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  1. #1
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    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear

    Just finished my first frame pack and it is harder than it looks and I learned a lot, made a few mistakes but hey thats part of learning.
    ilovebikes.blogspot.com

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    First Bag

    Hey there BikePackingDude,
    Yea it can get a little tricky in some areas. Cool thing about sewing is that you can undo most of what went wrong and try again without to much damage to the material. Yea, keep it up, the more you put these things together the better you become at it and the easier it gets. Time for you to make a Handlebar pack and then a Seat Pack. Put up some pics if you can.
    T-manTorin
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  3. #3
    SpoK Werks Handmade Goods
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikepackingdude View Post
    Just finished my first frame pack and it is harder than it looks and I learned a lot, made a few mistakes but hey thats part of learning.
    While tough, it gives you a great feeling of accomplishment when you're done and use your bag, doesn't it? It definitely gives you a better feel for what bag makers go through with every bag. Doing exactly the same thing is how I got started making bags for other people and now it's what I do almost every day.

    Like T-Man... I'd like to see a photo or two.

  4. #4
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    Yeah it was a fun project and I am going to make a handlebar bag and a seat bag this winter. I am trying to post a photo but it wont upload, I am a dork with no computer skills at all lol. I will post it on my blog
    ilovebikes.blogspot.com

  5. #5
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    here it is finally!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-img_1785.jpg  

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    ... and if we just ...

    Dude.... it looks good. What material did you use? In the photo, it looks like a softshell material of some sort. Let us know how it works out for you.

  7. #7
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    Thank you 1 Speed. I did use some soft shell material for the flat parts that hit the frame and on the bottom of the hook and loop (velcro) and the main body of the pack I used 1000d Cordura.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-dscf0008.jpg  

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  8. #8
    R.I.P. Pugsley.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikepackingdude View Post
    Thank you 1 Speed. I did use some soft shell material for the flat parts that hit the frame and on the bottom of the hook and loop (velcro) and the main body of the pack I used 1000d Cordura.
    Nice clean looking bag !
    And your dog looks like it's begging to go outside...

  9. #9
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    Love the helper too. My helper is a cat... she loves to lay on the fabric the second it hits a flat surface. Looks like it fits well. I'm curious about how the softshell material holds up, especially where it rubs bottle mounts and cable stops. There's way more vibration in a frame bag than you'd expect.

  10. #10
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    No he was tired and wanting to in the house we did a ride in the morning. I am curious about the soft shell material myself I will let you know how it holds up
    ilovebikes.blogspot.com

  11. #11
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    Great thread with good discussion.

  12. #12
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    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear

    Anybody ever make a sleeping bag?
    ilovebikes.blogspot.com

  13. #13
    A guy on a bike Moderator
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    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear

    Make your own bikepacking gear? Bike bags? Tarps?

    Share them here!

  14. #14
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    Not directly bikepacking related, but. . .

    Here is a hack that I did with a CO2 pump so that you can store the cartridge inside the body

    Here is my attempt at some "power grip" style pedalsThis honestly didn't work all that great but ehh it might inspire someone. . .

    I would love to make a frame bag and rack as well. hopefully sooner rather than later.

  15. #15
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    OT, but do you have any pics of your diy bags dream4est? Especially interested in your seat bag.

  16. #16
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    I made this seat bag as a dry bag "holster" Per Jerry W's plans at:

    Full DIY Bikepacking Kit

    As far as I know, it is the first bag made to work with a dropper post and get full drop without any tire rub on a full suspension frame. As pictured it clears at full compression fully dropped 5" (KS i950r).

    The differences from Jerrys drawings/pics are:

    Cut the side panels smaller to keep holster closer to saddle.
    Spilt velcro at front and placed high around seat post clamp are to avoid limiting full travel of post.
    The extra nylon strap of top cam buckle was left long, wrapped around saddle rails and back onto itself with velcro attachment.
    Extra strap/cam buckle not attached to holster that pulls dry bag to saddle. It is the grey strap in pic.

    The extra strap and extra length top cam buckle strap are needed to hold the bag in place as you cant use a post wrap front velcro attachment (like the single wrap on the Pika or the double wrap on the Viscacha) or the post will only drop an inch or two and the bag will be too low in design so it would rub the tire at full compression even if you could get the post to drop all the way "through" the velcro.

    Like JerryW I am using multiple sizes of dry bags to fit the intented application. Pictured is the medium bag rolled up with a smallish load.

    Total weight with dry bag and extra strap is 7.5 oz. Cost me about $8 to make if that. Volume fully loaded is about Pika level.
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  17. #17
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    Here is the rest.

    Frame bag is bolted to water bottle mounts and has a shock cord top tube mount. Super wide 3.5" flange, foam frame and mini cordura side rub panels. 4.5 oz
    Gas Tank is your basic gas tank. 1.8oz
    Faux harness is a stem bag in the shape of a beret that mounts to stem and has a nylon strap for front lower dry bag. Bag and dry bag weigh 4oz
    Upper front dry bag is kind of like a stuffable reverse harness. Twin nylon cam buckle straps mount it to lower dry bag and bars sandwiching cables in between. 3.5oz

    Material is black polyester, grey and orange silicone coated ripstop, blue cheap waterproof coated nylon and a little cordura in rub spots. Super light bags but hey I made them for AZT and CTR and I saved 1.25 lbs over the usual suspects gear.

    The point here is that while the guys who make the expensive stuff are worth every penny (the time involved is significant, a point that cannot be overlooked here), the bags cannot be dialed in to your bike with alterations and IMO dont feel perfect. Good but not an extension of my bike. IMO most of us should just bust out a cheap sewing machine (borrow your aunt's) and go to town. You will remember 8th grade all over again!
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    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-bike-bag2-006.jpg  

    Last edited by dream4est; 11-24-2012 at 10:10 PM.
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  18. #18
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    Hmmm, my saddle bag is based on the same design, but it likes to wobble all over when I have just my clothes in it (not more than 4 pounds, and deff smaller than the pica). Did you use any plastic stiffeners like Jerry? I did, and am wondering if that was a mistake. Thanks for the pics!

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    Fotooutdoors I would add the extra straps like I did. Mine went all over the place too, until I wrapped the top buckle strap around the seat rails and velcroed back onto itself at its base on the lower flap ( and then added the extra strap to tuck the bag hard into the rails). You might get by with just the second strap but I was getting side to side play until I did the first mod correctly-if you look I pull the strap around the front right seat rail, over to the left and around that, and then back to itself and velcro. The bag juts out to the right side (viewing from rear of bike), you then pull it back left to secure velcro. Real tight if you do it right and snug it at each step of the process.

    With a little practice I can get the top buckle strap off the seat rail, unbuckle the cam and be in the dry bag fast with the dry bag still snug to the seat rails with the second strap. Total access to the back half of the dry bag.

    edit- I did use plastic stiffeners. I just dont think Jerrys original strap design is enough to hold the bag tight. Once a little play develops the sway is pronounced.
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  20. #20
    I work in .001 tolerances
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    Lookin' good buddy!
    They'll only get better from here on out :thumbup:

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    Hey fotooutdoors here is another view of the bag with a bigger load. I used a black strap instead of the grey in previous pix to be the floating strap that tucks the bag into the rails. You can see my extra length of top cam buckle strap better as well. With the bigger load I just wrap it around the back seat rails simple style and back onto itself. The setup is bomber!! I can even go bigger than this with no movement at all.

    Good luck with your bag. I am sure you will tighten it up. My way is probably just an example.
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  22. #22
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    I like the seat bag that is going to be my next project
    ilovebikes.blogspot.com

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikepackingdude View Post
    I like the seat bag that is going to be my next project
    Same, that and a handlebar mount for a dry bag of similar design. The handlebar mount might come first simply because it's easier to do though :P

  24. #24
    ride more
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    Some cool diy stuff in here...

  25. #25
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    Took a shot at making some credit card touring bags for the road rig. Kind of a pain, but kind of fun too. Now onto the MTB frame bag, gas tank, and seatbag.

    Merry Christmas everyone!!


  26. #26
    gran jefe
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    i like those... nice work!

