Hayes Stroker Trail Front Brake help- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    18

    Hayes Stroker Trail Front Brake help

    I guess I should start with the back story, so here goes. I let a friend borrow my bike for a couple of weeks. Apparently he let it sit outside for the time he had it. I get the bike back and every thing that can rust has rusted. Friend agrees to fix the bike because hes an idiot. The biggest problem that has occured is that the front brake lever will not release once it is actuated. Im pretty familiar with automotive brake systems, and usually this type of thing will happen when the calipers need to be rebuilt.

    So I call around to a few local shops, and find one that seems to know what theyre talking about (one shop didnt even know that bikes came with hydraulic brakes but I cant be too surprised, I live at the beach and probably 95% of all of the shops cater to roadies and beach cruisers) Anyways, the shop agrees to take a look at it, and I leave the bike with them. I get the call from the shop that the lever and caliper are both in good shape and that the problem was that the adjuster wheel was rusted to the point that it was preventing the lever from releasing all the way, so they cleaned it up with a wire wheel/brush and viola the brakes are working.

    So I go to pick up the bike and take it for a test ride. The front brakes now work, but not very well. The rear brake stops the bike better than the front, which shouldnt happen. So I go back inside and ask them if they can try bleeding the caliper one more time just to make sure theres not any air bubbles. So the mechanic puts the bike on the stand, and bleeds the brake. By bleeding the brake I mean that he hooks a syringe up to the fluid reservoir while holding the lever down with a strap. He then applied pressure to the syringe and opened the bleeder screw which sent brake fluid all over the floor and the caliper.

    So I asked him how he knows that all of the air is out of the system, and he proceeds to tell me that since the master cylinder is fully compressed, and the system is sealed (which it wasnt because they just used some generic fitting on the reservoir that wasnt air tight.) I know he basically doesnt know what hes doing at this point. So we test ride again and still the front brake sucks. It barely stops on the road, I dont even want to know how it would do in the woods.

    The mechanic then realizes that maybe when he sprayed the shop down with DOT4 that he contaminated my pads, so he throws a new set of pads on for me and sands the rotor. Brakes still suck so we collectively agree to take the bike with me, and ride around the neighborhood for a few days to bed the pads and see if there is any improvement. Its been a week now, and Ive probably put 20 miles on the bike and there is very little improvement.

    I know that the brakes need to be properly bled, but Im not 100% convinced this is the problem. I used to race cars and I know what brakes feel like when there is air in the system, and this doesnt feel like it. The front and rear levers both feel the same except that the rear brakes actually have some bite.

    Does anyone have any other suggestions?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    6,762

    Well you really didn't mention....

    what he used to clean the rotor. Yeah the pads needed to be replaced, and the dork at the shop deffinately used the wrong method for bleeding the brakes. However, at the shop I work at there is a DEFFINATE procedure for cleaning brake fluid off of a rotor. 1. Wipe down the rotor with a clean alcohol soaked rag. 2. Lightly sand the rotor braking track with fine grit sand paprer to remove all traces of old pad material as this material can retain brake fluid. So unless it is removed the rotor is still contaminated. 3. Clean again with alcohol. 4. Remount the rotor and then clean again with alcohol to remove any accidental finger prints. You now have a rotor that you KNOW isn't contaminated.

    I would suggest two things to you. Replace the pads again. If the rotors weren't properly cleaned to begin with, the current pads were likely contaminated by any residual fluid. But before you try to use the brakes, clean the rotor as above. From there simply bed the rotor in and you should be back to normal. And while your at it I would check the pistons and the rest of the caliper over carefully. Make sure the pistons are moving in unison and making contact with the rotor at the same time. You'd be amazed at how much power a sticky piston can rob you of.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    18
    He used some simple green spray to clean the brake fluid off, then hit the rotors with "plumbers sandpaper" Now that I think about it though he then put the old pads back in and I rode around on it for a few minutes before the new pads went on so I guess its possible that the new pads are now contaminated.

    I think Im just going to order a new rotor, and new pads, rebleed the brake and see what happens.

    It looks like a caliper rebuild kit (which appears to include a new piston, seals and bleeder screw) is relatively cheap so maybe Ill do that too. The procedure doesnt look too much different than it was on a car.

    Is there a reason I cant bleed the brakes like a car? Basically I was going to hook a tube up to the bleed screw, and use the MC to move the fluid through the system. The instructions from hayes say to use a squeeze bottle to move fluid from the caliper to the reservoir.

    Thanks for the help!

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    38
    A problem with some Hayes Stroker Trails is that they used a piston that is too large for the cylinder. I've had this problem with both front and back. After a while the lever would not retract back to its correct position, and I had to push the levers out with my fingers. I emailed Hayes about the problem and they sent me a kit to replace the pistons. It was fairly easy and it worked. But I had to bleed the brakes afterward. Some people can do the job and don't have to bleed the brakes. Hayes also said I could send them the brakes and they would do the work. Hayes stands behind their product.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.