Can Avid SD7 levers be used with cantilevers?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Can Avid SD7 levers be used with cantilevers?

    I am working on a project with cantilever brakes. Can Avid SD7 levers be used with cantilevers. I know they are designed for v brakes, but I thought I heard someone tell me they can be used with cantilevers if you adjust the speed dial to max leverage instead of max pull.
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  2. #2
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    Sure they can. Levers for V brakes tend to pull more cable than a canti lever. If you didn't have speed dial, that would mean you might feel the brakes are harder to modulate, or go too quickly from off to on. Even then it might not be a big deal and you could adapt to it.
    With speed dial, moving the dial "in" so that the cable end is closer to the lever pivot, would give you more modulation and less pull, which would be closer to the lever that was designed for the cantis.
    I used SD levers with Onza canti's for years.

  3. #3
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    Umm.... your physics is a bit off. Closer to pivot gives your higher leverage which results in greater force (braking power) and less modulation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by vk45de
    Umm.... your physics is a bit off. Closer to pivot gives your higher leverage which results in greater force (braking power) and less modulation.

    This it the internet , the laws of physics do not apply here . Or gravity .

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by vk45de
    Umm.... your physics is a bit off. Closer to pivot gives your higher leverage which results in greater force (braking power) and less modulation.
    I don't think so. With the cable closer to the pivot, you pull less cable for each millimeter of lever movement. that gives you more modulation, since a mm of lever movement has less effect on pad movement, compared to if the cable was farther from the pivot.
    I think the Avid literature agrees with me. Take a look:
    http://www.sram.com/_media/techdocs/...-7-install.pdf

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve
    I don't think so. With the cable closer to the pivot, you pull less cable for each millimeter of lever movement. that gives you more modulation, since a mm of lever movement has less effect on pad movement, compared to if the cable was farther from the pivot.
    I think the Avid literature agrees with me. Take a look:
    http://www.sram.com/_media/techdocs/...-7-install.pdf
    I agree with this.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by rkj__
    I agree with this.
    I agree with that as well.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve
    I think the Avid literature agrees with me. Take a look:
    http://www.sram.com/_media/techdocs/...-7-install.pdf
    It would appear they do. I stand corrected.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by vk45de
    Umm.... your physics is a bit off. Closer to pivot gives your higher leverage which results in greater force (braking power) and less modulation.
    I have been thinking about this a lot, trying picture the forces and remember my old physics lessons, and you were somewhat right.
    My conclusion is that when the cable end is closer to the pivot, this increases force and modulation. Picture a see-saw with the fulcum (pivot) off center. A force on the long side can lift a heavier weight on the short side, although the weight moves less distance.
    This is what happens with the brake lever: your finger is on the long side, and moving the cable end closer to the pivot allows more force, but less distance, by the brake pads.
    Modulation is a little trickier than force. With cable close to pivot, small movements of the lever result in even smaller movement of the pads, so this can be pictured as more modulation - the ability to better control small pad movements.
    On the other hand, when the cable end is far from the pivot, the result is less leverage, or less force on the brake pads. This could also affect the modulation, as squeezing harder on the lever would result in less slowing down of the rim due to less power.
    In conclusion, with the cable far from the pivot, cable pull is greater, and a small lever movement could result in a "full off" to "full on" pad movement which is why Avid would call this the low modulation position, but there is a mitigating factor of the lower power, which may make this position feel better in terms of modulation to some people.
    I would say the outer position just offers a different feel, more firm, allows brake pads to be set farther from the rim, and requires more force by your fingers to stop the bike.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljsmith
    I am working on a project with cantilever brakes. Can Avid SD7 levers be used with cantilevers. I know they are designed for v brakes, but I thought I heard someone tell me they can be used with cantilevers if you adjust the speed dial to max leverage instead of max pull.
    You guys are funny!

    Basically, you all agree and are correct. Cantilever brakes need a lever with a higher mechanical advantage and less cable pull than a V-brake. The Speed Dial lever should work OK with the cable anchor moved as close to the bar as possible.

    This provides the most power to the brake and allows it to be effective with the least amount of hand effort.

    Modulation and what that means is a long debated subject and can mean different things to different riders.
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