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    Great ideas here...right into what I am looking to do. Awesome stuff

  28. #28
    I work in .001 tolerances
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    Lots of good stuff in here!
    Here is my take on the SeatPak



    Lighter and simpler

  29. #29
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    That looks really good !
    More pics please.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rabies010 View Post
    That looks really good !
    More pics please.
    Thanks!
    Alright, here's are couple more: Weighed today in this config @ 220 grams, or .49 lbs

    Top side


    Underside daisy chain


    Internal. Red fabric is housing the plastic spine


    Side. Approx 14/15 litre capacity after rolling the end a min of 3 times
    Last edited by HomegrownMN; 01-11-2013 at 06:52 PM.

  31. #31
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    wow that's actually pretty awesome.... I do sewing on the side for tactical stuff...I definitely will look into making a few bags for my bikepacking rig so that I don't depend on my USGI stuff

  32. #32
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    Very cool dude that is what I need for sure! Your stuff is so cool I am alway in awe
    ilovebikes.blogspot.com

  33. #33
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    I am about to start work on 2nd versions of my bags. I made my front drybag system work with cables run above the drybag without a traditional harness. Previously I was running cables around the bag. The system works both ways now. No foam bumpers or spacers just a small velcro strap for the cables. Cables dont bunch or bind. Now on to a second version with a higher quality materials (VX21).
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  34. #34
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    Nice. I just started to pursue a handlebar 'burrito' style bag myself


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    I started a new thread here but was asked to copy it on this thread. So, here it is.

    Hi all,

    I made my own frame bag over the holidays and wanted to share my results. Thank you to those that previously posted about how they built theirs - hopefully someone finds my info helpful as well.

    The full write up is here on my blog (Bike Frame Bag Construction).



    This was a learning experience that I really enjoyed - particularly since I was doing the work inside the toasty warm house while the outside temps were less than toasty!

    I used Cordura 1000D and I think it was a good pick. I'm no expert and time will tell but it "feels" pretty good in terms of weight and strength.

    Now I'm onto a couple more accessories for a season of bikepacking!

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by HomegrownMN View Post
    Here is my take on the SeatPak
    This is VERY NICE HomeGrownMN! I think one of these is next on my list. Kinda scarey as it looks to be many orders of magnitude more complex than a frame bag. Thanks for sharing your photos!

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    1000D cordura is more than good enough! I use it myself for ammo pouches, and it is sturdier than the older LBE pack material that is looking good!

    the only worry is the strength of stitching and thread; I hope you used a #18 needle and a thread rated "Heavy Duty" ? (or at least 69 pounds tensile strength) for stitch strength with 1000D; somewhere between 2 mm and 3mm straight line stitch length should be strong enough. (similar to USGI spec for pack stitching) and double stitching as well....as for zig zags, I can't remember offhand the specs needed for the maximum strength...

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDNM View Post
    This is VERY NICE HomeGrownMN! I think one of these is next on my list. Kinda scarey as it looks to be many orders of magnitude more complex than a frame bag. Thanks for sharing your photos!
    Thanks.
    It is as complex as a frame bag and possibly more. Don't worry, you're seeing the 5th version Lots of prototyping here

  39. #39
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    Can a saddle bag handle, pair of size 12 shoes and a helmet?

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yogii View Post
    Can a saddle bag handle, pair of size 12 shoes and a helmet?
    Shoes inside for sure. I've done it commuting with my work/riding shoes.
    Helmet, not inside. But can easily be strapped on top/off the back and made to work

  41. #41
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    Bracket I made to hold my pump water filter. It could also be used for a cook kit(cup/stove/propane) or an oversized water bottle.



    Uses bottle cage mounts to bolt to the frame Its way overbuilt with aluminum 3/16"x3/4" spine and 1/8" bands, foam to cushion the contents and velcro straps attached by speedy rivets.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CamoDeafie View Post
    the only worry is the strength of stitching and thread; I hope you used a #18 needle and a thread rated "Heavy Duty" ? (or at least 69 pounds tensile strength) for stitch strength with 1000D; somewhere between 2 mm and 3mm straight line stitch length should be strong enough.
    Wow! That is more like chord! I used T70 thread from RockyWoods.com which, according to their website, is rated at 11 lbs tensile strength. I think I could run a bit heavier thread thru my machine but not THAT heavy!! :-) Sounds like I probably used a heavier than necessary fabric.

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    Finishing up some gear for my wife and I for our TNGA trip next month.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JDNM View Post
    Wow! That is more like chord! I used T70 thread from RockyWoods.com which, according to their website, is rated at 11 lbs tensile strength. I think I could run a bit heavier thread thru my machine but not THAT heavy!! :-) Sounds like I probably used a heavier than necessary fabric.

    excuse me. my honest mistake, I kept thinking Size 69 (or govt size E) is 69# (probably has to do with fishing line being rated as weight....)

    I just looked up Nylon 69 specs and indeed it is rated at 11 pounds tensile; so basically your thread is correct for the material!

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    Quote Originally Posted by CamoDeafie View Post
    excuse me. my honest mistake, I kept thinking Size 69 (or govt size E) is 69# (probably has to do with fishing line being rated as weight....)

    I just looked up Nylon 69 specs and indeed it is rated at 11 pounds tensile; so basically your thread is correct for the material!
    No worries. Good to hear that I was using the right thread - even the losers get lucky sometimes! :-)

  46. #46
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    Something different...

    This is not the place to discuss gun control/laws/feelings/opinions. I don't even own a sidearm fwiw. Ok.

    This is a piece for an L.E.O that likes to carry his sidearm whilst biking/commuting.
    A little departure from the norm, but I know there are plenty here and elsewhere that
    either have the permits to carry or are required to carry in the backcountry. (aka Alaska)
    The hard part is making this somewhat 'universal' since I don't have the bike here. After some contemplation I decided the MOLLE system would be perfect and adaptable. It's padded with ~.25" of closed cell foam and has a water-resistant, but easy to open zipper.
    Here you are:





    MOLLE





  47. #47
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    that is a nice idea indeed; but my concern now is the velcro concept....what I would go for would be the LEO duty belt keepers; they include a line 24 snap button that will hold the weight better than just velcro; and this will help if the velcro should fail... otherwise, your pouch looks pretty good!
    where it is legal to open carry, people do so, even on bicycles; I have seen more than a few examples of sidearms on bicycles; mostly on the belt of the person riding, sometimes attached to the handlebars; and then there is the rifle rigs I've seen on hunters who uses MTBs for hunting rather than hiking....most commonly I see them with the ATV handlebar rack holding a rifle across the handlebar; they usually are paired with a small trailer to carry the meat out, as well as panniers to balance out the handling from what I've seen... I personally think an older style of scabbard parallel to the fork would be a better system as it brings weight down closer to center of gravity; but it might not be workable for those who have suspension forks. gun laws/control discussion is not to be brought up here I agree.

  48. #48
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    Looks perfectly suitable for stashing stuff other than a handgun. A pair of them would have more capacity than a fuel tank, I think. No interference with pedaling?

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by CamoDeafie View Post
    that is a nice idea indeed; but my concern now is the velcro concept....what I would go for would be the LEO duty belt keepers; they include a line 24 snap button that will hold the weight better than just velcro
    To be honest. I think the MOLLE stitching would fail before the velcro came undone. As long as you get a good wrap around, it's amazingly strong.

    Quote Originally Posted by random walk View Post
    Looks perfectly suitable for stashing other stuff other than a handgun. A pair of them would have more capacity than a fuel tank, I think. No interference with pedaling?
    You are correct on uses other than a sidearm. This one was specifically for that purpose though. Not sure on capacity, but it'd be close.
    No interference whilst pedaling around the neighborhood. I could see potential issues if one were standing and hammering on a climb, but I'm guessing the user isn't standing and climbing much.

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    hmm interesting. I see that you have double stitched the MOLLE webbing; I know there is a product that is rather expensive, but would be excellent for two of these pouches; its Tactical Tailor's MALICE clip; it requires the use of a screwdriver or tool to undo; basically a 1" wide X 3-5" long Zip Tie.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by CamoDeafie View Post
    hmm interesting. I see that you have double stitched the MOLLE webbing; I know there is a product that is rather expensive, but would be excellent for two of these pouches; its Tactical Tailor's MALICE clip; it requires the use of a screwdriver or tool to undo; basically a 1" wide X 3-5" long Zip Tie.
    It's actually quad stitched at the least. I don't want that to ever be a problem.

