203mm front/160mm rear: bad idea?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    203mm front/160mm rear: bad idea?

    Hello Peoples,

    is there any reason not to have the rotor sizes mismatched as above? I'm pulling the wheelset from one of my bikes over onto another bike. The problem is that the rear wheel has a center lock hub so I can't swap over the the rotor. I'm planning on buying a 180mm rotor for it, but don't really want to spend the money at least until after the holidays. I'm not really planning on much riding, but I'd like to get in a day or two. Will it be too unbalanced? If it makes a difference, the calipers are Avid code 5.

    -joel

  2. #2
    IdontShootPeopleAnyMore
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    your bike will explode
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  3. #3
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    just wondering if it'll be horribly unbalanced.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jojotherider
    Hello Peoples,

    is there any reason not to have the rotor sizes mismatched as above? I'm pulling the wheelset from one of my bikes over onto another bike. The problem is that the rear wheel has a center lock hub so I can't swap over the the rotor. I'm planning on buying a 180mm rotor for it, but don't really want to spend the money at least until after the holidays. I'm not really planning on much riding, but I'd like to get in a day or two. Will it be too unbalanced? If it makes a difference, the calipers are Avid code 5.

    -joel
    Get a Centerlock to 6-bolt adapter from Shimano or DT Swiss. They work great.

    For a day or two of riding, I would just deal with it.
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  5. #5
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    I run a 203mm front 160 mm rear all the time, no problems at all.

    Well it took a day or two to get used to the front one, after the change.

    Havn't cooked a brake since the change.

  6. #6
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    I have that combo on my bike and it works fine

  7. #7
    NWS
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    I went from 180/160 to 203/160 deliberately, and it worked out just like I'd hoped. I didn't like squeezing the front lever twice as hard as the rear lever just to get the right balance of braking at each end. I still pull a little harder on the front, but it's much closer now. I expect to do the same thing on my next bike.

  8. #8
    MEGALOMANIAC
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    I ride 180mm up front and 160mm out back. I squeeze the levers with even pressure when I really need to stop fast, otherwise I am feathering either of them to help to get the bike to react under control over technical terrain.
    life is... "All About Bikes"...

  9. #9
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    ok, great. thanks for the responses. looks like it comes down to rider control. I'm going to roll with the 160mm for a bit and see how i like it. if I don't, well, then i'll switch it up.

    -joel

  10. #10
    NWS
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    Quote Originally Posted by ambassadorhawg
    I ride 180mm up front and 160mm out back. I squeeze the levers with even pressure when I really need to stop fast [...]
    For me, that meant either locking up the rear or only using half of the braking that the front could provide. Pulling a lot harder on the front than the rear solved both problems, but it just felt wrong... hence the 203/160 setup now.

  11. #11
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    Worked for me ok.

  12. #12
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    I have seen this question asked in various MTB magazines . The answer usually involves that a 200mm plus rotor puts a lot of stress on the fork legs. They recommend looking down while braking to see how much the fork legs flexes. The advice given is to only use them on forks designed for them usually dual crown forks.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitzikatzi
    I have seen this question asked in various MTB magazines . The answer usually involves that a 200mm plus rotor puts a lot of stress on the fork legs. They recommend looking down while braking to see how much the fork legs flexes. The advice given is to only use them on forks designed for them usually dual crown forks.
    On my single crown Magura Wotan you can not mount anything less the 203mm rotor, period. Post mounts are only for this size. Buit then this particular fork is very very stiff, with its dual arches and all..

    I would expect that pretty much all 160mm and larger single crown forks will do just fine with 203mm.

    I have switched the rear disk to 180mm eventually, but went with a less grippy lightweight rotor - seems like about the same amount of stopping power as I had with Shimano's 160, about the same weight - but easier to modulate.

  14. #14
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    I have the 203 front/160 back setup with the Talas RC2 160mm fork and Elixir CRs. Works just fine.

  15. #15
    tma
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    Shimano Saints M810 levers & calipers.
    203/160 rotors.

    = AWESOME!
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  16. #16
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    Just be conscious to not cook the rear disc and get a 180 before you do any long, steep descents.
    Keep the Country country.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitzikatzi
    I have seen this question asked in various MTB magazines . The answer usually involves that a 200mm plus rotor puts a lot of stress on the fork legs. They recommend looking down while braking to see how much the fork legs flexes. The advice given is to only use them on forks designed for them usually dual crown forks.
    Most forks these days are cleared for 203mm rotors, even Fox's short travel XC forks. With the increasing use of through axles, it becomes less of an issue.

    The bigger issue is that in this scenario, bushing play is exacerbated by folks who don't service their forks often enough. That's where real problems start.
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