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Thread: Formula RX

  1. #1
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    Formula RX

    Hi all,

    Got a pair of the new RX brakes... they seem really nice. Rims will be arriving shortly, so I'll get a chance to actually ride them sometime next week, hopefully. Reports to come.





    The levers have a really nice feel to them. Even right out of the box, nice and crisp.




    Got to shorten up the hoses some; we'll see how easy they are to bleed... going to wait on that until I get the bars that I'm actually going to run.


    In my excitement to play with them, forgot to get weights. I'll try to get them pulled and weighed soon.

    Eric

  2. #2
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    Damn, considering that they are the "entry level" hyrdos they are really trick looking.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renovatio
    Damn, considering that they are the "entry level" hyrdos they are really trick looking.

    Yeah, but consider that they are "entry level" for Formula. Entry level Italian made brakes that go for ~$180-$200 per wheel depending on rotor choice. That's getting close to Elixer CR/Stroker Gram territory.


    I got impatient and put them on my other bike. Even straight out of the box, no bedding, no nothing, they feel awesome. They feel as good (to me), have nearly as much power, and modulate better than my dialed Juicy 7's. I've ridden a friend's Elixer CR's and I'm thinking these are going to end up being nicer. I'm going for a ride tomorrow and I should have a good feel for how they'll break in.

    I've had a couple sets of J7's, BB7's, XT's (m760 and 770), HFX-9's, and ridden a bunch of others (except Formula and not much from Magura). I've done Juicy 3's briefly and then Hope Mono Mini's on my wife's bike. If these get as much better with bedding and break in as all my other discs have, they will be amazing. They're not as good yet as the wife's Hopes, but other than that they're easily as good as any other brake I've ever run.

    I've always been able to set up my brakes well; never any of the turkey warble out of my juicy's, always quiet (except in the wet), but these were a breeze to install. No monkeying with CPS washers, easy to see space between the rotor and pads, easily the fastest/easiest set up I've had in a long time. Also, they look awesome with XTR shift pods.
    Last edited by eric1115; 11-07-2009 at 03:06 PM.

  4. #4
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    Those look amazing on your bike.
    Did you get a chance to play with them some more or get the actual weights yet?
    Just impatient and curious, heh.

    These are brakes I've been looking at for a near future purchase along with the Elixir CR and CR mag.

  5. #5
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    I got a ride in on Sunday, and the brakes were great. They are definitely a different feel than I'm used to. They are 180 rotors f/r; I've always run 160's so that may be part of it. They feel like they bite harder at initial pad contact than the Juicy's or XT's for me. Plenty of power (the trail I rode Sunday isn't really one that gives brakes a good workout, but they still felt like they had lots more stopping power with a lighter lever pull). I haven't begun to scratch the surface of fade resistance, so I can't comment on that at all. I never get my Juicy's anywhere near hot enough to fade on the short ups and downs in the river valleys around here.

    There was a bit of warble out of the rear brake after the creek crossing; it took a little longer than the front to quiet back down, and was generally a little more apt to sing here and there. I'm thinking that either there's a bit more flex in the rear IS mount on the HiFi than in the Fox post mount and coupled with a 180 rotor that allowed some caliper movement, or that customers have been drooling on and/or touching the rear rotor and getting a bit of oil on the rotor/pads. I'll investigate further and get back on that.

    Lever feel is still awesome; it got better with a good ride (as expected). Light, crisp, and firm. Also, the lever blades themselves are super comfy. I'm thinking I'll move them inboard of the shifters and run them set up for mostly one finger braking.

    Does anyone have any specific questions on them?

    Eric

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    Yes,

    How is the modulation on those. I currently have the Juicy 5s and there is no real modulation to speak of. The blades are kind of sloppy as well. This would be my #1 concern. Most everything else comes second, even power, as it cannot be less than the Juicys I have, heh.

    Something I do like about the Elixir CR is the pad adjustment, which the RX (or R1 for that matter) don't have. Is that something you miss with these or do you really not care?

    Another question I have is this. How easy/hard is the pad replacement compared to Elixirs?

    Thanks.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by dr13zehn
    Yes,

    How is the modulation on those. I currently have the Juicy 5s and there is no real modulation to speak of. The blades are kind of sloppy as well. This would be my #1 concern. Most everything else comes second, even power, as it cannot be less than the Juicys I have, heh.

    Something I do like about the Elixir CR is the pad adjustment, which the RX (or R1 for that matter) don't have. Is that something you miss with these or do you really not care?

    Another question I have is this. How easy/hard is the pad replacement compared to Elixirs?

    Thanks.
    Modulation seems like it's going to be quite good. They have a stronger initial grab still than my Juicy 7's, but I think rotor size plays with that a bit. I haven't owned them long enough to get them broken in properly, so I can't comment authoritatively on modulation yet.

    I had pad contact adjustment on my 7's, and once it was set it was no big deal. I needed it on the Avid's to get the levers to be consistent to one another; with these they feel similar without it. If these brakes felt like they do currently, and had pad contact adjustment dials, I probably wouldn't touch them. OK, so I would, but I would probably put them back where they are now after I was done fondling.

    Pad replacement should be just about identical to the Elixirs, and much easier and faster than the Juicy's. Top-load with a retainer bolt.

  8. #8
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    Anymore new updates? I just pulled the trigger on a set, I'mm usually one to steer clear of first year products so hope I don't live to regret my decision!

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    Quote Originally Posted by banga
    Anymore new updates? I just pulled the trigger on a set, I'mm usually one to steer clear of first year products so hope I don't live to regret my decision!

