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Thread: bb7 to Hydro's

  1. #1
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    bb7 to Hydro's

    How much of an improvement would one see moving from bb7's to a decent Hydro(set under $200).

    What set would you recommend for around $200. Id like them to be reliable and have amazing stopping power with good modulation.

    How often do you really need to bleed the system? I've read some people here say 10 years and others say 3 months.

  2. #2
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    save your money and stick to bb7

  3. #3
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    Here we go agian!!!!!

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    Well I have had the bb7's for about a year, had them installed by the lbs and have been back 5 times to have them looked at(tried new pads also). The brakes just simply don't bite. The lbs is in denial and all 3 of its mechanics says this is as good as it gets with these types of brakes. I really have no recourse, since the mechanics say they are operating properly.

    I could go to another shop but, it will be $50 for them just to look at them, more to reinstall them after that, and id rather just put that into brakes I know will work.

    Here we go agian!!!!!
    I did search but could not really find a good thread that answered my question properly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LlamaZorz



    I did search but could not really find a good thread that answered my question properly.
    Just punch in bb7 hydro in the search, I just did it there is more info then you will ever need. There are so many opinions out there and I am sure you will get anything from bb7's suck to you don't have them set up right to they the greatest thing ever invented. I had them I liked them a lot I bought hydro's just because they where cooler.

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    forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=571055
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  7. #7
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    would the avid elixir R's be good and easy to setup? Im a bit concerned with the idea that you must bleed them before you even install them the first time.

  8. #8
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    AFAIK they come pre-bled and ready to use.
    My Bike: '18 Giant Talon 3 29er
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kona0197
    AFAIK they come pre-bled and ready to use.
    well yes that's what is advertised, but many posts here claim they come with bubbles in the tubes? Im not really sure as this is new to me.

  10. #10
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    I used bb7's for at least a year, and although I think they are the best mech discs out there here's my synopsis.

    BB7's = ON/OFF. They bite hard.
    Good hydro's = modulation.

    I'd never go back, that's for sure. As far as how often to bleed the answers will run the gamut from never to monthly. I've had my XT's for 2 years now, never bled them since I cut the lines in month one.

  11. #11
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    I used BB7's for a year and half. Very good brake. I just went to Fomula Oro K24's. A much more powerful and better modulating brake. I don't even know why I changed but I did and am glad I did.
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    One is good!

  12. #12
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    I started out with bb7's, liked them a lot. Then went to hayes stroker carbons and never felt like the power was there, it could have been just my setup but I turn a decent wrench. Next I went to the xt 775 love them lots except in the real cold. As far as the elixir brakes, just going off of what other people say I would give them time to get the bugs worked out.

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    Are their any brakes that are actually care free. This whole brake thing seems like a big fiasco. This brake doesn't have good adjustability, this one makes noise that cant be fixed, that one's pads hit the rotor, we can fix it this way and that way, etc.

    Is there just a brake one can buy that just work the way it was designed to and the way it is expected to.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by LlamaZorz
    Are their any brakes that are actually care free. This whole brake thing seems like a big fiasco. This brake doesn't have good adjustability, this one makes noise that cant be fixed, that one's pads hit the rotor, we can fix it this way and that way, etc.

    Is there just a brake one can buy that just work the way it was designed to and the way it is expected to.
    My coaster brake was care free but then I never mountain biked with it nor did I have any idea whether it even needed servicing when I used one. Of the disc brakes I'd say the BB7 is as close as it gets, in terms of simple maintenance and performance, at least for me. I finally got a set of hydraulics this year (Elixir CRs), and while they're nice and all adjusting hoses/bleeding is much more a pain (and mess) than changing housing ever could be. Adjusting a pad dial once in a while was never an issue for me, self-adjusting for pad wear just doesn't tip the scales in favor of the hydraulic, nor does the little bit extra use of the hand.

    OTOH don't just absorb the complaints, most brake systems work quite well overall and many of the complainers just don't spend the time with setup they should. Just my .02
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    You have to admit bikinfoolferlife that those hydros are a bit more powerful than your BB7 are they not?