    I had to look up the MALICE clip. Thats a cool idea.
    I'm familiar with the metal version, but I like the idea of the plastic ones. At least it would deter a few people

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    oh wow, quad stitching...heavy duty for sure the metal version really don't do well with bike frames lol since they come undone way too easily; but MOLLE/MALICE systems is a great way to make bags/stuff compatible not just on bicycles but also gear and equipment..I've seen people put MOLLE panels on their vehicles for carrying items like first aid kits, tools, equipment for camping/off roading; and I have to say, it is a cleaner way of doing things with less weight as opposed to making drawers/racks/containers to hold the same things. I am looking forward to more stuff from you! I might make myself a burrito handlebar thing with the webbing I have....got the same design but scaled down from the USGI compression stuff sack.... we'll see!

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    Sweet stuff, I've been creepin this thread for a while. I wish I could sew!

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    I checked another frame bag off the list. This one is much smaller but every little bit of space helps! More details here on my blog.




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    Well I made a second set of bags and went full X-Pac instead of lightweight silnylon or ripstop. I got some really light finished products as the X-pac sits up so well it requires few second layers or third layer stiffeners. Used some Molle webbing attachments and shock cord mounting as I hate mad straps/velcro everywhere. Oh and made the seat bag a zippered version of the drybag style. Throw in some Molle style 1 liter bottle holders and the AZT 750 setup is about there.
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  56. #56
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    that is a sweet rig!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by dream4est View Post
    Well I made a second set of bags and went full X-Pac instead of lightweight silnylon or ripstop.
    Very nice!! I love the bottle holder! Can you post some more photos of your seat bag please? I'd like to make one myself but keep putting it off as I suspect it is a lot of work!

  58. #58
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    DIY feedbags. Large enough to hold a 32oz Nalgene bottle. I attach them to handlebars & stem with a long length of paracord, although velcro one-wrap or zip-ties would also work.

    The hi-vis interior makes it easy to see what's inside.

    Construction steps available here.


  59. #59
    gran jefe
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    Quote Originally Posted by dream4est View Post
    Well I made a second set of bags and went full X-Pac instead of lightweight silnylon or ripstop. I got some really light finished products as the X-pac sits up so well it requires few second layers or third layer stiffeners. Used some Molle webbing attachments and shock cord mounting as I hate mad straps/velcro everywhere. Oh and made the seat bag a zippered version of the drybag style. Throw in some Molle style 1 liter bottle holders and the AZT 750 setup is about there.
    Finally a rig that looks like it has enough storage space to bring your gear and your food. Many of the others look like you choose one or the other. Nice work!

  60. #60
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    great ideas

  61. #61
    I work in .001 tolerances
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    Finished my handlebar Pak over the weekend. I've been spending lots of time dialing in the mounting
    hardware and orientation. After many versions, I believe this design to be superior.
    Main 'burrito' style pak with external zippered pocket. The external pocket is internally divided and has the
    mesh on the outside.
    This will be seeing some time on the AZT300 race next month

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-dsc02525.jpg

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  62. #62
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    This is awesome. I'm horrible at sewing but it'd be worth leveling up my skills to make my own bike packs.

  63. #63
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    Made a frame bag for my SS. Thinking about making some more!Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-frame-bag-004.jpg

  64. #64
    I work in .001 tolerances
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    Well done sir. They are especially nice on a SS

    Noticed your hose was quite long and thought I'd offer up one of my solutions http://forums.mtbr.com/bikepacking-b...se-839629.html

    Many of us find it quite delightful these days
    Last edited by HomegrownMN; 03-13-2013 at 09:55 PM.

  65. #65
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    I actually extended the camelbak tube to make it long enough to drink from(long torso I guess). It is the perfect length now and I saw somebody using something similar, here is a video of the set-up https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICF3cB45naw

    I made another one for a buddy. Just curious of what machine you guys are using?

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-med.-surly-karate-monkey-tony.jpg

  66. #66
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    I was inspired by you guys to try to make my own bag. I made a pattern, bought some fabric, and sent it off to the mom's house for a little sewing action. (She really should get all the credit) Turned out ok, I think. For under $10, it will surely work for at least one trip.
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  67. #67
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    nice stuff

    Quote Originally Posted by HomegrownMN View Post
    Finished my handlebar Pak over the weekend. I've been spending lots of time dialing in the mounting
    hardware and orientation. After many versions, I believe this design to be superior.
    Main 'burrito' style pak with external zippered pocket. The external pocket is internally divided and has the
    mesh on the outside.
    This will be seeing some time on the AZT300 race next month

    Click image for larger version. 

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    How to make this nice stuff ,can you send me the instruction ?

  68. #68
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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by dremags View Post
    Made a frame bag for my SS. Thinking about making some more!Click image for larger version. 

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    Really nice looking bike!

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by dream4est View Post
    Well I made a second set of bags and went full X-Pac...
    Total overkill Personally I'd go much lighter.. less is MORE.

  70. #70
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    Name:  leila birthday-bike bags summer 2013 084.JPG
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Size:  78.0 KBMade some new gear. TX-07 X-Pac Summer Rain Pogies!! This time I tried the TX-07 with the white side out, to see how that handles abrasions/elements. The grey side does okay, better than anything in its weight class, but I think the white side may be better for durability.
    I also made some VX-21 waterproof shoe covers in dark grey. No pix yet. Still drying the seam sealant.
    Going to do some more testing in the CTR next week. Still looking to market my designs but need more R+D.
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  71. #71
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    Handmade shoe covers. I was about to buy some but the prices and quality out there are a joke. These rock compared to what I have owned in the past fit wise. Dont fall off my feet walking around or hikeabike.Name:  bikebagsjuly13 004.JPG
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  72. #72
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    Simple Top Tube Bag Build

    Did this last night while I was watching the TDF ITT stage. Just simple hand stitching, no machine needed. Relatively easy way to create either a gas tank (front) or jerry can (rear) top tube bag.

    Used a 3x4x6 (72cubic inch) cosmetic bag that I saved from being thrown out. Cut off the handle it had on the top lid. The thicker 'rubberized' material and piping trim give it rigidity. Added some sticky-back velcro loop pieces to the inside, just to make sure the case material didn't have issues when stitching it all together.

    Tested it out and it works great. Can be attached either horizontally or vertically. Sure it will serve me well for many years, if not decades. Looks wonderfully funky too, so it goes well with all the other homemade, inventive gear I've made.
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  73. #73
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    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear

    Great idea. I love finding things to repurpose like that. I'm trying to find the right small pack to modify and use on my handlebars. The search continues.

  74. #74
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    i've just started on this long, but interesting path...





    here is a post about where i am up to so far...
    M.Y.O.G | drj0nswanderings
    For a rock steady Gas Tank bag > the DeWidget

    bit.ly/BuyDeWidget

    https://www.instagram.com/drj0n_bagworks/

  75. #75
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    MYOG S24O under top tube bag and saddle bag...

    Learning. | drj0nswanderings

    For a rock steady Gas Tank bag > the DeWidget

    bit.ly/BuyDeWidget

    https://www.instagram.com/drj0n_bagworks/

  76. #76
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    For bikepacking...and might just replace the Camelbak too!

    Did up a few new bags over the last couple weeks. Went up to UT for a few days, and even though I passed on doing a BP trek, I tested out the new bags through a couple trail riding days. Yeah, the bags will work well in a bikepacking setup, but, after finishing the testing, I think I'm changing my setup even for extended trail rides. Riding like this, the back felt wonderful after 4 hours of slickrock and rocky trail riding.

    All three packs (gas tank, jerry bag and frame bag) are just made of simple packcloth, sport zippers and 1.25" overlapped and outside stitched velcro.

    Not worried about the fact that they are not waterproof: They can essentially be made so at any time and no problem to seal things in ziplocs. A brief, passing shower is one thing, but for a multitude of reasons, I'll just pass on doing a trek if there is likely to be wet weather setting in.

    Gas tank: 2x3x8 for 48 cubic inch volume. Carried a bandana, snacks, keys, camera and a headlamp.

    Jerry bag: 2.5x3.5x6.5 tapering to 8 for 64 cubic inch volume. Carried a spare tube, my trail tools and more snacks. A 4oz Isopro canister will easily fit in there with a tube and the tools.

