
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    17,508
    Quote Originally Posted by AlexJK
    TiNi is stupid for brakes... did you know that they use it on high end motorcycle forks because it's slippery as fock?

    I've heard that it wears off of the braking surface fairly quickly
    Actually it's more to harden and protect surfaces... as well as for aesthetics. Not so much because it's slippery...

    That said... not a great surface for a rotor.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1,236
    while that is true, i'm pretty sure that it's more for the slick properties. In MX, TiNi's slick properties are one of the most hyped things about suspension. I rode a KTM RC125 up at laguna seca earlier this year. It had an ohlins fork with the TiNi coating... that thing had ZERO stiction, none, zip, nada, nil... NO STICTION AT ALL!

    It was WAY beyond smooth...

    whatever... who cares, this is about is stupid use on brake rotors
    Quote Originally Posted by Dictatorsaurus
    The way I see it right now, if my bike is too heavy, then I'm too weak!

  8. #8
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    17,508
    Quote Originally Posted by AlexJK
    while that is true, i'm pretty sure that it's more for the slick properties. In MX, TiNi's slick properties are one of the most hyped things about suspension. I rode a KTM RC125 up at laguna seca earlier this year. It had an ohlins fork with the TiNi coating... that thing had ZERO stiction, none, zip, nada, nil... NO STICTION AT ALL!

    It was WAY beyond smooth...

    whatever... who cares, this is about is stupid use on brake rotors
    Well, I am sure that it's used for improving surface hardness and to protect sliding or cutting surfaces. It's like hard anodizing stanchions. It makes it hard, slickness... not as much. It could help preserve the smoothness of the surface so that it does not become pitted or gouged. It's also used on knives and drill bits in order to preserve and protect the cutting edges.

    Low amount of stiction could be from a number of other things... But it is impossible for there to be no stiction at all. With the exception of a perfect ideal environment, there will always be some threshold of force parallel to the surface of contact in order to overcome static cohesion.

    The fork could be using teflon bushings, it could be using some fort of stanchion treatment, it could be produced to close tolerances that do not cause binding. Any of these factors, and many more could account for the smooth fork.

    Coefficient of friction for Ti Nitride is .4 to .9 against itself (dry).
    Steel on steel (dry) falls between that range.
    Chrome has a lower coefficient of friction than Ti Nitride.

    Anybody I've talked to on motorcycles with Ti Nitride or DLC says it's more for show than for go.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.