Odd LBS advice or was it?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Digital Toast
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    Odd LBS advice or was it?

    I just helped my GF's son buy his first real Mtn.Bike with a bit of his high school graduation money. A Raleigh Talus 5.0. The first week he had it we took it out and rode it pretty hard 3-4 times. We are planning a weekend ride in the mountains so I wanted him to get it a little broke in. My GF was heading back to the same town as the LBS(LBS for me is 80-140 miles away). The mech that was at the LBS talking to us said to bring it back and let him retune it a bit before we went. So she took it back in to them. Upon arrival she took the bike out of the back of her Explorer and then put the front wheel on. One of the employees saw this and was in utter amazement that we had taken the wheels off. She rushed out and stopped my GF and told her that the mech's would put the wheels back on. That the disc brakes are very fragile and can be broken very easily if you don't put everything back in just right. When she showed up to pick the bike up after adjustment they told her that if he kept taking the wheels off there was a good chance that the brake pads would get broken and not work properly. They also said he'd have to adjust them every time he puts the wheel back on so the pad wouldn't rub, because removing the wheel messes with the alignment on the brake pads. So they came out and helped her load the bike up with all the wheels intact. I was a little shocked to hear all this new disc brake knowledge. I hadn't ever heard anything like this. For years I've been rather carelessly slapping my Magura Louise front disc equip wheel back in place with no problems. All my friends doing the same with multiple other brands.

    I know his bike isn't the top of the line and the brakes were probably made by the lowest bidder, but still. I don't think there as fragile as they lead on. When he bought the bike he knew he'd be upgrading stuff here and there in a year or later. I'd told my GF and her son that this bike would be much better then a Walmart bike. So when the LBS started telling her about all the disc brake stuff she was a little put off. So my question is this. Has anyone had any experience with low end Promax brakes? Model number is : Promax DSK7-20. Is there any sort of truth in what there saying?

    tanx

    Zero

  2. #2
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    well, if you throw the wheel in crooked? yeah brakes will need to be adjusted.
    if you throw the wheel in and chip the rotor against the brake pads HARD? yeah could chip or grind off a bit of the pad prematurely.
    but the brakes don't re-adjust themselves, unless the rotor is out and someone pulls on the brake lever and moves the pads out.
    (or the lever gets pressed by something in the back of the truck)

    as long as care is being taken to get the wheel in and seated properly in the dropouts the rotor ends up in the same place relative to the brake pads as before. so no problem.
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  3. #3
    ...idios...
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    If the QR/bolt tension is different after the wheel has been refitted then the caliper/rotor may ne to be realigned to get the rotor running plumb through the middle of the caliper (pads) again. You can also just loosen the QR/bolts and try to match the tension you had when the aligment was OK. This is simple with QR and you should be able to get your technique with just a little practice.

    Another problem with hydraulic disc brakes is that the pistons (and pads) can be extended if the lever is pulled when the rotor is not between the pads. This can easily be fixed by using a thin tyre lever or a flathead screwdriver to gently push the pads apart.

    All this talk of fragility and easily broken pads is total and utter nonsense. If I were in your position, I'd speak with the wrench involved and set him straight; and always make sure that he never got his hands on the bike again.

    What use is a philosopher who doesn't hurt anybody's feelings? -
    Diogenes


  4. #4
    bi-winning
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    I have a mechanical disc brake setup. I do find that when I remove the wheel, and then replace it, the disc alignment is different. I need to rotate the axle to a certain position to get the rotor centred between the pads.
    Perhaps my axle has the slightest of bends (low end Shimano hub) but for whatever reason, that's the way it is.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  5. #5
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    Sounds like odd advise, indeed. Unless they were being rough and clumsy, it sounds to me like the woman at the LBS is an example of how confidence in a small amount of poorly understood information can be worse than no information at all. Those pads need to grab a fast-spinning rotor, repeatedly. Like byknuts said, side impacts can cause a chip, but your shop folks definitely exaggerated their fragility. Do they deal much with MTB (I doubt that they were simply concerned about the quality of Promax vs something higher end)?

    About the adjustment, like everyone else here has mentioned, it can be a trick to get the realignment just right after removing and reinstalling a wheel. Trial and error with the QR, or, and upgrade even to BB7s will allow easy fine tuning at the caliper.

    I agree, you should set the shop folks straight, or at least ask them why the high drama version of what should be minor caution. Keep in mind that the shop folks feel like they're the ones who have the expert advise, so it may not go anywhere useful, depending on how you raise it with them.

  6. #6
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    Taking the wheel off and on won't do anything to the brake pads or brake set-up...

    In fact most people take the front of when transporting the bike...

    Put it back togeather with even the smallest amount of intelligence is easy....

    The LBS is a weirdo....He shoudl have helped the women learn how to do it the right way.

  7. #7
    Digital Toast
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    Thanks everyone. I was pretty sure things hadn't changed that much since I threw my Louise Magura on my Dekerf. I just wanted to double check. When we bought the bike, they seemed pretty knowledgeable at the shop. Plus....this is one of a couple bike shops in a 120mile radius from where I live in Nebraska. They do deal with Mtn.Bikes which is what surprised me.

    Should I see if they can bleed my HS33's???

    Just kidding....

    Thanks again.

    Zero

  8. #8
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    I bet Thule and Yakima would disagree strongly with that LBS. A little care is all that's needed when taking the wheel off and on.

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