Avid Nomenclature/differences- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    I don't climb, I walk
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    Avid Nomenclature/differences

    Hi all. I just started riding this year and have been considering upgrading from my Juicy 5 brake set. Thing is I'm not sure how the Juicy's compare to Code's or Elixirs etc.

    I was wondering if anyone can share the differences between the Avid Product lines. Looking at their site now it appears the Juicy line is going away?

    Thanks, Joe

  2. #2
    aka bOb
    Reputation: bdundee's Avatar
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    What the heck is a Nomenclature!!!

  3. #3
    I don't climb, I walk
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee
    What the heck is a Nomenclature!!!

    Naming system i.e. Juicy vs. Code

  4. #4
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    Juicy is replaced by elixir, they are an XC type brake which will survive (with larger rotors to light FR use.

    Code is the dedicated FR and DH brake

    Avid used to use numbers for model designation. 3,5,7 with the higher number designating a more feature packed/lighter brake. The elixir uses 5, R, CR, CR mag, XX as their model names
    Rimmer - "There's an old human saying - if you talk garbage, expect pain"

  5. #5
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    Elixir 5 is an elixir caliper with a juicy 5 lever.
    Elixir R has an updated lever with reach adjust.
    Elixir CR has the same updated lever with reach and pad contact adjustment.
    Elixir CR mag is the Elixir CR with some magnesium bits.
    The XX brake is a super light version of the elixir.

    The Code has a beefy lever designed for fr/dh use (breakaway lever design/ball bearing lever pivots) with a 4 piston caliper.
    The code 5 is a juicy lever with the code caliper.
    Build.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by schneidie
    Elixir 5 is an elixir caliper with a juicy 5 lever.
    Elixir R has an updated lever with reach adjust.
    Elixir CR has the same updated lever with reach and pad contact adjustment.
    Elixir CR mag is the Elixir CR with some magnesium bits.
    The XX brake is a super light version of the elixir.

    The Code has a beefy lever designed for fr/dh use (breakaway lever design/ball bearing lever pivots) with a 4 piston caliper.
    The code 5 is a juicy lever with the code caliper.
    How about the Juicy 3.5?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renovatio
    How about the Juicy 3.5?
    The 3.5 is an OEM only bake that came pretty much only on complete bikes. Any 3.5s that you would find are likely pull offs from a bike that the buy wanted upgraded brakes on. And in sticking with the old Avid numbering system, a 3.5 would be lower end than your current J5s.

    What makes you want to "upgrade" from your Juicy 5s? The J5 is the exact same brake as the J7 but with out the adjuster on the master cylinder. They work well from every riding style up to and including All Mountain, and as AlexRandall noted, they'll even work for light Free Ride. If you are thinking that you need more power out of them, try going to a larger rotor, or changing pad materials. The J5 is a pretty solid and reliable brake. I'd run em till they died and then think about upgrades. I'd also give the Elixrs a little time. They're new this year and a brand new product (the new master cylinder) can have teething problems so to speak.

    Anyway, your choice of course. What to go with just depends on your riding style.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  8. #8
    I don't climb, I walk
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    I was thinking about upgrading because it seemed like they were lacking a bit of stopping power. The Juicy 5's are my first set of disc brakes(just got back into riding after a 10yr absence), and they just felt weak compared to the old V-brakes I rode(and those weren't even top-line). Granted I only have about 50miles on the 5's now. Do pads need a brief break-in period? Seems like the Juicy 5's are pretty good brakes, and I'm not really doing any extreme descents or aggressive riding so maybe I just need to get used to them. Joe

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by JTK37
    I was thinking about upgrading because it seemed like they were lacking a bit of stopping power. The Juicy 5's are my first set of disc brakes(just got back into riding after a 10yr absence), and they just felt weak compared to the old V-brakes I rode(and those weren't even top-line). Granted I only have about 50miles on the 5's now. Do pads need a brief break-in period? Seems like the Juicy 5's are pretty good brakes, and I'm not really doing any extreme descents or aggressive riding so maybe I just need to get used to them. Joe
    Got to remember that your "rotor" on your rim brake is 20" bigger than what you have now, so the rim brakes can put out more stopping power because of a larger lever All brake pads need some kind of break in, n # of hard stops should do it where n=10,20,30+++.

    You may want to bump up in rotor size, 180 in the front seem sufficent for more people, 203 if you're DH or a clyde.

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