Can I put a rear disc brake on this?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Can I put a rear disc brake on this?

    OK, don't laugh. I have a folding frame that I really want to keep, but I would like to upgrade the wheels and brakes.

    I can put a disc on the front shock easy enough, but the rear is a challenge.

    It looks like this:


    The distance of the two screw holes from center to center is 23 MM.

    Does anyone know of an adapter that would work? I would prefer not to go the BreakTherapy route if possible.

    I really don't care about caliper rotor size. If I can get an adapter that will work, I'll get the appropriate caliper/rotor to make it all work.

    Any help is appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Reputation: SteveUK's Avatar
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    You're probably best off going with an A2Z adaptor. Here's a link. Out of curiosity, what is the distance between the dropouts?

    What use is a philosopher who doesn't hurt anybody's feelings? -
    Diogenes


  3. #3
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    Steve,

    Thanks for your reply. That thing might work. I am going to look into it.

    I just measured the dropouts and the distance between the 2 is 138mm. Do you know if that is going to pose another problem? I hope not...

    Thanks!

  4. #4
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    I just wondered whether or or not your fold-away bike might use a narrower hub/axle, which may have presented you with some problems finding a disc hub. If you take a look at this page from Sheldon Brown's site, you'll perhaps see why I was curious.
    As it stands, as long as your 138mm measurement is internally between the dropouts, you won't have any problem finding a disc hub (135mm is pretty much standard for rear disc hubs). Excuse me if you already knew this, it was just something that came to mind.

  5. #5
    lurkio
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    Just bear in mind that the seatstay was never designed for the stress a disc will put through it, possible catastrophic failure may result
    We went, earth, sky, earth sky, earth skyambulance

  6. #6
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    Thanks for your replies. No, at this point in my research, I did not know that 135 mm was standard. That is good news.

    Is the stress induced by a disc break really that severe? I would understand if I was doing serious downhill competition or something but for basically tooling around town and mild trail riding would it really be a problem?

    Thanks

  7. #7
    lurkio
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bazooka
    Thanks for your replies. No, at this point in my research, I did not know that 135 mm was standard. That is good news.

    Is the stress induced by a disc break really that severe? I would understand if I was doing serious downhill competition or something but for basically tooling around town and mild trail riding would it really be a problem?

    Thanks
    It's not massive stress as in whacking it with a hammer, just not designed for that application. I suppose riding as you intend then a weak mechanical brake would be ok. The initial force on applying the brake would be less and the brake still enough for to stop you. Just be aware and check after every ride
    We went, earth, sky, earth sky, earth skyambulance

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