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  1. #1
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    Disc caliper alignment after refitting quick release wheel.

    I'm frustrated every time I remove my front quick release wheel, refit it and find that disc rotor and caliper are no longer aligned.

    My equipment is a Niner steel fork and XTR front hub and skewer with Shimano XT disk brakes and centre lock rotors. All parts are clean and in perfect working order, free from any damage. After slotting the wheel back into the fork I hold the bike by the stem and press the fork firmly down onto the wheel with the Quick release wide open. With my free hand I then do up the quick release (start to feel pressure at the halfway point of lever movement).

    I inevitably find that my nicely centered and rub free rotor now is sitting flush against one pad.

    Am I doing something wrong? Is this a problem for anyone else?

  2. #2
    B A N N E D
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    Try marking the axle and placing it in the same position every time you put the wheel back on, some people have found this stops the rub.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/general-discu...ff-781795.html
    Last edited by cobba; 10-27-2017 at 08:45 PM.

  3. #3
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    I tighten the quick release a little bit, then press down on the handlebars to make sure that the axle sits properly in the dropouts and then I tighten the quick release. Works for me.

  4. #4
    nvphatty
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    I'm curious about QR tension or the clamping force applied when closed as it must always differ to some degree. Other than by hand / feel any way to quantify this?? Is snug enough? or should it be tight? I realize on some bikes with horizontal sliders / drops that tight may be preferred or the norm.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by nvphatty View Post
    I'm curious about QR tension or the clamping force applied when closed as it must always differ to some degree. Other than by hand / feel any way to quantify this?? Is snug enough? or should it be tight? I realize on some bikes with horizontal sliders / drops that tight may be preferred or the norm.
    I think it should be tight, but not crazy tight. When I was a kid I used a hammer to close the QR. It worked fine, but it doesn't need to be that tight. Now I just tighten it with my hands.

  6. #6
    nvphatty
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fatsinglespeeder View Post
    I think it should be tight, but not crazy tight. When I was a kid I used a hammer to close the QR. It worked fine, but it doesn't need to be that tight. Now I just tighten it with my hands.
    me thinks the assistance of Mr hammer is a bit much..lol

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by nvphatty View Post
    me thinks the assistance of Mr hammer is a bit much..lol
    Yeah, I know. I didn't have any idea how tight it should be and thus I made it really tight. I did a lot of jumping then and I didn't want to lose my wheels

  8. #8
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    Thanks a lot for that cobba. I'll give that a shot.

  9. #9
    El CicloPath!!!!!!!
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    What you have to do is mark the axel and instucted above. Then, once the wheel is on, tighten and retighten the QR while looking at the disc and pad spacing thru the caliper. Its pretty easy to sight, especially when there is sunlight. When caming the qr closed and tightening, it will bring the pads close to the disc. A misaligned axel in the dropouts will usually cause one side to rub, so its important to get the axel in the same place, thus marking it with paint.

    This is how I did it, but I recently purchased the Yakima carrier that doesnt require removal of the front wheel.........................no more issues!

  10. #10
    Trail Tire TV on blogger
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fatsinglespeeder View Post
    I tighten the quick release a little bit, then press down on the handlebars to make sure that the axle sits properly in the dropouts and then I tighten the quick release. Works for me.


    this is the answer...

    many times when you clip the QR down you are actually twisting the axle/wheel inside the dropouts. It's very minor but when you move the distance out to the edge of the rotor it gets amplified and the tight tolerances between the rotor and the pads is small enough that it'll rub.

    if you snug every thing up, then just as you go to do the final clip add a good amount of weight on the handlebars the axles will stay seated.

    Obviously you need to make sure the caliper is set (many times the caliper is set to the wheel a tad out and people think the method isn't working)
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by thomllama View Post
    Obviously you need to make sure the caliper is set (many times the caliper is set to the wheel a tad out and people think the method isn't working)
    Yep, this is very important. The wheel needs to be aligned properly BEFORE the caliper is adjusted. If it isn't then you'll never find the position again when you remove the wheel and put it back in.

