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Thread: holes in rotor.

  1. #1
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    holes in rotor.

    Ok so I have tried to find out what the diiference in the hole in the rotors are. I like the ones with less material and bigger holes. What the difference in performance with the ones with smaller holes or barely any holes? Im building a wheelset and I like the looks of the hope saw blade but Im not an expert on these. my other choice would be like a Avid clean sweep. what to do, what to do. Thanks for your input
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    Holes are mainly for reducing weight. They also help to churn up the air and increase cooling. On the downside, they reduce the amount of material for the pads to grab, and reducing the rotor mass reduces the amount of metal to absorb heat (heat sink).

    In general, the light ones with big holes work fine, so the disadvantages aren't much to be concerned about, but I have read some people claim decreased stopping power of super light rotors.

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    Another factor to consider is what caliper you'll be using . . .

  4. #4
    namagomi
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    They're just speed holes... The more holes on the rotor the faster you go!!

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    I think larger holes wear pads faster.

    jx

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    ^ They probably do. They'll create more scraping on the pad surface and clean the pads as they wear, also clearing any brake dust from the surface and preventing glazing. Like rubbing cheese against a grater vs a piece of sheet metal.
    Last edited by Tim-H; 07-18-2011 at 09:28 PM.

  7. #7
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    I see. I don't want anything super light. I just wasn't sure if the ones with larger holes would decrease stopping power. There are just so many voices. What do you guys run?
    60% of the time ......it works all the time

  8. #8
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    I have G2 rear G3 front. There's a point where you'll see diminishing returns and even negative impact on braking performance. I wouldn't run a solid rotor, like the roundagon. It would heat up way too much and not clean the pads well enough.

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    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve View Post
    Holes are mainly for reducing weight. They also help to churn up the air and increase cooling. On the downside, they reduce the amount of material for the pads to grab, and reducing the rotor mass reduces the amount of metal to absorb heat (heat sink).

    In general, the light ones with big holes work fine, so the disadvantages aren't much to be concerned about, but I have read some people claim decreased stopping power of super light rotors.
    they do reduce the amount of disc rotor for the pads to grab on initial contact. but they provide more friction for the pads to slow the rotor down which in turn slows the bike down.

    the disadvantage of the drilled holes and slots in bike brakes is that the weaken the rotor strength so they will be susceptible to warping or bending. if you had a heavy object like a car brake disc, this would be more of an issue as you will be able to feel it in the pedal. also, on a car, drilled rotors can crack due to the immense pressure from the calipers and the heat created from the weight of the car. bicycles are much lighter and you are not on the brakes for as long as in a car so heat is not as much as an issue. (motorcycles are the same. hence why none of them have ceramic discs.)

  10. #10
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    Other than roundagons which are mostly solid, pretty much all rotors are drilled and or slotted, so I don't know exactly what the OP is trying to decide. If you look at a bunch of different rotors, I don't think you can tell by looking at them which ones will work the best. There are some superlight rotors, like Aishima, that have so little brake surface you have to wonder how well they will work. I've read mixed reviews on those type. Your basic Avid, Hayes, Hope, Formula, etc probably have some performance differences between them, but they are probably small, and I don't know how you could predict anything about them without head to head testing.

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