    Frame bag: 15.5x6x19 triangle by 3 wide for ~300 cubic inch volume. Carried my Camelbak bladder, tire pump and shock pump. Just left the front open for a tube port, which works great. Tied a couple zip-ties to the frame and used another on the bladder tube to attach a visitor pass clip thing to make a tube holder. The tube length was fine and can be extended more by not routing all the way around the head tube.

    For an all-day, dawn to dusk riding option, I'd like to make another pack to fit down the back side of the seatpost and be a vertical seatbag. Something about the size of the jerry bag (2.5x3.5x8). With that, it would allow the carrying of a water filter, additional food and drink powders, at least. I can still make room in the frame pack to add in a long sleeve jersey or light windbreaker.
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    Last edited by DesertDog; 09-29-2013 at 11:41 PM.

  77. #77
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    I have been testing some newer models lately. New Front harness and gas tank. About to make all new bags as well- will post again when I am done.




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  78. #78
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    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear

    My attempt.









    The frame pack has built in Velcro specifically to hold my hennessey rain fly. The front bag is a super simple roll top dryish bag that I secured with para cord and Canadian jam knots. The gas tank was an afterthought. I put Velcro on top of the Velcro that attached the frame pack. So the gas tank does not work solo.



    Sent from my hammock
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  79. #79
    I work in .001 tolerances
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    Re: Make Your Own Bikepacking gear

    ^ Nice Paul!

    They'll only get better from here on out :thumbup:

  80. #80
    gran jefe
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    good work, paul, AND you made me go look up "canadian jam knot". good stuff.

  81. #81
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    While not quite "bikepacking" per se, I modified these bags to fit the current rack I have; yes I know the rack seems way too close to the seat post area, and the location of the bags seems way too close to the brake arms...I am aware of that, and so far they work OK.. the bags have reinforcing panels, some sort of thin plastic, and had ribbon ties...I paid $4 each for them from a thrift store...and sewed on straps and snaps, similar type to what I use for MOLLE gear, they are marked "ARTISTRY" and I looked up the name; seems they were for make-up kits.....but hey, they're right size/shape, and have reinforced backs and fronts, so they made for good cheap panniers....and they can hold 2x 1 gallon bottles of water...more weight than I would realistically put in, but the space's there.... now the next thing to do is make a frame bag, or a handlebar bag... or put snaps on the corners of the flaps to secure them.


    CamoDeafie's Tactical gear and bike-packing blog-
    http://sbtactical.wordpress.com/

  82. #82
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    stove pipe seat bag and sling

    First of all my hat is off to all the fine work here on this thread
    Here is my take on the seat pack and bar sling. I wanted to make something that would sit a bit lower on the seat post without extending out beyond the seat too far.
    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-bag2.jpg
    The bag holds the equivalent to a 20 liter stuff sack.Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-bag3.jpg
    I used a pice of silver rip stop for the upper top of the bag and 500 d cordura for the rest of the bag.
    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-bag4.jpg
    the bar sling is super basic, two bar loops with a daisy chain for the stem and 3 buckles to keep it all tight.
    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-sling1.jpg
    I took it out for a "shake down" ride this am and I'm happy with the results. What seems good and tight at the house can be a different story on the trail.
    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-bag1.jpg
    All in all super it was a fun project and I'd say the hardest part of it all is coming up with a plan.
    coastin' along

  83. #83
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    New Seatbag!

    Well I am in the process of making new bags for 2014. Up first is my new seatbag. The new one loses .5oz and is right at 5oz. Went with heavier side material, lighter lower panel but 2 layers, no stiffener and removed the front velcro strap that went around seatpost collar.

    It works better without the stiffener and front strap. It is a little smaller in volume than the 2013 model but that is what I wanted. More tapered to allow full post drop. No attachment to post- rails only. No butting up to post and rubbing anymore either.

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-feb-2014-059.jpgMake Your Own Bikepacking gear-feb-2014-057.jpgMake Your Own Bikepacking gear-feb-2014-056.jpg
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  84. #84
    Dinner for wolves
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    Great bike, Rottendan.
    Responds to gravity

  85. #85
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    2014 full kit

    I made a new gas tank and framebag to finish this years kit. Going with the same front assembly I made in September- it works well and I dont need to make another one yet. Thanks to 12wheels for selling me an amazing sewing machine for a steal deal- a powerful machine makes all the difference.

    Going no backpack in the AZT750. I am going to have to be clever in my water carry. Got an invention I am working on for that. Will post pix when I am done.Name:  feb2013pix 043.JPG
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  86. #86
    gran jefe
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    nice work. looking forward to seeing how you will carry your water.

  87. #87
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    first frame bag. specialized camber

    first post to mtbr- planning on making my first frame bag for my new Specialized Camber. I have read and watched some videos, but am still a little unsure as I haven't used a sewing machine before. Here is a cardboard mock up of the bag and a list of materials I made for Rockywoods (was planning on making a second bag for my wife if this works out.) The dimensions of the bag are roughly 15X11X7 for the side panel and a width of 2-2.5 " Does this list look about right?

    The red line is for the zipper- 6.5" long, and the tape demarcates the velcro attachments. I might chop off an inch or so on the bottom to keep it away from the front der. and chainrings.

    Any advice would be much appreciated.
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  88. #88
    SpoK Werks Handmade Goods
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    Hi Toothjockey... that's a good start. A couple of thoughts. I would think about moving the bottom attachment either forward or backward to avoid trying to figure out where to mount it around the bottom bracket area. Also, if possible, I find it's better to stick with the same width velcro for simplicity and the look. Having said that, I would think about making the top front piece a bit wider to match the lower and center it on the zipper line. You'll find that when you have zippers in line with the velcro, it helps with opening/closing of the zipper. Speaking of the zipper, depending on which type you bought (hopeully, rolled-separable waterproof) you can run it full length as then the seams will help act as your zipper stops. I usually make a small zipper garage at either end out of spare material as well. When you're cutting, don't forget to add your seam allowance too. Lastly, depending on how deep the bag is, you might want to add side-to-side velcro as a divider/expansion controller. Hopefully, those comments help. The first one is always the toughest.

  89. #89
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    Simple, effective handlebar bag setup

    ...Or, should I call mine a candy-bar bag setup?

    First off, this thread is where I found the concept for what I did. They used PVC and someone else reused some handlebar grips.

    But, I've been thinking of a handlebar bag solution, came across that thread and wanted to try it out. Didn't have any 1" PVC pipe laying around to use and didn't want to waste time and gas to go to the hardware store.

    So, here is what you need:

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-hb1.jpg

    - Dry bag or stuff sack with or without daisy-chain webbing.

    - 1 set of 1" wide lashing straps (no reason you can't use 3/4" webbing, just need to find a rigid tubing that is also 3/4" wide).

    - Tube from m&ms minis candy (or some spare pieces of 1" PVC pipe, some old handlebar grips, etc...). Just want something of a somewhat rigid tubing that is right at a 1" inside diameter to match the width of the lashing straps.

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-hb2.jpg

    Cut the ends off of the candy tube and then cut the tube in half. This gives two 2 1/2" sections.

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-hb3.jpg

    Run the open end of the webbing thru the tube, over the handlebars and back thru the tube.

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-hb4.jpg

    If you're not using a daisy-chained bag, you can close off the loop for the webbing strap, otherwise, run the straps thru the daisy-chain and then complete the loop.

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-hb5.jpg

    Cinch everything down tight and either discard the extra length of strap webbing that is left or tie it off behind the fork and head tube to give extra assurance of no movement of the bag and mounts.


    Such a simple solution that I can't believe it took someone this long to figure out.

  90. #90
    I work in .001 tolerances
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    Introducing the HalfPipe top tube bag. This idea had been bouncing around in my head for awhile now.

    Was is worth it? Would standover be suitable?

    So far the answer is a big Yes. I've gotten a lot of positive response to this design.
    Nowadays with the ever popular dropped top tubes, there is a lot of real estate for people to use.

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-dsc05518.jpg

  91. #91
    SpoK Werks Handmade Goods
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    Nice name, interesting bag. For some people, that'd definitely be a great bag. I've had a couple of people ask about something similar but thus far, the standover height of their bikes has been too high for it to make sense.

