AVID JUICY 5 issues. Bleed procedure, overfill etc.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    AVID JUICY 5 issues. Bleed procedure, overfill etc.

    I just picked up a pair of Juicy 5's for my Transition and I'm having a few issues.

    First, the front brake felt pretty bad at the time of install. Basically very spongy and the lever would pull in basically all the way to the handle bar grip.

    Second, the rear brake was the complete opposite, super tight, little lever travel, but would not open enough to allow the rotor to insert. A friend of mine had the same issue with his 5's and we decided they overfilled the system at the time of "assembly"

    I head to the LBS and grab an avid bleed kit. Follow the instructions *exactly* but the procedure seems very odd. Mind you, I'm used to bleeding automotive brakes..

    Anyhow, after the whole procedure they still feel pretty spongy, but they are slightly improved. I'm wondering if I need to repeat the procedure multiple times..

    Also how long typically does it take for the rotors/pads to bed properly? I have been on 2 rides now with moderate braking and still don't feel as though they are biting properly.

    Lastly, the instructions are laid out for Juicy 7's specifically. Does anyone know of any variation in the procedure for 5's vs. 7's??

  2. #2
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    You didn't bleed correctly. The Avid bleed instructions are a little bit vague, and it's a bit difficult if you've never bled them before. But really, it's quite a good system.

    Yes, you're rear sounds overfilled. You can just open the bleed screw at the lever, and then with the port open, push the pistons back into their bores. This will force any excess fluid out.

    The only difference with the J7s is that you need to dial the knob to the full out position. Obviously you don't do this for the J5s. But it's all the same otherwise.

    Try sanding your pads in a figure 8 pattern. And then do 30 to 40 hard break-in stops. Or some people will tell you to ride down some moderate grades while dragging your brake.

  3. #3
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    If your brakes still feel spongy, take the wheel/rotor out and pump the lever a couple times so the pads are closer together, then bleed the brake. This effectively creates more room for fluid in the system, behind the piston. Just make sure you leave the pads far enough apart so you can get a flathead between them to create more room after the bleed if you need to, to get rid of rotor rub. If they still rub, then loosen the lever bleed screw and push the pads apart again.

  4. #4
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