    I agree with your statement about most systems work quite well.

    well yes that's what is advertised, but many posts here claim they come with bubbles in the tubes? Im not really sure as this is new to me.
    No they don't come with air bubbles in the tubes.
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    I understand your guys points that only a select few people have problems, but with my luck I will be one of those people. I just have very bad luck when it comes to buying things.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by LlamaZorz
    Are their any brakes that are actually care free. This whole brake thing seems like a big fiasco. This brake doesn't have good adjustability, this one makes noise that cant be fixed, that one's pads hit the rotor, we can fix it this way and that way, etc.

    Is there just a brake one can buy that just work the way it was designed to and the way it is expected to.
    Before you give up on your BB7s, here's something to think about.

    My first bike came with Juicy 5s. They howled. Trying to get the brakes to "feel" the same was a fiasco - one lever was inevitably mushier, or traveled further, than the other. The gap between the rotors and pads was tiny and caused constant rubbing. This only worsened anytime a wheel was taken off and on, and necessitated constant realignment of the caliper. Headaches, headaches...

    So the LBS swapped them out for XT 775s, and it was a major improvement. I specifically had my sights set on this brake because it offered more clearance between the pads and rotors, and it made a difference. Rubbing problem solved. But, as others have mentioned, the pistons become sticky in cold weather, and that is a huge recipe for headaches.

    That bike was eventually sold and I built up a XC 29er on a very generous budget. I could have put any brake I wanted on it but chose BB7s, Speed Dial SL levers and full-length Jagwire Ripcord non-compression housing and cables. Unless you're a really heavy guy into big downhill runs, I don't see how you can't be satisfied with this set up.

    The brakes have plenty of power, and are quiet. Getting both levers to feel identical is child's play - they both feel very firm when the brakes begin to engage, and snap back. No mushiness or levers slow to retract here. And rubbing issues are non-issues because pad clearance is eliminated simply by turning a dial.

    You asked if there is a brake out there that is care free. I'd say that after your caliper alignment is set, which is easy, but critical, the BB7s come close. You do have to adjust for pad wear, which is so easy I don't understand why people complain about it. It takes far less time to adjust the pads than it does to put a few PSIs in your tires before a ride.

    I think for XC riding, nicehydros are nice, but overkill. I've heard Shimano may have fixed the cold weather problem with their XT brakes, but I'm not even tempted to replace my BB7s for them. One more thing - it's bliss working on my bike's brakes inside my heated home - BB7s are super adjustable and easy to work on, and no brake fluid to mess things up...

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by LlamaZorz
    I understand your guys points that only a select few people have problems, but with my luck I will be one of those people. I just have very bad luck when it comes to buying things.
    I am also one of those guys.

  19. #19
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    Sounds like it's time to start dealing with another LBS if they are giving you any runaround. I'd take it somewhere else and see if they can fix it. $50 is a cheap price to know if you can trust someone or not.

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    The thing is, if you want to upgrade to hydros then you should! I'm in the process of purchasing some elixir r's to replace my bb5's which should be a vast improvement (i'm not totally happy with them), but I honestly just wanted to upgrade. Its part of the fun of having a nice mountain bike. Sure the hydros won't be maintenance free and when you do have to do maintenance its a little more involved but I think if you want to there's no reason why you shouldn't. I know you've probably heard it a million times before just follow the instructions. sure any manufacturer is going to have duds, but thats what a warranty is for. The hydros look cool and save you some weight. I'll lose nearly half a pound switching my bb5s to elixir rs. I think its well worth the money and the effort!
    Good luck!

  21. #21
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    @CoastieTX
    While yes I could keep trying the BB7's, but the cost is closely reaching the price of a decent pair of hydros which will give me better braking performance no matter what I do to the BB7's. At least that is what I have gathered from posted personal opinion.

