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  1. #1
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    Speed Dial 7 Durability

    Apparently this is an issue. I had gone OTB once downhill, which left a minimal (barely visible) bend in the tip of my right lever blade (landed on dirt). However, today I had a stupid (first time clipless on the trail) fall. Bike landed reasonably gently on a rock and snapped the tip right off the lever blade. Of course crash damage isn't covered by warranty

  2. #2
    Old man on a bike
    Reputation: Bikinfoolferlife's Avatar
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    That isn't a warranty issue. The durability of the lever is fine if you don't smash it into things.
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

  3. #3
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    I would have expected it to bend, not snap. It was a clean snap, kinda like a twig. Either way, I'm out $13+shipping just for learning clipless pedals... Guess that's Murphy talking.

  4. #4
    ride like you stole it
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    Did you bend the lever back? doing that with most metals will make it weaker. I've had a similar issue where I've bent the lever and now its really wobbly and loose.
    I lubed my disc brakes because they squeaked.
    Man was that fun to work out

  5. #5
    LDH
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    don't tighten the perch so tight so lever will rotate in a fall.

  6. #6
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    I hadn't bent it back after the first incident, as the bend was barely noticeable, and actually made the lever slightly more comfy. The lever perch isn't tight, but this fall was sideways, so it hit square onto the end of the lever blade (against a rock) so it just snapped off. Slowed down to pick a line, couldn't decide and fell trying to unclip (going to slow).

  7. #7
    Old man on a bike
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    Yeah, I'd think that the first hit stressed it second hit finished it. I had a similar experience FWIW, after the first hit it was fine, altho felt a little odd since it wasn't same as the other lever anymore, got a few more months out of it then took another hit and it snapped off. You just gotta chalk it up to the stuff you'll go thru on a mountain bike.
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

  8. #8
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    Stuff happens. Just be glad it wasn't a Shimano lever, which would have exploded into shards in that situtation. Just kidding, but the 7 levers are verrry good brake levers and very durable, based on years of use by many people. The parts are also replaceable...keep that in mind.

  9. #9
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    Yeah. At least it was only a $13 lever. Too bad Avid doesn't sell new lever blades (only new whole levers) for the 08s unless you get the Speed Dial Ultimate. Then again, it probably would have saved me $2.

  10. #10
    surfer w/out waves
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    I believe most levers blades are designed to snap to prevent damage to the housing... don't over tighten to the bars... levers should be able to rotate on the bars upon impact.
    "Listen, strange women lyin' in ponds distributin' swords is no basis for a system of government!..." -- Dennis the Peasant

  11. #11
    narCOTIC
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    straitline do some real good replacement blades

  12. #12
    Never trust a fart
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    Last Monday I took out a 3 inch diameter sapling with a direct hit on the front brake lever - yes I'm using the SD 7's - doing around 15 mph down hill. Zero effect on the brake lever. If it were not for the bar end I would have kept going. The bar end brought me to a stop. lol

  13. #13
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    After snapping a Shimano XL lever on an unplanned OTB experience during a standing climb, I switched to Avid levers because they offered consumer-direct replacement part service for little things like lever blades, and because they designed what they called a "bend zone" into the base of the lever blade to encourage bending, not breakage, so the bike could be limped home (and the blade replaced, not bent back).

    Unfortunately, SRAM didn't pick up Avid's most excellent customer service (though they are improving -- but they don't deal consumer-direct, and as already pointed out by comptiger5000, they don't list replacement blades 'cept for the Ultimates).

    But this is a rough and tumble sport and shit breaks. Thankfully, the SD-series levers are relatively inexpensive to replace.
    speedub.nate
    MTBR Hiatus UFN

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc
    Last Monday I took out a 3 inch diameter sapling with a direct hit on the front brake lever - yes I'm using the SD 7's - doing around 15 mph down hill. Zero effect on the brake lever. If it were not for the bar end I would have kept going. The bar end brought me to a stop. lol
    That was a direct hit, correct? Mine only hit the end, so it couldn't be absorbed by the bend zone (darn) and was concentrated on probably the weakest part of the lever (bend right at the tip).

  15. #15
    Never trust a fart
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    Yeah, a direct hit.

    Yours failed due to the Murphy factor.

    What can go wrong, will go wrong. lol

  16. #16
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    Of course. Murphy dictates that when falling, something will hit a rock. Out of my 2 falls that day, 1 ended in me hitting a rock, the other in a brake lever hitting a rock. 1 week of road must not have been as much clipless experience as I thought. Going faster (road) gives more time between when you stop pedaling and have to be unclipped before you stop.

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