  92. #92
    I work in .001 tolerances
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1 Speed View Post
    but thus far, the standover height of their bikes has been too high for it to make sense.
    For sure the biggest limiting factor. At 6'2" and ~34 inseam it works for me. Also the nature of the Fargo and bikepacking in general
    lends itself to a mellower riding style that a rapid dismount isn't usually required.

    I kept the side stiffeners out of the middle on both sides to allow some compression if needed.

  93. #93
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    Made my first harness for a guy to hold his sleeping padMake Your Own Bikepacking gear-harness.jpg

  94. #94
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    Just borrowed a sewing machine from a friend. I'm still getting the hang of it, but it is fun so far. I sewed up all the Velcro strips onto the long strip of fabric. Next step is to sew on the zipper to one of the side panels, and then sew the two panels onto the long strip. I'm hoping to have another friend that is handier with a sewing machine help me with those steps. Here are a couple of pics- I am pretty sure I screwed up and sewed all the velcro to the wrong side of the fabric, but I don't think it will make that much of a difference. It also looks like sewing it all together with the velcro on will be a pain.
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  95. #95
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    After having to start over and making many mistakes, I finally finished my first frame bag. I learned the hard way to avoid curves and use as few velcro straps as possible in order to simplify sewing (at least for my rudimentary skills). The bag is small because of the limiting frame design, but even if it doesn't pack much, it was fun to make.
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  96. #96
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    Finished this one today- I will probably try to glue in a piece of thin flexible plastic cutting mat that touches the stem. maybe add some to the frame bag if i can figure out a way that will hold the plastic well. Next gastank bag will probably have a sleeve(s) for some plastic reinforcement.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-screen-shot-2014-04-14-1.54.22-pm.jpg  

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-screen-shot-2014-04-14-1.54.35-pm.jpg  


  97. #97
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    Has anyone tried adding in support to bags after they are finished? I was thinking about supergluing some thin plastic panels to the inside of the fabric, maybe cover it over with some gorilla tape

  98. #98
    SpoK Werks Handmade Goods
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    Quote Originally Posted by toothjockey View Post
    Has anyone tried adding in support to bags after they are finished? I was thinking about supergluing some thin plastic panels to the inside of the fabric, maybe cover it over with some gorilla tape
    To tell you the truth... it might be easier to back up a bit, deconstruct and add it. Something to try might be to add vertical strips of fabric (folded over) on either end of the side panels to allow you to slip in/out the side support at will. I often tell people that one of the hardest parts of making bags is figuring out what needs to be there and in what order to construct things. However, sometimes, the best option is just to make a new one. You have to evaluate whether it'll take you more time and effort to deconstruct to reconstruct or just make new. Good luck.

  99. #99
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    Yeah, while finishing the top tube bag, i sort of knew I was shooting myself in the foot by not making sleeves. I would very much like to not take this one apart (the next one for my wife's bike will be done correctly from the start). I am thinking of using seam grip to glue the plastic to the nylon now, as it might be flexible enough to keep hold. If it works, I'll post an update

  100. #100
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    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear

    My first attempt at copying an Alpkit Koala seat pack. It could be better bit only a ride will tell. Thursday I am taking a 2 day. I am excited.




    Sent from my hammock
    "Your opinion may vary, but it's stupid." -Rich Dillen

  101. #101
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    New Tour Divide Gas Tank!

    Superlight. Mad volume. No sway. Narrow for long out of saddle efforts.
    Just need the new bike to put it on!Name:  may2014.1 007.JPG
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  102. #102
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    Cuben Fiber Full Kit

    A cuben fiber kit I made earlier this year in prep for Summer bike packing fun.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-cuben-bar-tube-flat.jpg  

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  103. #103
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    Name:  PannierCraft4 2014-06-13.jpg
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Size:  113.5 KBMine is "old school". We used to bicycle camp and are working toward getting back into it. It has been a few years (like 16). In the past I made all our gear. I can't even remember all the sets of Saddle Bags and Handle Bar Bags I have made, over the years, for bicycles between my own and my kids. I have the information of how I make these and the Hard Panniers too, on Does My Butt Look Big In The Saddle - Front Page and or Far Out Living - Front Page

    The difference between a set of Panniers and a Saddlebag is the fabric that holds the two Panniers together on the Saddlebag.

  104. #104
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    made harness prototype

  105. #105
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    i had an idea for a front bag setup with a rigid holder.

    first prototype seem good. need some finishingMake Your Own Bikepacking gear-img_20141105_202337.jpgMake Your Own Bikepacking gear-img_20141105_202201.jpgMake Your Own Bikepacking gear-img_20141105_201843.jpgMake Your Own Bikepacking gear-img_20141105_201854.jpg
    expensive cars are a waste of money. Expensive bikes...not so much!

  106. #106
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    You all really "do nice work". I enjoy seeing your gear and what you have designed.

    I have my patterns cut our for my Handle Bar Sling and the bag for within. I will need my husband to help me draw out, trace, my Frame Bag.

    I also made a Bright Yellow Polar Fleece Scarf to size with velcro closure. That way, while riding, it does not have long ends to get caught in things so that you might get choked or pulled off the bike. I used to make these for horse back riding for myself and others. I made a matching Balaclava and an Ear Band. Yesterday I bought Neon Green Fleece to make more....to match the color of my new Gravity Bullseye Monster Fatty. Ha3

  107. #107
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    My rigid farme setup did not work as i wanted so i build a harness today.
    Its got fiberglass strips to make it more stable.

    I also made a bladder pocket out of a old wetsuit to prevent my water to freeze
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-img_20141116_161509.jpg  

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    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-img_20141116_144940.jpg  

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    expensive cars are a waste of money. Expensive bikes...not so much!

  108. #108
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    polyester thread info

    I am hoping you guys can shed some light on thread for me. I have read that all polyester is crucial for outdoor gear. I bought some at Joann Fabrics- Coats & Clarks OUTDOOR 100% polyester.
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    I am trying to get the kenmore 158 i bought off of CL to work (missing a thread guide) and the repairman is telling me not to bother if I'm going to keep using this thread. Is there all polyester thread that is more friendly with a home machine? I am getting very frustrated with the whole thing. I can't find out any information about this thread, but it looks like there are different gauges of polyester thread? What are you guys using? I would love to make a tool roll for saddle, handlebar harness, tarp, etc.

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  110. #110
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    If your machine won't handle that poly thread, you need a more powerful machine.
    I had the same issue. A bag maker clued me in on which old machines workwell. Older is better in home machines- small non-commercial machines of today have plastic parts and weak motors. One of the old strong machines is the singer 15 series and it's many clones. I ended up with a Japanese clone that puts that exact thread thru 6 layers of vx21. All day. My singer from the 70's is nice for zigzag and such but can't handle poly thread at all. Plastic garbage really.
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  111. #111
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    I'm with dream4est.... I do my bags on a 60+ year old German machine. Of course, it's an industral saddle making machine with a motor about the size of an old Beetle motor. Look on Ebay or find a good industrial machine vendor. They often carry used machines and they're usually a lot less expensive than new as well as being of higher quality, in many cases.

  112. #112
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    I would agree, but, if you want to work on some lighter weight gear in the interim, Gutterman thread is lighter than the Coats & Clark that I have (I think this is the same thread you are trying to work with) and very good quality. That said, if your machine can't work with the Coats and Clark thread, webbing will be a non-starter regardless of the thread. But you should be able to sew something like a silnylon tarp and maybe a frame bag, depending on how you do attachment for the latter.

  113. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikepackingdude View Post
    Anybody ever make a sleeping bag?
    Old post, I know, but I did make sleeping bags a few years back.

    My Homemade Hiking Quilts | The GPS Geek

    Right now, I'm working on a couple pairs of insulated pogies and afterwards I plan to do a seat bag.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/diy...ns-942156.html

  114. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by Addy Marx View Post
    A cuben fiber kit I made earlier this year in prep for Summer bike packing fun.
    Hola Addy Marx,

    where do you buy the cuben fiber?