    @BDSmith
    While I could take it to another LBS, the price of doing so will negate the possibility for me to get new brakes. I have the money now to get new brakes and leave the BB7's behind. I can continue to try and play with the BB7's. but why when they never have worked as so many suggest here.

    @jem
    I know all products have duds, its just that to recourse such a situation I have to go through a LBS. Which is expensive and ridiculous, given that the LBS while decent will do anything I mean anything to not call and utilize warranty.

  22. #22
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    Llama,

    The biggest issue with any brake feeling like there is no bite, is the break in period.

    What brake levers and cables are you using?

    My setup is as follows

    BB7's with Alligator rotors 180mm
    Jagwire Ripcord full length brake cables/housing
    Avid Speed Dial 7 brake levers.

    When the BB7's are matched with a good brake lever and cable set (not the ones that come with the bike or the bulk style housings that most LBS use) these brakes are absolutely incredible.

    There are times when I almost pitch myself over the bars with just 1 finger on the front brake. I've been using the BB7's for 2 years now with absolutely zero problems.

    The best way to the break in procedure - brake pad bedding - is to find a small incline - a development street works great for this - is to go as fast as you can down the incline and apply the brakes - both front and rear - until right before wheel lock up. Do this 5-6 times and put the bike away overnight. You will find that your brakes will perform much better.

    One thing you might need to do is to remove the brake pads and clean up the brake surface with some sandpaper or even replace the pads before proceeding with the break in procedure.

  23. #23
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    You can get juicy sevens for less than $100 per wheel all over the internet now. Ive ridden both them, and the bb7s for extended periods of time. The bb7's have plenty of bite, and are mostly maintenance free as long as you run full length housing. I personally prefer the juicy 7 because they have more modulation and therefore give me more control over the bike. One of the trails I race on has a 10 minute downhill that is extremely fast, and when im on the bb7's I usually have to lock the wheel up and power slide around corners to maintain speed due to the lack of modulation. with the juicy 7's I can bring the wheel right to the edge of losing traction, without actually losing it. hope i helped

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kona0197
    You have to admit bikinfoolferlife that those hydros are a bit more powerful than your BB7 are they not?

    I agree with your statement about most systems work quite well.



    No they don't come with air bubbles in the tubes.
    We were just talking about this on the trail today and the consensus was the BB7s work every bit as well for most riding (and all the riding a few of us do). That term powerful means different things to different people; to me, while the Elixirs may have an edge on power and a bit easier in applying it, it isn't a factor for the most part in terms of what works for me. I think the BB7s have the edge in several categories and I'm in no hurry to try another hydraulic at this point, and will continue to use the BB7s on several of my bikes.

    Yes, my Elixirs indeed came with an air pocket, laying the bike down on it's side brought that to light soon after installation (with no shortening of hoses, stock out of the box) with the front brake. I've improved it via bleeding, but there is still something in there that changes my pad contact point adjustment sometimes during a ride and between rides, which is annoying as hell. Fortunatley there is that adjustment to even it out but that's a lot more work than adjusting for pad wear so far. The uneven properties of systems that don't have that pad contact point type adjustment aren't even a consideration for me.
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    I honestly think your problems are due to poor installation and your LBS. And if your LBS can't sort out your BB7s, I can guarantee you'll be even more frustrated when they try to sort out your hydros...

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoastieTX
    I honestly think your problems are due to poor installation and your LBS. And if your LBS can't sort out your BB7s, I can guarantee you'll be even more frustrated when they try to sort out your hydros...

    -thats a really good point. the bb7's definitley have bite. A ton of it actually. Maybe you didnt break them in properly when you got them?? If this is the case you may need new rotors.

    -They are really simple to set up. Even if you arent mechanically inclined you could probably do it with the help of this video:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x1kezXQVnLY

  27. #27
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    Ive been installing new BB7's(see other thread), followed the avid video and they really haven't been all to spectacular so far. I've tried high end hydros before and you give the front a slight tap and you are over the bars.

