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  1. #1
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    Grinding rims(help please)

    i have a feeling no one here is going to know what im talking about , but....

    im wanting to grind my rims down for powerful braking. is there any secrets or tips i should know?
    ive done what i thought would be considered a light grind, but theres no difference. theyre
    still quiet too. im using a simple electric drill.

    im thinking maybee a dremel or bench grinder?

    any help is apreciated.

    xx-this is a trials thing in case your just wondering......
    Peace Love Bicycles

  2. #2
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    Dremel should do it...you just need to find the right bit/tip/whatever...

  3. #3
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by scaryguy137
    i have a feeling no one here is going to know what im talking about , but....

    im wanting to grind my rims down for powerful braking. is there any secrets or tips i should know?
    ive done what i thought would be considered a light grind, but theres no difference. theyre
    still quiet too. im using a simple electric drill.

    im thinking maybee a dremel or bench grinder?

    any help is apreciated.

    xx-this is a trials thing in case your just wondering......
    What did you use in the drill? Stone, drum, disk?
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  4. #4
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    a 4 inch abrasive wheel. i think. im sorry im not familiar with those terms.
    apparently, im using the wrong grade. what should i be using here?

    thanks again
    Peace Love Bicycles

  5. #5
    wants a taco
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    what we use at our shop is just an angle grinder with the standard abrasive disc. If you put the wheel in a frame you can just hold it against the rim and the rim will rotate for you leaving a nice uniform grind...just dont go too far with it.

    I know you said this is a trials thing, just making sure you are using it on a trials bike because normal braking with smooth out the grind pretty quick, its really only works for on off braking like trials. Even then on our trials bikes we make sure to only use the front brake when riding to wherever we want to play to keep from smoothing out the grind.

  6. #6
    Meh.
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    There used to be this rim-tar stuff... rub it on the rims and the pads just grab.

    But a abrasive disc should work just fine.

  7. #7
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    Check out your local auto parts store for 3M Roloc Scotch Brite discs. They leave and excellent braking finish without removing too much material. Make two passes in opposite directions for a cross hatch pattern and hang on to your bars the first time you hit your brakes!

  8. #8
    wants a taco
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlurredVision
    Check out your local auto parts store for 3M Roloc Scotch Brite discs. They leave and excellent braking finish without removing too much material. Make two passes in opposite directions for a cross hatch pattern and hang on to your bars the first time you hit your brakes!
    scotch brite doesnt really get deep enough to give that true on off braking that a grinder could do. awesome to get rid of anodization though

    oh yea, assuming this is a trials bike, throw some plazmatic brake pads on there and you will have an on off switch as a brake

  9. #9
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    The scotch brites discs work great with a die grinder or other rotory tool. I use em on my bike rims as well as automotive brake rotors, flywheels etc. Grinding wheels work but are too easy to take off too much.

  10. #10
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    A 4" angle grinder.

    www.observedtrials.net All your rim grinding questions will be answered there.





  11. #11
    just along for the ride
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    Use steel wool, start medium grit then go as fine as you want, I'd avoid a grinder, one mistake and your wheel is toast.

  12. #12
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    Whatever tool or abrasive you end up using, is going to give you a far more homogeneous finish if you have the wheel spinning, just place the whole bike on the stand or even flip it upside down and spin the wheels at a pretty high rate, that way the passes of the grind are distributed very evenly .

    My favorite tool for the job is a 4.5" grinder with a "Flapper wheel" (flexible sanding disk with a bunch of small flaps,l plus they come in many grids) with the grinder you can even "Cross hatch" depending in how you orient, rotate and spin the grinder.

    Also in the old days we used to apply "valve Lapping compound" to the rims with excellent results, well except when was wet.

  13. #13
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    I wouldn't remove any material from a rim; you're just shortening its life. Use a Scotchbrite pad (if you must). Acetone is good for removing gunk from the rims.

  14. #14
    Devolution is real!
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    http://www.trials-forum.co.uk/forum

    Do a search for grinding rims on that site. A 4" angle grinder works great. Alway keep the grinder moving and don't hold it on one spot on the rim.

    Don't use standard MTB pads with a grind. They don't work nearly as good as trials specific pads. www.trialspads.com

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