Disc Brake Problems on Rear Brake - Advice? Opinions?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1

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    Disc Brake Problems on Rear Brake - Advice? Opinions?

    I visited my LBS and they said they haven't seen this one before.

    I'll try to make a short story and get the point across...

    I used a hex wrenches to set the distance on the rear (Coda) Disc Brakes. With the distance set I had about an inch play on my rear brake/handle. I started riding and noticed that they play was down to about 1/2 an inch (I thought this was good, because then I didn't have to squeeze it as far). Later I noticed the play was down to 0.

    As a result I was having to work extremely hard to pedal. Later I realized the brake on the inside in the rear was tightening itself creating friction disc and the brake (removing the play in the brake handle).

    I stopped... removed the rear wheel... loosed the inside brake... and was back to where I started... 1 inch play, etc, etc...

    Started riding again, problem reoccurred.

    My problem is, my rear brake tightens itself while I ride. The outside brake has a screw where you can set it where you want it. My inside brake... is as loose as a goose. There is no tension whatsoever... And there is not a screw to make it so (or set it).

    On this inside brake, I believe I used to have to give it a little effort to turn, but now it is sooo loose.

    Can I gunk this side up to keep it in place? (The LBS recommend that I use "blue something another" that can be purchased from a hardware store...)

    Please let me know, so I don't have to stop every 5 miles to loosen the disc brake.

    Thanks,
    S6
    Last edited by Shad6Bones; 07-14-2006 at 11:58 PM.

  2. #2
    Crashin' since the 60's
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    Your LBS was probably recommending a drop of blue Loctite on the screw threads that are moving under the vibration caused by riding. Any hardware store should have this stuff. Do not use red Loctite; this is more appropriate for bolts that are never to be turned.
    Flick Lives!

  3. #3

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    Shad, on the loctite look for the writing that says what color it is, not the tube color. Loctite threadlocker blue has a red bottle. Didn't want you to use the wrong stuff.

  4. #4
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    red locktite will melt. if the part that's being screwed to can stand the heat from a small propane torch, i'd vote red.

  5. #5

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    So Blue Locktite it is? Okay...

  6. #6
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    Loctite...

    Hey Shad,

    You're after thread-lock, an anaerobic adhesive for holding bolts in place when there is a risk of component movement or vibration working them loose. 'Loctite' is a brand name, a type of thread lock. Any half decent bike shop should stock appropriate thread lock adhesive for bike use, though it may not be by Loctite. As far as I know all thread lock from Loctite comes in a red bottle and so they use a numbering system to differentiate the different strengths.
    The particular Loctite that is good for use on bikes is 243, and it's colored blue. It's a mid-strength thread lock with many applications, not just bikes, so most big hardware or motorcycle stores should carry it. Don't use any Loctite other than 243 on bike bolts. Just make sure you tell the shop assistant what your intended purpose is, you shouldn't go wrong.
    Peace,
    Steve

    What use is a philosopher who doesn't hurt anybody's feelings? -
    Diogenes


  7. #7

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    Is Loctite a mixture that has to be mixed? How will it come from the store? Ready to use?

    Any application specific techniques to use?

    S6

  8. #8
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    Hey Shad,

    Check this out, this is the bottle size I use;

    http://www.difflock.com/buyersguide/...ctite243.shtml

    It should have instructions for use (clean surfaces, etc.) just make sure you shake the bottle very well first. You can either apply a run to the bolt thread or to the nut/component that the bolt is going into. It's very safe stuff to use, just use your common sense to keep it within the confines of the threads.
    Peace,
    Steve.

    What use is a philosopher who doesn't hurt anybody's feelings? -
    Diogenes


  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shad6Bones
    Is Loctite a mixture that has to be mixed? How will it come from the store? Ready to use?

    Any application specific techniques to use?
    No mixing required. (It's not an epoxy.)

    It'll come in a bottle that seems to be about half full. Why isn't it totally full? Because, if they filled the bottle all the way, it'd harden. (It hardens in the absence of air.)

    With regard to surface preparation, just make sure that the surface in question is reasonably clean. There's no need to remove all of the existing grease from the bolt to which you'll apply the loctite. Put a drop or two on the bolt and screw it in.

  10. #10

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    Will the new loctite seal break with considerable amount of force if I need to "repair" or maintenance something later?

    If so, is the "old" loctite easy to clean off if I need to reapply?

    S6

  11. #11
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    Hey S6,

    Loctite 243, the blue, medium strength thread-lock is kind of paste-like. It's not like the normal glue you'd use to stick stuff together. It's a very mild adhesive that sets up when it is deprived of air, like when you tighten a bolt up inside a thread. Any 243 that is still exposed to air will remain wet, and you can still wipe it away several days later. The stuff that sets up will stop your bolts rattling loose. Thread-locked bolts will take a small increase in torque to remove, but the increase is only just noticable.
    As a rough guide, apply 243 it to the middle third of the bolt you're fitting and you won't go wrong.
    In some ways it doesn't matter about removing old 243 from threads as it'll just keep acting as a lock. Just remove as much of the loose stuff as possible and follow your usual method for cleaning threads. I disagree with KevinB about not needing to remove grease from threads. In my experience, 243 has trouble setting up if there is grease present on the threads. Once a bolt is in place, you can put a thin run of grease around the top of the bolt, to keep water out, and wipe away the excess.
    Thread-lock in general is useful only in certain places. Keep threadlock away from suspension pivots, bushes and bearings, including hubs and headsets. Don't use it on caliper half bolts. If I can use a Nylock nut, I will. Although I do use 243 on my rotor bolts (better safe than sorry), I figure that a bolt fitted to the correct torque is going to stay in place anyway. It can, however, be useful for brake lever and shifter bolts. I always keep these bolts 'just tight' so that if I come off, or clip a tree, the component will move on the bars rather than bend or snap. 243 means the bolt threads tight enough to do this.
    Like I said, just use your common sense and you'll be fine.
    Peace,
    Steve.

    What use is a philosopher who doesn't hurt anybody's feelings? -
    Diogenes


  12. #12
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  13. #13

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    Would Teflon Plumbers Tape also do the trick? (If I put enough on to fill the gap that is letting the vibrations unscrew the screw)

    S6
    Last edited by Shad6Bones; 07-22-2006 at 09:30 PM.

  14. #14
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    Why use plumbers tape?

    Loctite is designed to solve exactly the problem that you have. You could also try duct tape, chewing gum, 2 part epoxy or even weld the screw in place; they all may work but none are the optimum solution.
    Flick Lives!

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