  28. #28
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    Tried Hayes Nines, went back to BB7s.
    Tried Hayes Strokers, went back to BB7s.
    Tried Avid Elixir CRs, went back to BB7s.
    Tried Shimano XTs (775), went back to BB7s.
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  29. #29
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    Wouldn't you BB7 guys rather use a caliper that has two pistons that move and automatically adjust to pad wear? Curious...
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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kona0197
    Wouldn't you BB7 guys rather use a caliper that has two pistons that move and automatically adjust to pad wear? Curious...
    i don't mind moving the pads in. it only takes a couple seconds to do. and i dont have to deal with bleeding and brake fluid

  31. #31
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    Honestly - bleeding is a once in a blue moon thing. That's why people say hydros have less maintenance overall. And if you know what you are doing it's done in 10 minutes and it's not a messy job.

    Oh well. Use what you like.
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    All ya need to do is read a thread like this http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=574795 to know bleeding is not really a once in a blue moon thing.

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    you beat me i was just going to post that

  34. #34
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    That's just one brand of hyrdos. There are many others that require less bleeding.
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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kona0197
    Wouldn't you BB7 guys rather use a caliper that has two pistons that move and automatically adjust to pad wear? Curious...
    The two piston thing doesn't make a great deal of difference, but does have it's own built in problems with uneven piston action over time (or in adverse weather/conditions), which means more caliper maintenance right there than you need for a BB7 IME. Automatic pad adjustment would be fine, but I'd rather have a pad adjustment to begin with (i.e. where you want the pads to sit from the get-go, but that's not an option with any hydraulics I can think of). The very little time it takes to move a dial is nothing, like someone says, putting air in your tires takes more effort. BB7 just gives you more options with your pads for positioning and tuning. Heck, you don't even need to worry about your brake lever getting squeezed with your wheel out...
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by LlamaZorz
    All ya need to do is read a thread like this http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=574795 to know bleeding is not really a once in a blue moon thing.
    I have mulitple sets of Elixr brakes and have only bled 1 time each, been riding them now for 3 years.

    Just sayin, this guy is doing it wrong.
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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kona0197
    Wouldn't you BB7 guys rather use a caliper that has two pistons that move and automatically adjust to pad wear? Curious...
    As I've said on another thread, the autoadjusment for pad wear is one of the downfalls of the Hayes Stroker's IMO compared to the ease of dialing in the BB7s.

    Checking every ride or two and rotating a dial a couple notches back and forth is SIMPLE compared to adjusting hydro pistons that have decided to rub all the time. Even if you only have to screw with the hydros every 3-6 months the BB7s are much easier in the long run and less time consuming when you add up the fiddle factor time.

    Why is two moving pistons supposed to be superior?

    Even if you are going to have a weekend of epic rides you probably won't have to touch the dials except between rides and there is usually plenty of time for that.

  38. #38
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    If you guys complain about bleeding the brakes on your bikes and routine maintenance on them, I really have a hard time believing you can take care of anything. Do any of you own a car or truck, because the maintenance on them is 10 times harder/ more expensive. How about a house, or do you all live in barns or caves. Yall sound like a bunch of cry babies to me.

    On my thoughts towards the OP, if you got the cash, get you some hydros. I just bought a pair of Avid Juicy Carbons. I have yet to get them in the mail but they are replacing some cheapo disk brakes that came with my bike. The crappy brakes on there cost 12 dollars a pair and I could go over the bars with one finger when the pads were new. The reason I bought some new brakes is because it was hard to find the pads for those brakes, OTOH avid juicy brakes are dime-a-dozen. I also thought about getting BB7 but I had the cash and decided I would like the hydros better. Im not knocking the BB7's at all, some people on this site swear by them. I believe that 90% of the problems with people and their brakes on this site is proper setup. And I always laugh when people say that their brakes dont have enough power. Do they weigh 550 pounds? I have a hard time believing that ANY disk brake does not have enough power granted it is in decent working condition.

    It really depends on if you want to spend the cash, bleed the brake or have pay someone else to do it, and a number of other factors.

