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Thread: Bleed Cost?

  1. #1
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    New question here. Bleed Cost?

    I have a Formula K24 rear brake that needs to be bled. I am curious as to how much an LBS might charge? I found a 2 year old thread and the prices ranged from $10 per wheel to $60 for both. Is that a current fair price?

    I know I can by the bleed kit and do it myself many more times a lot cheaper, but time is tight, so hopefully someone can provide insight into current costs.
    You cannot go against nature, because when you do, its part of nature too.

  2. #2
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    Take the time out to do it yourself.It takes 10/15 mins.Don't part with your hard earned cash $60 is like 40 for 30mins max.Wish i was on 80/$100 an hour

  3. #3
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    The problem I'm seeing with paying people to bleed your brakes is that they can skimp on the important stuff, the brake fluid. My LBS uses Goldren Spectro Dot 4, which is good, but they could potentially use cheapo fluid with lower wet/dry boiling points, which can decrease your braking performance considerably.

    You can use an Avid bleed kit on Formula brakes, which are about $25. A bleed at my local shop costs $25. hmmmm

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ottoreni
    I have a Formula K24 rear brake that needs to be bled. I am curious as to how much an LBS might charge? I found a 2 year old thread and the prices ranged from $10 per wheel to $60 for both. Is that a current fair price?

    I know I can by the bleed kit and do it myself many more times a lot cheaper, but time is tight, so hopefully someone can provide insight into current costs.
    It's well worth learning how to do it yourself. Chances are you'll get a feel for when to make that last squeeze and tighten, and you'll do a better job that the bike shop. The first and last time I bled at a bike shop they (DNA, Maidenhead) did an appalling job and my bike was covered in dot4 and only the rear brake worked, but both sets of Hayes original sintered pads were contaminated.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Renovatio
    The problem I'm seeing with paying people to bleed your brakes is that they can skimp on the important stuff, the brake fluid. My LBS uses Goldren Spectro Dot 4, which is good, but they could potentially use cheapo fluid with lower wet/dry boiling points, which can decrease your braking performance considerably.

    You can use an Avid bleed kit on Formula brakes, which are about $25. A bleed at my local shop costs $25. hmmmm

    How cheap can it get? Where do you get boiling point info? Would it really matter on a bike?

    I use Comma DOT4.

  6. #6
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    It can matter.
    Using DOT4 on Hayes Stroker brakes with 6" rotors the factory info tells you that you can boil the fluid on 'downhill' runs and they reccomend 8" rotors to lower the heat buildup for that application.

    If you use DOT3 instead it is still compatible with the brakes but has a lower boiling point.
    DOT5.1 is still compatible but has a higher boiling point and costs more.

    My mech uses DOT5.1 for his own bikes but uses whatever the manufacturer reccomends for customers. The Hayes literature/website says DOT 3 or DOT 4 only even though the DOT 5.1 has a higher boiling point and is compatible.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by 9speed
    How cheap can it get? Where do you get boiling point info? Would it really matter on a bike?

    I use Comma DOT4.
    It does make a difference. Say a pair of Hayes brakes required DOT3/4 fluid. You can skimp and get cheap house brand DOT3 fluid with a wet boiling point of 284F, or you can use a proper DOT 4 fluid with a wet boiling point of 366F. Meaning once your brake fluid as absorbed some water, which it will inevitably do, the performance difference will be huge when the brakes heat up, like on long downhills.

  8. #8
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    I have k18s and they are easy to bleed. You do have to take them off the bike to get the right angles for the bleed ports. Follow ALL the steps in the formula bleed instructions. That lever pull as you have vacuum on the lever bleed port is real important.

    The avid brake bleed kit works fine and has some fluid in it.
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

  9. #9
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    Last time I had a LBS do the work it cost 25 dollars plus parts.
    My Bike: '18 Giant Talon 3 29er
    My Blog: http://http://kona0197.wordpress.com/

  10. #10
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    at 200lbs plus gear, i just did 15 steep downhill miles on whatever random dot4 i could find. no boil over.

    cheap fluid will NOT decrease braking performance what so ever. when talking about non compressable fluids, they will all act and feel the same until boil over.

    what really gets you is the water.. water has a really low boiling point, and brake fluid sucks it up like mad. an opened bottle with a cap can suck moisture out of the air and go bad over time. keep clean fluid in there and you're good. valvoline syn dot 4 is great because everyone sells it everywhere, its cheap, it lasts long enough. never order fancy goofy fluids, just get what works locally.

  11. #11
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    Ordered Kit

    Okay, bought the kit for just over $20. Will find sometime during T-giving.

    Now for the fluid, I take it I can just by a quality dot 4 fluid at my local auto parts store?

    Thanks for all the input!
    You cannot go against nature, because when you do, its part of nature too.

  12. #12
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    valvoline is typically the highest quality available-everywhere fluid. theres better fluids, but not by much and they pale in comparison in terms of easy to find.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ottoreni
    Okay, bought the kit for just over $20. Will find sometime during T-giving.

    Now for the fluid, I take it I can just by a quality dot 4 fluid at my local auto parts store?

    Thanks for all the input!
    The power and influence of MTBR continues!

    I say go to 2 or so auto parts stores and buy the one with the highest boiling point. Most likely its going to be a name brand. Should run $5 or so. Better fluid can be found on-line or perhaps a motorcycle shop.

  14. #14
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    Any DOT4 should meet the minimum specs for DOT4.
    Substituting DOT3 which is compatible and authorized by the manufacturer (at least in the case of Hayes) will decrease your boiling point.

    Older fluid will probably have absorbed more water than sealed fluid and as has been mentioned the water will lower the boiling point of the system.

  15. #15
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    I 2nd the motorcycle shop. You will find more dot 5 there.


    Quote Originally Posted by Ottoreni
    Okay, bought the kit for just over $20. Will find sometime during T-giving.

    Now for the fluid, I take it I can just by a quality dot 4 fluid at my local auto parts store?

    Thanks for all the input!
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by ziscwg
    I 2nd the motorcycle shop. You will find more dot 5 there.
    I'm not sure if DOT 5 is a good idea.
    It is silicon based and isn't compatible with DOT 3 or DOT 4.

    DOT 5.1 on the other hand is compatible, just has a higher boiling point.

  17. #17
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    +1 on doing it yourself.

    I can bleed my brakes better than my LBS. I am not that good, it is just I know my brakes better than them, cos they are mine =-)

    Sure if it is a common brake like an Shimano XT, but formula the one, even the specialist in the country can't do a good job.

    I mailed them to Scotland 3 times and they couldn't do it right.
    It is a simple simple procedure.

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