  12. #12
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    On QR tightness, I find many people over-tighten them, which if you've got cup & cone bearings can cause premature wear.

    Shimano guidelines say you should start to feel resistance in the lever at 90 degrees. I find this is an excellent rule of thumb, and results in a good clamping force, but not over-tightened.

  13. #13
    wyrd bi ful rd
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    Have you tried putting the wheel back on with the bike upside down?

    That way you are only concerned with tightening the quick release as the weight of the wheel will sit the skewers in the dropouts? And you can also see of the rotor has 'shifted' even so slightly against the pads as you press down on the lever.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by komekomegaijin View Post
    I'm frustrated every time I remove my front quick release wheel, refit it and find that disc rotor and caliper are no longer aligned.

    My equipment is a Niner steel fork and XTR front hub and skewer with Shimano XT disk brakes and centre lock rotors. All parts are clean and in perfect working order, free from any damage. After slotting the wheel back into the fork I hold the bike by the stem and press the fork firmly down onto the wheel with the Quick release wide open. With my free hand I then do up the quick release (start to feel pressure at the halfway point of lever movement).

    I inevitably find that my nicely centered and rub free rotor now is sitting flush against one pad.

    Am I doing something wrong? Is this a problem for anyone else?
    Yeah I get this problem....but now I always put the bike upside down and use my gut to push the wheels into the dropouts....works every time.

    Note your caliper mayhave been aligned with the wheel improperly set in the dropouts...so mount it and make sure that it is firmly in the dropouts then align the caliper....then it should work.

  15. #15
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    I believe it's now fixed. I think I had the quick release set a little to tight. I assume the tighter it is, the more the fork ends will bend, which I believe resulted in the brake rub.
    Loosened the other end of the quick release about a turn, still seemed tight, and the rub gone.

  16. #16
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    Hey. I was having a problem aligning the disc on my front wheel and found this thread. I took the wheel off, rotated it, put it back on, and voila, perfectly aligned. Thanks to the knowledgeable people. I had no idea QR hubs were so inconsistent that I'd have to rotate the axle until I found a fit.

  17. #17
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    I was so happy to switch to thru-axle setups - no more of those alignment issues!

    Glen
    2016 RMB Thunderbolt 750
    2016 RMB Blizzard 30

  18. #18
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    This is why I refuse to run a disc brake on any QR fork anymore. If you don't take off the front wheel very often then it's less painful. But if you, for example, ride to work everyday and take off the front wheel when you lock up your bike it's too much trouble to have to realign the brake when you put the wheel back on again.

    This is also the reason why I put a thru-axle fork on my hardtail that I use for work everyday. The wheel is not only aligned perfectly with the brake everytime but there is no drop-out to wear out. QR drop-outs do wear out and when they do they cause even more wheel/brake alignment issues.

    IMO QR should die and everything should be thru-axle.

  19. #19
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    That's what this thread has me thinking, that when I replace my front fork I'm also going to have to upgrade the front hub and rim to a thru-axle. Thanks for confirming that it's the solution.

  20. #20
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    As someone said it is alot easier if you flip the bike upside down

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by dundundata View Post
    As someone said it is alot easier if you flip the bike upside down
    I find this not perfect but more likely to get the wheel back on aligned as it was before. Even so it is still a bit of a crap-shoot especially with the front wheel.

  22. #22
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    I used to have this issue with bb7's because I kept the pads very close to the rotors. I haven't had this issue since switching to zeeeeeeeee

  23. #23
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    I had the same issue with BB7 brakes. It was a never ending brake rub frustration and the type you can hear while riding. Mind you sintered pads could of had something to do with that. I used to run a 185mm front rotor and I battled the BB7 for like a year. At the end of it I finally figured out how to adjust them but by then I was so exhausted from fighting with the brakes I decided no more BB7 for me.

    Once in a while I still see other riders with BB7's and I have actually heard their brakes rubbing while I'm riding next to them or they have crossed by path. With the BB7 you absolutely have to have the piston that doesn't move not more than the width of a hair away from the rotor.

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