  39. #39
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    It really depends on if you want to spend the cash, bleed the brake or have pay someone else to do it, and a number of other factors.
    Also take into consideration that hydraulic brakes rarely need to be bleed.
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  40. #40
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    I ran BB7's for about 5 years on a 4 in. XC bike. They worked great, everyonce in a while if I rode a very long steep descending trail longer than 2 miles, my hands did get tired where the point I had to stop to shake them out. I used the stock 160 mm roundagon rotors.

    When I switched to a more aggresive AM rig (5 1/2 in travel) the BB7's that I loved were no longer adequate. The increased travel allowed me to bomb down trails faster but the BB7s were not slowing me down to where I felt safe and in control at the increased speed.

    So someone suggested a bigger rotor up front, so I installed a 185 mm. rotor and there was improvement, but the front brake now felt really grabby and it was hard to not lock them up. So I finally gave up and went with the Juicy 7's with a 160 mm cleansweep rotor in the back and 185mm cleansweep in the front.

    The stopping power was way better, and they brakes were not grabby, but now I had another problem, they were noisy as hell with the stock Avid metallic pads. And I kept glazing them and it was a dissapointment....but then I switched to organic pads and finally I'm happy with the brakes.....like anything trying to bleed them properly and without making a mess took a few tries but now I feel confident I can do it properly...

  41. #41
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    if you rely on the lbs to install & fiddle with BB7 brakes, you might want to think twice about hydros. BB7 are about as easy to install and maintain as it gets. also, I will add that my BB7, on 2 different bikes, will stop a train.

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    Just thought Id let you all know that me and my brother(beaver) were able to get the brakes working great, after XSL_Will suggested we sand down the pads and re-bed them as well as re-align the calliper as also suggested my many of you. Now we have no problem locking out the wheels even with the 160mm rotors. So I am happy I dont need to go to Hydros as of yet.

    Thanks all, especially Bikinfoolferlife for all the help.

  43. #43
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    Good to hear that you got your BB7's sorted out.

    I'm getting ready to pick up another set for my 29r. So that will be 2 bikes with the 7's.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by LlamaZorz
    Just thought Id let you all know that me and my brother(beaver) were able to get the brakes working great, after XSL_Will suggested we sand down the pads and re-bed them as well as re-align the calliper as also suggested my many of you. Now we have no problem locking out the wheels even with the 160mm rotors. So I am happy I dont need to go to Hydros as of yet.

    Thanks all, especially Bikinfoolferlife for all the help.
    That is great you got them working and plus now we can put an end to another BB7 or Hydro Epic Thread.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoastieTX
    Before you give up on your BB7s, here's something to think about.

    My first bike came with Juicy 5s. They howled. Trying to get the brakes to "feel" the same was a fiasco - one lever was inevitably mushier, or traveled further, than the other. The gap between the rotors and pads was tiny and caused constant rubbing. This only worsened anytime a wheel was taken off and on, and necessitated constant realignment of the caliper. Headaches, headaches...

    So the LBS swapped them out for XT 775s, and it was a major improvement. I specifically had my sights set on this brake because it offered more clearance between the pads and rotors, and it made a difference. Rubbing problem solved. But, as others have mentioned, the pistons become sticky in cold weather, and that is a huge recipe for headaches.

    That bike was eventually sold and I built up a XC 29er on a very generous budget. I could have put any brake I wanted on it but chose BB7s, Speed Dial SL levers and full-length Jagwire Ripcord non-compression housing and cables. Unless you're a really heavy guy into big downhill runs, I don't see how you can't be satisfied with this set up.

    The brakes have plenty of power, and are quiet. Getting both levers to feel identical is child's play - they both feel very firm when the brakes begin to engage, and snap back. No mushiness or levers slow to retract here. And rubbing issues are non-issues because pad clearance is eliminated simply by turning a dial.

