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  1. #1
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    constant squelling / dragging

    I have Hayes HFX-9 HD with 203mm rotors f/r

    Seems that when I pedal hard, my brakes will drag a little in the rear. I think its from the frame flexing, but my rear lever and caliper seem much MUCH tighter than my front lever/caliper.

    Also, it seems that at the beginning of a ride my brakes drag a little front and rear, but as I het them up, things stop dragging. Problem is, when its below 30 degrees outside, it doesnt seem like they ever warm up and stop dragging.

    Any reccomendations to remedy would be appreciated. I cant afford to buy new brakes just yet, so if I can fix these it would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Tool
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    You may need to bleed the brakes. It sounds like the rear may have more fluid than the front, and a proper bleed should eliminate that and result in a more even feel between the two.

    Regarding the dragging, you need to check and make sure you don't have any sticky pistons. Sticky pistons could match your symptoms since they may be more apt to stick in colder temps.

    Good luck,
    Pete
    I can barely get my mouth around it.

  3. #3
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    I will have to check that. Would I be able to check the piston without dissasembling the caliper completely?

    As far as the fluid, I did just recently bleed and flush all of the fluid on the front brake. I will have to go through the painful process of bleeding the rear now...

  4. #4
    Tool
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    Yes, you can check the pistons for stickiness without disassembling the caliper.

    First, simply observe how the pads move when you squeeze the lever. Both should be moving evenly. Next, remove the pads and verify that the pistons are extended equally. If they are not, at least one is sticking. You can go a step further by gently pushing the pistons back into their bores, and then giving the lever a squeeze or two to obseve the piston movement. It should be even. If not, at least one is sticking.

    If you observe any signs of sticking, you need to extend the pistons (careful not to go too far or you'll need to bleed), and cleaning the sides with alcohol. Push the pistons back in and repeat until they no longer stick. Sometimes it takes several iterations of this before they move freely.
    I can barely get my mouth around it.

  5. #5
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    from my experience with disk brakes if they squeak or drag it is not fluid related
    1) automotive brake cleaner spray that on them to clean them off if no fix on to 2 ect.
    2) loosen the 2 bolts that center the caliper to the roter and apply the brake don't let go and tighten them up with brakes still applied.
    3) if they still drag disassemble the pads and inspect to see if the brake pad is still glued to the metal they sometimes un glue themselves after a few years.

  6. #6
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    I have tried everything. Think I am going to try different discs next weekend. The pads are relatively new, as are the rotors.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalphile View Post
    Yes, you can check the pistons for stickiness without disassembling the caliper.

    First, simply observe how the pads move when you squeeze the lever. Both should be moving evenly. Next, remove the pads and verify that the pistons are extended equally. If they are not, at least one is sticking. You can go a step further by gently pushing the pistons back into their bores, and then giving the lever a squeeze or two to obseve the piston movement. It should be even. If not, at least one is sticking.

    If you observe any signs of sticking, you need to extend the pistons (careful not to go too far or you'll need to bleed), and cleaning the sides with alcohol. Push the pistons back in and repeat until they no longer stick. Sometimes it takes several iterations of this before they move freely.
    This is the solution, IMO. I have these brakes on my dirt jumper and they seem to be extremely sensitive to even a small amount of crud on the pistons. After I fully extend the pistons, I clean them with alcohol as pedalphile said, but I use another q tip to apply a small amount of brake fluid to the exposed part of the pistons. I then work the pistons gently in and out fully a few times. Be careful and patient when working the pistons back into the caliper, I think I used a 10mm open end wrench so not to damage the fragile little pad retention piece on the piston. (Looks like a little nail head)
    I have found the best way to adjust these brakes is to leave the bolts slightly snug and then I use a wooden dowel about 1" diameter by 6" long and gently tap it with a small hammer until the pad alignment equal on both sides of the rotor. In my experience if you leave the caliper bolts too loose when adjusting, ever time you torque them down the caliper moves.
    2008 GT Force
    Go Veg

  8. #8
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    I will try again. I noticed when clamping the brake then tightening I did get caliper movement.

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