    Not really. I pulled them back off the HiFi because it's going to its new home. I've had some hiccups with getting the build on the new bike finished, so I haven't really gotten any more time in on them. They're on the new bike, and here's a little tip: Don't go weight weenie and run three rotor bolts! I was going to have to pull the rotors back off the wheels soon anyway, so I just tacked the rotors on with three bolts instead of six. I was not going to be actually riding it anyway, so figured it would be fine. Buddy at the shop hops on, goes and does a nose wheelie, and the front rotor twists on those three bolts. The rotors are not incredibly cheap either. They are light, but there is no support for the center of the rotor other than the bolts (they come with the R1 rotors).

    I play with them on a pretty regular basis, but haven't really gotten a chance to ride them much.

  10. #10
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    I had my first ride on them this morning, only about an hour but quite impressed with them. Should probably bleed the rear after shortening the hose but still firm enough to ride with. Power is already impressive and I assume will continue to improve, good pad clesarence and no noise. Mine did come with the older style oro rotors but I'm not too bothered about that.

  11. #11
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    I ride street and park with only 3 rotor bolts. I regularly lock them up. I've never had an issue. I don't think I understand how it "twisted" because of running only three bolts. The bolts are holding it against a flat plane of the hub. It sounds more like the arms of the rotor failed.

    Aluminum rotor with the arms failed...


    Running only 3 rotor bolts should not result in that type of failure... More just bolt failure.

    Unless you ran all 3 rotor bolts on one side... rather than in a triangle. Or if your bolts were only finger tight...
    Last edited by XSL_WiLL; 11-25-2009 at 04:08 PM.

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  13. #13
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    I cant find these brakes stateside. Where did you guys get yours?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    I ride street and park with only 3 rotor bolts.
    don't mean to sound like a dick, but there's a reason most rotors use six bolts. yeah, you can run three like steve peat or world cup xc dudes and, most of the time you'll be good, but you also can't complain if / when the rotor fails.

    if you've got numbers from legitimate stress testing that show 3 bolts are as effective as 6, then i withdraw my comment.
    Support your local advocacy group: FVMBA!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by robot
    don't mean to sound like a dick, but there's a reason most rotors use six bolts. yeah, you can run three like steve peat or world cup xc dudes and, most of the time you'll be good, but you also can't complain if / when the rotor fails.

    if you've got numbers from legitimate stress testing that show 3 bolts are as effective as 6, then i withdraw my comment.
    I can think of at least two examples of a past disc brake that only had 3 rotor bolts. I can also think of models that only used 4 rotor bolts.

    I am far too lazy to do a drawing and perform FEA analysis.

    I do know that the sheer strength and tensile strength of steel bolts is plenty with just three.

    I suppose it's more plausible seeing as the mounting holes of the rotor are not connected and there's not a lot of contact between the rotor and the hub. Can you post a shot from the edge? The damage does not look extensive in the pictures you posted.
    Last edited by XSL_WiLL; 12-01-2009 at 01:51 AM.

  16. #16
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    I just put on a set or Oro K24's. Best brake I have ever ridden! Powerful stoppers, great modulation and excellent feeling levers using 160mm Alligator Windcutters. Did the warble thing the first ride after a stream crossing, rear brake only. Second ride both where completely quiet even after getting them wet.
    OB1 Kielbasa

    One is good!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    I suppose it's more plausible seeing as the mounting holes of the rotor are not connected and there's not a lot of contact between the rotor and the hub. Can you post a shot from the edge? The damage does not look extensive in the pictures you posted.
    Look at the design of the rotor. It needs all 6 bolts or you literally half the material handling the load, closest to the hub where the loads are highest.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChuckUni
    Look at the design of the rotor. It needs all 6 bolts or you literally half the material handling the load, closest to the hub where the loads are highest.
    Yes... that is what I was getting at...

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    I can think of at least two examples of a past disc brake that only had 3 rotor bolts. I can also think of models that only used 4 rotor bolts.

    I am far too lazy to do a drawing and perform FEA analysis.

    I do know that the sheer strength and tensile strength of steel bolts is plenty with just three.

    I suppose it's more plausible seeing as the mounting holes of the rotor are not connected and there's not a lot of contact between the rotor and the hub. Can you post a shot from the edge? The damage does not look extensive in the pictures you posted.
    I spent a good amount of time with a hammer, anvil, and vise. I've got it pounded back to flat (it was probably 1/2" out of true) and the arms went back partway to where they ought to be, but I don't think there's any way they're going to end up back where they belong.

    It was very wavy and the arms were much more offset than they are now when it happened.

    Eric

  20. #20
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    did you weight em?

  21. #21
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    about 250g for front brake w/o rotors and bolts. front 160m rotor is just 88g.

  22. #22
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    These are available at Pricepoint.com in the US now--sans rotors, but they also carry R1 88g rotors. Total with R1 160mm rotors should run under $200 per side.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaLove
    These are available at Pricepoint.com in the US now--sans rotors, but they also carry R1 88g rotors. Total with R1 160mm rotors should run under $200 per side.

    Your LBS can also order them... QBP has them in stock and they should be in the neighborhood of $180-200 per wheel.

  24. #24
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    Formula RX

    hi there, im from portugal and since im the only portuguese with this brakes i would like to ask you guys who can i get ride off the noise this brakes make? the guy that sold me this brakes said that they where less noisy then the shimano slx. Does someone have this problem??
    The brakes are very powerfull, but very noisy too...

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