    Saludos,
    Federico
    Cycling in developing countries, making & printing portraits for those families who've NONE. www.theironlyportrait.com

  115. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by toothjockey View Post
    I am hoping you guys can shed some light on thread for me. I have read that all polyester is crucial for outdoor gear. I bought some at Joann Fabrics- Coats & Clarks OUTDOOR 100% polyester.
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    I am trying to get the kenmore 158 i bought off of CL to work (missing a thread guide) and the repairman is telling me not to bother if I'm going to keep using this thread. Is there all polyester thread that is more friendly with a home machine? I am getting very frustrated with the whole thing. I can't find out any information about this thread, but it looks like there are different gauges of polyester thread? What are you guys using? I would love to make a tool roll for saddle, handlebar harness, tarp, etc.
    When I had this problem, they gave me some thinner nylon thread to use. After they laughed at me for not listening the first time.

  116. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheirOnlyPortrait View Post
    Hola Addy Marx,

    where do you buy the cuben fiber?

    Saludos,
    Federico
    Hi Federico.... I buy mine here. You might consider the Hybrid version as it helps a lot against abrasion problems which Cuben is prone to ZPacks.com Ultralight Backpacking Gear - Materials
    Last edited by 1 Speed; 02-03-2015 at 01:08 AM.

  117. #117
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    I use a Singer 5525 from the early 80's.

    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/16398091585" title="DIY Pogies by Nate, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7365/16398091585_92aef73644_z.jpg" width="640" height="427" alt="DIY Pogies"></a>

    Yesterday I was sewing 1000D Cordura with this thread

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-umx-s950-8150-o_tcm72-78295.jpg

    With a heavy needle, I was sewing bar tacks through 8 layers of fabric. It was on the edge of the machine's capability, but possible.

    I use this stuff for lighter work with a finer needle. No problem whatsoever.

    https://www.guetermann.com/shop/en/v...&type=consumer

  118. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by toothjockey View Post
    I am hoping you guys can shed some light on thread for me. I have read that all polyester is crucial for outdoor gear. I bought some at Joann Fabrics- Coats & Clarks OUTDOOR 100% polyester.
    Name:  31MCEzPLIYL.jpg
Views: 8784
Size:  9.6 KB
    I am trying to get the kenmore 158 i bought off of CL to work (missing a thread guide) and the repairman is telling me not to bother if I'm going to keep using this thread. Is there all polyester thread that is more friendly with a home machine? I am getting very frustrated with the whole thing. I can't find out any information about this thread, but it looks like there are different gauges of polyester thread? What are you guys using? I would love to make a tool roll for saddle, handlebar harness, tarp, etc.
    I ended up using this same thread. It was the only thread I found that wouldn't break before the fabric ripped out. I had trouble at first with it jamming or fraying. First you need to adjust your lower bobbin tension so that is slides out properly (for set up see: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TaH9yB7XUBk) Second make sure your needle is big enough and has a large eye for the thread. I was using a Schmetz 100/16 needle and could go through 3 layers of heavy fabric and nylon webbing, be it at the capacity of the machine. Hope this helps.

  119. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheirOnlyPortrait View Post
    Hola Addy Marx,

    where do you buy the cuben fiber?

    Saludos,
    Federico
    Hola Federico,
    The best source is Zpacks. ZPacks.com Ultralight Backpacking Gear - Shelter
    They're the best!

  120. #120
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    Hi Guys,
    I was hoping for some help selecting a machine. I found an old used Sears Kenmore at a sewing machine shop. It looks like it is from the 80's and is beefy looking. I let the owner of the shop know what I would be doing with it and he said that will be fine. Is there anything I should be looking for to make sure it can handle the heavy duty work.
    Thanks for the help.

    Michael

  121. #121
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    Have you seen the recent lively thread below about sewing machines?

  122. #122
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    I will say it again. <smiles>

    I make Harnesses for a living. Marna&#39;s Menagerie - Front Page and Marna&#39;s Menagerie - Front Page IT IS NOT THE SEWING MACHINE it is the needles and threads used. And you need to go back over your seams at least three times to make them very strong, strong enough to hold all your items with the bag getting rough use on the trail.

  123. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by dream4est View Post
    superlight. Mad volume. No sway. Narrow for long out of saddle efforts.
    Just need the new bike to put it on!Name:  may2014.1 007.JPG
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    that looks very nice!

  124. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marna_Kazmaier View Post
    that looks very nice!
    Thanks. I have been going without that bag lately I think I am about to add it back in and ditch the backpack for race season.Name:  jan2015bike 049.1.jpg
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  125. #125
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    Where'd everyone learn to sew/where on the Internet can I learn to sew/are there any particularly good books on sewing?

  126. #126
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    Google, YouTube, scrap fabric and a sewing machine are all ya need. If you enjoy the learning part of it you'll figure it all out. I'm on the journey myself.

  127. #127
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    I am hoping you guys can help diagnose a sewing issue. I was stitching some practice lines, (just bought some new thread and needles) and it looks like the machine is skipping stitches. I messed around with the thread tension, and can't really tell if it made a difference. it seems that it skipped more when the setting was for longer stitches (not sure what the correct term is). Here are a couple of picks. Its hard to see in the background of the pics, but one of the lines was of much smaller/short stitches and looks better...ATTACH=CONFIG]965985[/ATTACH]Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-p1010035.jpg
    I think the bobbin tension is ok, but am not sure... I am a complete novice so any info would be much appreciated
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-p1010033.jpg  


  128. #128
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    Wow... for me, that's a tough one to diagnose. It could be not enough bobbin tension or thread tension as well. Try rethreading the machine. That works for me when mine kind of wigs out. Check to make sure that your needle is in correctly as well. Other than that, I'm kind of out of ideas provided it's not a machine problem.

  129. #129
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    Hi,
    I'm new to this pack making lark, but I'm an old hand at sewing and machines...
    To set up a nice balanced stitch, where the the threads interlock between plys of fabric use difference coloured (UK spelling) thread.
    In my experience, the cause of skip stitching can be varied.
    Here are a few problem solving tips.
    1, if it was sewing ok and suddenly it is not, check that it's threaded correctly.
    2, Check needle. when sewing thicker fabrics, the needle and be easily deflected and hit the throat plate. This can bur the needle point or even bend it.
    3, If you have just changed a needle, check that it is pushed all the way up in the needle bar.
    4, Remove the bobbin and check the for snagging in the under thread.
    5, Remove throat plate clean any build up of fibers.
    6, It could be that the hook point is too far away from the needle scarf. With home machines this is the way they are setup. The manufactures don't expect them to be used with heavy weight materials. A thicker needle may get you by.
    Beyond this, it's having some who knows a thing or two about machines to lok at it. Or there may be a youtube video instruction on how to set up a machine.

    Good luck

  130. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1 Speed View Post
    Hi Federico.... I buy mine here. You might consider the Hybrid version as it helps a lot against abrasion problems which Cuben is prone to ZPacks.com Ultralight Backpacking Gear - Materials
    Thanks for the tip 1 Speed!

    Saludos,
    Federico
    Cycling in developing countries, making & printing portraits for those families who've NONE. www.theironlyportrait.com

  131. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by Addy Marx View Post
    Hola Federico,
    The best source is Zpacks. ZPacks.com Ultralight Backpacking Gear - Shelter
    They're the best!
    Hola Andy,

    Sorry for the late response... I'm trying to get a decent bag with Cordura (much cheaper for practice) and will be ordering some cuben fiber at Zpacks as soon as I'm able to build something decent

    Saludos,
    Federico
    Cycling in developing countries, making & printing portraits for those families who've NONE. www.theironlyportrait.com

  132. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by toothjockey View Post
    I am hoping you guys can help diagnose a sewing issue. I was stitching some practice lines, (just bought some new thread and needles) and it looks like the machine is skipping stitches. I messed around with the thread tension, and can't really tell if it made a difference. it seems that it skipped more when the setting was for longer stitches (not sure what the correct term is). Here are a couple of picks. Its hard to see in the background of the pics, but one of the lines was of much smaller/short stitches and looks better...ATTACH=CONFIG]965985[/ATTACH]Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1010035.jpg 
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    I think the bobbin tension is ok, but am not sure... I am a complete novice so any info would be much appreciated
    i had this problem in my beginners sewing days when i inserted needle backwards.

  133. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikepackingdude View Post
    Just finished my first frame pack and it is harder than it looks and I learned a lot, made a few mistakes but hey thats part of learning.
    Hola bikepackingdude!

    I'll try to build my first frame bag this weekend... hopefully I'll have something to share on Monday

    Have a great weekend!