    You asked if there is a brake out there that is care free. I'd say that after your caliper alignment is set, which is easy, but critical, the BB7s come close. You do have to adjust for pad wear, which is so easy I don't understand why people complain about it. It takes far less time to adjust the pads than it does to put a few PSIs in your tires before a ride.

    I think for XC riding, nicehydros are nice, but overkill. I've heard Shimano may have fixed the cold weather problem with their XT brakes, but I'm not even tempted to replace my BB7s for them. One more thing - it's bliss working on my bike's brakes inside my heated home - BB7s are super adjustable and easy to work on, and no brake fluid to mess things up...

    Everything....Very well said. I'd have to agree 100%

  46. #46
    Lev
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    Just stumbled upon this thread and have a few questions. Was thinking about starting up a whole thread, but I guess it's relevant here too.

    I just got hooked up with a barely used set of Avid Elixir CRs and I was coming from some BB7s. I thought the BB7s were great, but I did have some issues with them. First, I was never able to get rid of the howl on the front wheel, no matter how much tampering with it I did. Not the biggest nuisance, but a nuisance nonetheless. Second, I had a heck of a time getting the calipers to grab on that sweet spot. As soon as I got it right, it would be wrong one ride later. I felt like I had a pretty good grasp of the mechanics of it, but it still got to be a nuisance keeping it dialed perfectly. Third, and most importantly, I just got sick of the "feel" of the brake. Coming off of two previous hydro systems, I just started to miss that soft, juicy feel of a hydro. I had run XTs and Juicy 7s prior.

    So enter my current situation. I just got back from my first ride on my Elixir CRs and my thoughts are luke warm. I'm really hoping this is just a break in issue, but there was hardly any bite at all, let alone not too much modulation either. All in all, the brakes just felt weak. On sections I'm used to bombing, I felt myself really taking it slow for fear of not being able to stop in time. To slow myself down, I was really having to pull hard on the lever. Being the brand new brake system and also the latest and greatest from Avid, I was definitely expecting more.

    Anyone else go through this with a new set of hydros? Sorry for the rant and potential thread jack, but I felt like it was relevant to the OPs question

    THanks for any insight folks!

  47. #47
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    Just stumbled upon this thread and have a few questions. Was thinking about starting up a whole thread, but I guess it's relevant here too.

    I just got hooked up with a barely used set of Avid Elixir CRs and I was coming from some BB7s. I thought the BB7s were great, but I did have some issues with them. First, I was never able to get rid of the howl on the front wheel, no matter how much tampering with it I did. Not the biggest nuisance, but a nuisance nonetheless. Second, I had a heck of a time getting the calipers to grab on that sweet spot. As soon as I got it right, it would be wrong one ride later. I felt like I had a pretty good grasp of the mechanics of it, but it still got to be a nuisance keeping it dialed perfectly. Third, and most importantly, I just got sick of the "feel" of the brake. Coming off of two previous hydro systems, I just started to miss that soft, juicy feel of a hydro. I had run XTs and Juicy 7s prior.

    So enter my current situation. I just got back from my first ride on my Elixir CRs and my thoughts are luke warm. I'm really hoping this is just a break in issue, but there was hardly any bite at all, let alone not too much modulation either. All in all, the brakes just felt weak. On sections I'm used to bombing, I felt myself really taking it slow for fear of not being able to stop in time. To slow myself down, I was really having to pull hard on the lever. Being the brand new brake system and also the latest and greatest from Avid, I was definitely expecting more.

    Anyone else go through this with a new set of hydros? Sorry for the rant and potential thread jack, but I felt like it was relevant to the OPs question

    THanks for any insight folks!

