Avid elixir R SL- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Avid elixir R SL

    So these brakes came stock on my 2010 stumpy comp 29er and other than the lack of pad contact adjustment, I am very happy with them. That being said, the pads have worn down a bit and I have to much play in the levers for my liking. I can adjust for the reach but I still want the pads closer to the rotors. Is there any way to shim the pads or adjust them manually?

    MrR

  2. #2
    TRANCER
    Reputation: Biohazard74's Avatar
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    I was going to ask this as well the other day. Inquiring minds wanna know.
    Ride

  3. #3
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    just taking a stab here but would pumping the levers slightly with the rotors out of the brakes center them further inward? I know others have done this for hayes strokers.

  4. #4
    How much does it weigh?
    Reputation: Borgschulze's Avatar
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    Should be auto-adjusting.

  5. #5
    Rollin 29s
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    The only way they could come back away from the rotor is if your spring is so firm that it is pulling the pads back. I don't see that flimsy little spring having enough umph to do that though.
    Whoever invented the bicycle deserves the thanks of humanity.
    - Lord Charles Beresford

  6. #6
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    The pads retract every time the lever is released.

  7. #7
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    This is my first set of hydros so pardon my ignorance.

    I don't believe the pads are self adjusting as after a hard ride I often have to shift the calipers around a bit to get rid of any rubbing. I assume that with self adjusting calipers I wouldn't have to do this???

    Of course the pads do retract after activating the brakes. I dont think I would get very far down the trail if this didnt occur.

    I have noticed over time that as the pads have worn down, I have more play in the levers. Any way to adjust this manually??

    MrR

  8. #8
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    Reputation: RustyIron's Avatar
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    The o-ring seal on the caliper has a square cross section. The piston does not generally slide through the o-ring. Normally, when you pull the lever and the piston moves outward, the o-ring deforms so the cross section is a somewhat distorted parallelogram. When you release pressure, the parallelogram returns to its square state, pulling the piston back with it.

    As wear occurs on the pads, the piston must travel a little further before it is stopped by the disc. The the o-ring distorts to a maximum amount, and the piston is pushed out a little further past the o-ring. When the pressure is released, the o-ring pulls the piston back, but the piston does not slide inward past the o-ring.

    The whole system is dependent upon just right amount of friction and freeness. If one side is a little sticky, it will adversely affect the other side. If the o-rings get hard, or if there is stickiness where they touch the pistons, self-adjustment will be a little off, or they won't pull back properly.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnigro
    just taking a stab here but would pumping the levers slightly with the rotors out of the brakes center them further inward? I know others have done this for hayes strokers.
    This worked on my Elixir CR's to get the initial setup how i liked them. If you pump the lever too far and can not get the rotor in, use a flat blade screw driver to push the calipers out. I also then bled the brakes to start from scratch but you may not need to do this.

  10. #10
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    The bleed kit comes with a "bleed block". The other end of the bleed block is labeled "pad spacer". With the wheel removed, squeeze the brake lever so the pads move close to each other. Push the pad spacer into the top of the caliper (the same way the pads go in). They will then be perfectly spaced for the rotors.

    Not sure if you can buy the bleed block seperately and not sure why the brake sets themselves do not come with them.

  11. #11
    TRANCER
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris1911
    The bleed kit comes with a "bleed block". The other end of the bleed block is labeled "pad spacer". With the wheel removed, squeeze the brake lever so the pads move close to each other. Push the pad spacer into the top of the caliper (the same way the pads go in). They will then be perfectly spaced for the rotors.

    Not sure if you can buy the bleed block seperately and not sure why the brake sets themselves do not come with them.
    I bought some Elixer R's on Ebay brand new that came with the blocks. Front and back. I guess it all depends where you buy them maybe?
    Ride

  12. #12
    Meh.
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    They are not self-adjusting in the sense that they will automatically center themselves over the rotor. They are self-adjusting in the sense that the pistons will pump out to compensate for pad wear.

    If you remove the rotor from between the pads and squeeze the lever a bit, the pistons should pump out. They will retract, but they will not retract all the way back into their bores. After the pistons pump out, put the wheel back on. The lever throw should now be reduced.

    I prefer my levers to pull a bit closer to the bars anyways. The hand has more power and control further into the throw.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    If you remove the rotor from between the pads and squeeze the lever a bit, the pistons should pump out. They will retract, but they will not retract all the way back into their bores. After the pistons pump out, put the wheel back on. The lever throw should now be reduced.
    This is the method I now use with my Avid brakes

  14. #14
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    Hi All,
    Is there a definite reason why the R SLs do not compensate for pad wear?? The should, as they are an open system. ie a reservoir.... Im having the same issue with the lever coming gradually closer to the bar as the pads wear.... Its a nuisance having to re-bleed them or pump them out with disc removed..... No like...
    Thanks....
    Kev....

  15. #15
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    Sounds like pumping a bit more fluid into the system will work. I had to do this on my hayes 9s to get a nice quick lever feel. But when you put new pads in you will have to get some of that fluid out of the system.

  16. #16
    TRANCER
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    I'm doing it how fueledbymetal described and it's worked great. Once you work out the details with these brakes I must admit that they have become some of my faves.
    Ride

  17. #17
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    I'll give it a go!!! Thanks lads!!
    Kev...

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