    Saludos,
    Federico
    Cycling in developing countries, making & printing portraits for those families who've NONE. www.theironlyportrait.com

  134. #134
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    what do you guys use to seal the seams? tape or the liquid stuff?
    I'm never gonna be a Rock Star

  135. #135
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    I've used the sealing tape before but the liquid I've only used on my tent.

  136. #136
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    Does anyone know of fabric that will not frey? Fleece is not what i need and hypalon is too expensive. Also would be nice if it came in couple colors

  137. #137
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    I'm hoping to turn this into a 3 compartment full frame pack flared at the front for bike packing with a Krampus.

    1050 d Ballistic for frame tube panels, dividers, and reinforcements
    210 d Dyneema X gridstop for the main panels
    1.9 oz/yd PU coated ripstop for internal panel
    mesh for small inner pocket

    The plan is pretty simple: a top pocket for holding a 3L bladder with hose port, a lower pocket for additional storage (clothes & tool probably), and a flat panel on the opposite side with a mesh pocket up top for holding snacks. Debating on adding a port on the flat pocket side for USB cables.

  138. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheirOnlyPortrait View Post
    Hola bikepackingdude!

    I'll try to build my first frame bag this weekend... hopefully I'll have something to share on Monday

    Have a great weekend!

    Saludos,
    Federico
    Hola!

    Sorry for the late response, I'd been bikepacking Northern Argentina for my 1st warm up trip

    My bags don't look great up close, but they did a great job during my trip!

    Saludos,
    Federico
    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-dscf4003.jpg
    Cycling in developing countries, making & printing portraits for those families who've NONE. www.theironlyportrait.com

  139. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheirOnlyPortrait View Post
    Hola!

    Sorry for the late response, I'd been bikepacking Northern Argentina for my 1st warm up trip

    My bags don't look great up close, but they did a great job during my trip!

    Saludos,
    Federico
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-dscf4002.jpg
    Cycling in developing countries, making & printing portraits for those families who've NONE. www.theironlyportrait.com

  140. #140
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    sewing stuff with an eager 4yo on your lap is quite a challenge...
    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-d8178e983205e42f9b741b002110fc8ff101e765.jpg

  141. #141
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    we feed our dogs beneful dog food from a 40lb bag. the plastic the bag is made if is some pretty nice stuff. i've made some tote bags and a wallet with it. i'm not sure of the durability of it but it might be good to use for a mock up. the bags are taped together so when i pulled it all apart it makes a sheet about 36"X39".
    I'm never gonna be a Rock Star

  142. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by drøn View Post
    sewing stuff with an eager 4yo on your lap is quite a challenge...
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	d8178e983205e42f9b741b002110fc8ff101e765.jpg 
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    Very Cute!

  143. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by Megashnauzer View Post
    we feed our dogs beneful dog food from a 40lb bag. the plastic the bag is made if is some pretty nice stuff. i've made some tote bags and a wallet with it. i'm not sure of the durability of it but it might be good to use for a mock up. the bags are taped together so when i pulled it all apart it makes a sheet about 36"X39".
    YOU ARE SO RIGHT! Feed Bags are WONDERFUL for so many things...here are a few I use them for,
    Far Out Living - 101 Uses For Empty Feed Bags

    On another one of our website I have how to make a Bag For Hanging Human Food while camping and Bickpacking. I have photos there. Does My Butt Look Big In The Saddle - Trail Spinning

  144. #144
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    Here are some recent pix of bags I am rocking for the Tour Divide 2015 coming up in 2 weeks.Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-may2015bike-207.jpgMake Your Own Bikepacking gear-may2015bike-210.jpgAttachment 992118Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-may2015bike.2-003.jpg
    Divide Bike Bags

  145. #145
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    Looks great, Mark!

    How are you attaching the little bag on the downtube?

  146. #146
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    Hi Toby!
    That white bag has one gas tank style webbing/velcro/d ring deal. Its hard to see as its black and butted up to the downtube. I also use a reusable zip tie to pull it in at the top where the bag folds down and buckles. Its attached to the small zip tie for the rear brake guide. That keeps it from rubbing front tire at full compress. I love the reusable zips- i got em for a gps mount, spot mount and a phone mount inside the gas tank. I can be in and out of that downtube bag real quick.
    Divide Bike Bags

  147. #147
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    Cool, thanks Mark. I'm going to check into reusable zips!

    Good luck out there this summer. I always enjoy watching your Spot. Back-to-back Triple Crowns would be simply be unbelievably cool!

  148. #148
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    Very Nice Dreams4est. I like the way you have used areas that might have been overlooked. <smiles> Nice work on the bags too. I am looking forward to hearing about your trip and how the equipment all worked out for you. Thanks for sharing all the photos.

  149. #149
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    I just realized I never posted my bag.

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-rawfabric.jpg
    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-bagparts.jpg

    I used 210D Dyneema X Gridstop for the main panels since both of my packs with 1000+ miles on them look near flawless. 1050 D ballistic nylon for the edges facing tubes because I had no idea how heavy it was, next time it'll be lighter. The inner panel for the map pocket is polyurethane coated ripstop nylon.

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-bagcollage.jpg

    On the right it has a top pocket with room and ports for my 3L water bladder/inline filter and battery packs, with a lower compartment for flat kit/tools. The left side has a full length map pocket with a mesh pouch at the top for snacks.

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-11750641_902709743128538_5607829319950163583_n.jpg

    Thanks to everyone in this thread for the help!

  150. #150
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    Finally done with my mid. The color is little too much but otherwise i am pretty happyMake Your Own Bikepacking gear-img_0098.jpg

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-img_0100.jpg

  151. #151
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    Woah, nice! Can you post some more infos like dimensions, weight etc. ?
    n+1

  152. #152
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    i'll get exact dimensions and weight later. it is not completely done as i need to add intermediate tie outs on the ridges, few other convenience details inside and seam seal the whole thing. it fits 2 people, i am 6'2" an have plenty of room in 1/2 of the space. packs tiny, i like that a lot.

  153. #153
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    My new DIY roll top framebag.



  154. #154
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    Nicely done! I haven't made an attempt at a roll-top frame bag yet... in part because I've yet to understand the perceived benefit. What do you like better about it? FYI - That's not criticism, I'm actually curious... even as a bag maker. I've honestly never had issues with zippers, maybe that's why I'm perplexed.

  155. #155
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    ^I did not have zippers in stock so I decided to try the roll top.
    I have not had problems with zippers, but this seemed like a good solution.
    Zipperless Frame Bag Review - BIKEPACKING.com

  156. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by cuppis View Post
    ^I did not have zippers in stock so I decided to try the roll top.
    I have not had problems with zippers, but this seemed like a good solution.
    Zipperless Frame Bag Review - BIKEPACKING.com
    What do they say... Necessity is the mother of invention? Again, nicely done. It'd be great if you'd give an update after you've used them.

  157. #157
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    A bit off topic- I accidentally burned some holes in my patagonia R1 fleece. The holes are around 1 inch in diameter and there are 3 close together, and a fourth one a few inches below. Looking for recommendations for repairing it. I have tenacious tape that I could patch it with, inside and outside or should I find some fleece and so patches? Both?

  158. #158
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    I'd say, especially since it's a Patagucci jacket... check here Repair Your Gear - Patagonia® Repair & Product Care Guides

  159. #159
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    Just did my first bags, a framebag for my Straggler and a small handlebar pouch for snacks, camera etc. Handlebar bag design is based on the one made by Yanco.
    Apart from wishing for a stronger sewing machine it went off surprisingly smooth!


    Straggler


    Handlebar bag
    n+1

  160. #160
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    Hi my home made bikepacking gear

    Hi
    Bottle holder from 4inch plastic pipe
    Frame bags with my wife sewing help
    Bottle holder (82 gram) are fit up to 2 liter water bottle or small bag
    2 holder on the front fork +1 under the frame
    Bike are Kona Hei Hei trial DL 2016
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-photo_20160313_060005.jpg  

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-photo_20160319_171353.jpg  

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-img-20160315-wa0000.jpg  


  161. #161
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    Bottle holder on the front fork

    Cut from 4inch pipe + 2 strap
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-img-20160321-wa0002.jpg  


  162. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yuval11 View Post
    Hi
    Bottle holder from 4inch plastic pipe
    Frame bags with my wife sewing help
    Bottle holder (82 gram) are fit up to 2 liter water bottle or small bag
    2 holder on the front fork +1 under the frame
    Bike are Kona Hei Hei trial DL 2016
    As a fan of color... I love the material pattern! Is is picnic table fabric or printed Cordura? Also, I'm just curious as to why you have the zipper on the main bag parallel with the downtube? Personally (granted, it's not my bag), I would worry about things falling out when I opened it. If it's for water, then it makes a lot of sense. Interesting top tube/seat tube bag. Those longer ones are becoming more popular. I get more and more requests for those.