  48. #48
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    Lev, did you do a pad bedding in procedure? Because new pads on new rotors without bedding them in is a sure sign of poor braking performance.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc
    Lev, did you do a pad bedding in procedure? Because new pads on new rotors without bedding them in is a sure sign of poor braking performance.
    I actually did not spend a lot of time bedding them. Truth be told, I bent my r derailleur on the ride and had to cut it short. I think I need to spend a little more time on these to make a final call. the bleed on them feels good and there is a bite feel on the lever, just not on the bike Thanks for your help

  50. #50
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    are BB7's better than Tektro Auriga Pro Hydraulics?

    for XC riding, rider weight: Female @ 115lbs
    RH SL Pro

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by louisssss
    are BB7's better than Tektro Auriga Pro Hydraulics?

    for XC riding, rider weight: Female @ 115lbs
    In my opinion..YES!!! I have never had anything but problems with tektro disc systems. Ive only had mechanical IO's (which SUCK!!!), but one of the guys i know from the local races has tektro hydro discs (not sure which model), and he hates them. He probably weighs 160, and he said they are hard to adjust, and dont have much power or modulation. Like i said..ive never ridden them though so I cant say for sure

  52. #52
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    To be honest louisssss, if she is that light then Avid Single Digit 7's will likely be more than enough. My brother 330lbs also has these and they are great in terms of stopping power and are easy to install. The best part is they are very very cheap.


    Lev, I suggest you head down to your local hardware store and buy some really roungh sand paper, maybe 80 - 140 grit, I chose 80. Put your bike in the stand or flip it over and run the sand paper over the rotor, while you spin the wheel. Do this until you feel the paper has has a effect on the rotors, but don't go to far. Then wipe down the rotors with a clean rag and rubbing alcohol. It is also a good idea to rough up the pads a bit with the paper. Just make sure you clean everything thoroughly. Then when you are done do 50-70 hard but non wheel locking stops on each brake, give it a rest(let it cool) then do about 10 really hard but not locking stops per brake. Now ride normal, and you should get good performance.

  53. #53
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    Hayes stroker trail with at least 185mm rotors. Will be better than BB7's

  54. #54
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    I've ridden XC with BB7s for years on several bikes I've built. I use Avid Ultimate levers (bling!), XTR cables. Latest ride is a RIP9 with 180mm rotors in front, 160mm in back. I've often lusted after hydros, but the BB7s just plain work with little fuss, and I always end up spending money on some other upgrade or gear.

    You might try a couple of things before giving up. Clean the rotors as described a couple of posts back. And try Avid organic pads. They are quieter, better modulated and stop better. They wear out faster, but who cares. Make sure you cables slide easy in the housing. Test this by disconnecting the cable from the brake and pulling on it while working the lever. It should be smooth and easy, no rubbing sensation or noise whatsoever.

    Good luck!
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  55. #55
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    The OP fixed them 4 days ago, it's over, done, finished, and he is happy. Lets let this one go.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee
    The OP fixed them 4 days ago, it's over, done, finished, and he is happy. Lets let this one go.
    Yup. Missed it.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  57. #57
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    The cheapest way to get more power would be to put 203mm G2 rotors on but I don't know what you got now?? I have had elixir; bb7; code 5 and now hayes stroker trail. As far as which of these I would say go with would be the Hayes Trroker Trail. Make sure you get at least V7 rotors if you wanna try them and go to REI so if you don't like them you can swap them out for another.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Destin
    In my opinion..YES!!! I have never had anything but problems with tektro disc systems. Ive only had mechanical IO's (which SUCK!!!), but one of the guys i know from the local races has tektro hydro discs (not sure which model), and he hates them. He probably weighs 160, and he said they are hard to adjust, and dont have much power or modulation. Like i said..ive never ridden them though so I cant say for sure
    I have had both bb7's and tektro auriga comps. I rode the bb7's for about four years and only had the aurigas for about 6 months but they feel very simalar to me in power. the tektros have more modulation though. I had to adjust my bb7's after every ride, never had to touch the tektro's (yet) I do have a 180mm disc with the tektro's which im sure helps. they are just as powerful as my friends stroker trails and shamano xt's. bb7's are good brakes. tektros auriga are comparible i would say. both have pros and cons and both work well if set up correctly. comparing either of them to tektro mechanicals is an unfair. thats like comparing a trek to a walgoose

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