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Thread: Fluid on pads?

  1. #1
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    Fluid on pads?

    If I got some dot4 on my pads are they done or can they be saved?

  2. #2
    MEGALOMANIAC
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    Sorry bud, they are 100% done. Be careful not to contaminate any other surfaces of the brakes with fluid.

    Time for a new set of pads....
    life is... "All About Bikes"...

  3. #3
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    Clean with brake cleaner or
    I would wash the pads with detergent. Then wash with Denatured alcohol (or methylated spirits). Let dry and install on rear brake and see if they work (ride in a controlled environment ie carefully). If they don't work then throw throw them out. I have cleaned oil off pads before.
    YMMV

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  4. #4
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    You can burn out fluid - I did it with my pads -, but you will have less brakepower...

  5. #5
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    Smile

    +1 on KU's idea! I have older XTR calipers that leak fluid pass the pistons and get on the pads sometimes I have used a bunsen burner type of torch and a vice and heat them till they glow to burn off the fluid. I can't say if you get less braking power or not, but the pads are useable. Hope that helps.

  6. #6
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    The LBS got something on my pads while servicing my fork, and after cleaning them with rubbing alcohol had little effect, I burned the stuff off by repeatedly riding down the steepest hill I could find, holding the brake and pedaling as hard as I could. (the back brake was still good, so I would have been safe if the front brake stared to fade). The rotor turned blue, but after that braking power was restored. The blue color of the rotor wore off a bit, but I haven't checked to see if it's completely gone after about a month of riding.
    Matt

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by m85476585
    The LBS got something on my pads while servicing my fork, and after cleaning them with rubbing alcohol had little effect, I burned the stuff off by repeatedly riding down the steepest hill I could find, holding the brake and pedaling as hard as I could. (the back brake was still good, so I would have been safe if the front brake stared to fade). The rotor turned blue, but after that braking power was restored. The blue color of the rotor wore off a bit, but I haven't checked to see if it's completely gone after about a month of riding.

    Take the pads out of the caliper...

    Get an old fry pan put the pads in it then set it on the stove at medium heat.

    Watch the smoke burn off the pad.

    When done reinstall pads.

    Takes about 15 mins

  8. #8
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    The easiest method of burning off whatever you got on pads - put them in the oven (or even just a toaster-oven) for a few minutes, use your discretion as to time/temperature.

  9. #9
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    The surest fire way to fix this is to get new ones.

  10. #10
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    I'm sorry, but they are done. No matter what you do to them they will never work as good as uncontaminated pads. After all they are your brakes. Heating them to burn off fluid can also mess up the bond that the brake pad material has with the backing plate. Just go get new ones and be more careful next time you work on your brakes.

  11. #11
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    What I have tried with mineral oil contamination is the following:
    1. Sanding
    2.Simple Green
    3.Rinse
    4. Apply heat to dry

    Unfortunately it did not do the trick but this process has worked for others.

  12. #12
    sm4
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    Pad contaminate with brake oil way to remove apply 180"c it will vaporising.
    the process doing this.
    Flush the caliper with water to clear the brake oil.looking for low hill, Ride down slowly
    apply brake temp will easily over 200"c after few minutes the oil will disappear.
    Never fry in pan, burn overheating will distroyed the compound.

  13. #13
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    Ideally I would replace the pads.

    But, as others suggested, I would still bake the pads to decontaminate, and then throw em into my pack as a spare set to use in case of emergency / loan to someone else on the trail that has dead pads (and same brakes obviously). I have earned several cases of beer simply by providing a used set of brake pads.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by fixgeardan
    If I got some dot4 on my pads are they done or can they be saved?
    Bake in toaster oven.

    Get mechanicals
    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak
    And I thought I had a bike obsession. You are at once tragic and awesome.

  15. #15
    EDR
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    I've had success with a toaster oven. I baked them at 500 degrees for 20 minutes or so. Dab the pad side with a cloth when hot. I've also used a blow torch to burn the oil out. That was fun but can't remember the outcome

  16. #16
    sm4
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    brake pad under heat threatment "pad surface" must have grip force on it, if not
    after bake, pad will swollen or come out an uneven surface.

  17. #17
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    brake fluid is water soluble,wash them and bake them

  18. #18
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    What about contamination by mineral oil - as used by Magura (Royal Blood) and Shimano? If I replace the pads, what the best way to clean the rotor?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by StumpjumperUK
    What about contamination by mineral oil - as used by Magura (Royal Blood) and Shimano? If I replace the pads, what the best way to clean the rotor?
    Simple Green (a multi purpose spray cleaner I would call it Spray and Wipe I think it is called Simple Green in the US) then a de natured alcohol wipe (again Metho in Aust)
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by StumpjumperUK
    What about contamination by mineral oil - as used by Magura (Royal Blood) and Shimano? If I replace the pads, what the best way to clean the rotor?

    Frying pan for the pads....

    Soap and water for the rotor

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