  163. #163
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    Hi
    Fabric are printed Cordura.
    Zippers are for the bottle holder only, nor for the bag.
    Bottle holder are also connect to the frame tube with a lot fo stiky plastic tape.

  164. #164
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    Fast open\close Adjastable strached strap
    Low coast easy to make
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-photo_20160322_213621.jpg  


  165. #165
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    *DISCLAIMER* - These are not mine. I found them on the googlez. If the owner doesn't want the pics here I will gladly take them down. I thought they were to cool not to share. Please check out his website. There are a few more pictures and his commentary along with them. Worth the read for sure.

    The handlebar bag is made out of a roadkill raccoon and the frame bag is made out of bark tanned deer hide. Awesome.


  166. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by brankulo View Post
    Finally done with my mid. The color is little too much but otherwise i am pretty happyClick image for larger version. 

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    WOW! I LOVE THE COLOR.....and Man! Nice Job!
    Get Healthy! Ride A Bicycle
    www.doesmybuttlookbiginthesaddle.com

  167. #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by cuppis View Post
    My new DIY roll top framebag.


    That looks very nice! My problem with it is that I would try to add too much stuff in it...and it would not close! <winks>
    Get Healthy! Ride A Bicycle
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  168. #168
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    Just got a Marin Pine Mountain 1. I needed a new bag to fit the new triangle size. It has mounting tabs on the top tube, so I decided to try out a internal frame and ditch the velcro straps. First I fabbed up some 1/16"x1" aluminum flat bar.

    Then grandma and I made the bag with sleeves to insert the bars. Mounted up perfectly and I'm loving the look.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-imag02174.jpg  

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-v__8580.jpg  

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-v__2a12.jpg  

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-imag02180.jpg  

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-imag02179.jpg  


  169. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikepackingdude View Post
    Thank you 1 Speed. I did use some soft shell material for the flat parts that hit the frame and on the bottom of the hook and loop (velcro) and the main body of the pack I used 1000d Cordura.
    Good pack and a cute dog...
    :) Limeng

  170. #170
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    Any chance someone could point be to a source for foam and plastic bag stiffening type materials? All I can come up with is industrial sources for huge quantities.

  171. #171
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    Home depot for foam, target, walmart or such for hdpe mats

  172. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by brankulo View Post
    Home depot for foam, target, walmart or such for hdpe mats
    Hmm...I walked all over both of those places and the local hardware store and found nothing.

    What product at Walmart consists of a hdpe mat? A cutting mat?

    All they had at Home depot was rigid insulation foam.

  173. #173
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    Its a roll of foam, pink, it is normally used under sill plates in construction. Hdpe can be found in kitchen department in form of rectaangular mats that you would put on dining table

    Owens Corning Foam SealR Sill Plate Gasket 5-1/2 in. x 50 ft.-2FS - The Home Depot

  174. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by brankulo View Post
    Its a roll of foam, pink, it is normally used under sill plates in construction. Hdpe can be found in kitchen department in form of rectaangular mats that you would put on dining table

    Owens Corning Foam SealR Sill Plate Gasket 5-1/2 in. x 50 ft.-2FS - The Home Depot
    Thanks for the link. I don't think it's quite what I'm after. I'm looking for about 3ft x 1ft of closed cell insulation about 1/2" thick and as dense as possible while still coming off a roll and flexible-ish.

    I'll have to look again for place mats made of hdpe. Also thought about looking at yoga mats for the foam. The back panel of a hydration pack is about the exact type of foam I'm trying to find, I'm about ready to cut up an old one.

    Would prefer to find an actual source for this type of stuff so I can repeat the process without hunting Walmart for supplies.

  175. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by wesMAmyke View Post
    Thanks for the link. I don't think it's quite what I'm after. I'm looking for about 3ft x 1ft of closed cell insulation about 1/2" thick and as dense as possible while still coming off a roll and flexible-ish.
    .
    Would a blue sleeping mat work for you? Their made up of closed cell foam and you could get a 1/2" thick one and cut it to the size you wanted. I don't know if it'll be ridged enough but it could probably work... It'd be better than a yoga mat.


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  176. #176
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    Quote Originally Posted by campergf23 View Post
    Would a blue sleeping mat work for you? Their made up of closed cell foam and you could get a 1/2" thick one and cut it to the size you wanted. I don't know if it'll be ridged enough but it could probably work... It'd be better than a yoga mat.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I had just thought of the camping mat idea after posting about the yoga mat. I'm less concerned with rigidity and more looking for something dense enough as it's actually going to function as padding and not just stiffening material.

    I'll have to make another trip to look at things to cut up and reuse. So far have only found one place that sells what might be the type of foam I'm looking for in a reasonable quantity so I don't end up with 100ft of something I can't use.

    Will have to look out for things made of hdpe plastic as well, no luck with a source for that either.

  177. #177
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    Frame pack for under $15?

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-image.jpgMake Your Own Bikepacking gear-image.jpgMake Your Own Bikepacking gear-image.jpg

    I made my own frame pack for about $15 to get me started, out of a drain pipe extender I had in my garage. I wanted to:

    A. Make sure I enjoyed bike packing before splashing out on more expensive gear, and
    B. Get out on the trails fast.

    I was pleasantly surprised with the results. The gear I built has stood up well for over 400km and being built of flexible plastic is lightweight, not susceptible to staining or tearing, and can be left on the bike when it's on a car rack by simply bending it out of the way. The top half of the drain pipe fits over the top tube and clips into the bottom part using standard MEC webbing and clips attached with zip ties. It is not as pretty as a Revelate bag but as a bike packing experiment: it works.

    The trips I did with this setup this summer have whet my appetite for more riding, but I am in no rush to replace it with a proper bag just yet. It has proven rugged and useful, negating the need for a backpack on day rides as well. Access is excellent, unlike the one-zipper frame bag that swallows up smaller items into the depths, never to be seen again.

    I leave it on the bike pretty much full time, but removing is as simple as undoing the straps and unscrewing the water bottle screws that secure it to the frame.

    You can see more pics at:

    https://rideandthrive.wordpress.com/...packing-setup/

  178. #178
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    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear

    Finally got around to sewing up a frame bag. Nothing fancy, single pocket with a single zipper, Velcro straps, and a rain flap over the zipper.








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  179. #179
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    I'm thinking of trying my hand at some pogies/bar mitts. It true DIY fashion (and because I'm on a budget) I'm looking to reuse existing material. I remembered an old wetsuit was sitting in the basement and was wondering if that would be a good option for the job, or at least as an outer material with the option of adding a layer of insulated material inside if it needed to be warmer.

    Thoughts?

  180. #180
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    ^neoprene (wetsuit material) is often used to make pogies for water sports like kayaking due to it's ability to keep it's insulation value when wet. It should work fairly well for mtb pogies. I don't know how hard it would be to work with.


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  181. #181
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    Tool Roll

    I made a rollup tool bag. It's designed to carry everything needed while bike packing. My tires are setup tubeless but I like to carry 2 tubes & a pump just incase.

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-fullsizerender-2.jpgMake Your Own Bikepacking gear-fullsizerender.jpgMake Your Own Bikepacking gear-img_0924.jpg

  182. #182
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    Quote Originally Posted by misternicholas View Post
    I made a rollup tool bag. It's designed to carry everything needed while bike packing. My tires are setup tubeless but I like to carry 2 tubes & a pump just incase.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Really nicely done. The attached light is a great touch for night time repairs. ....And yes, two tubes is a good idea, especially for when you're a long way away from shops. I really like the orange Cordura-like fabric. Do you know what it is?

  183. #183
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    Thanks! The material I bought from ripstopbytheroll:
    https://ripstopbytheroll.com/product...nt=18632565057

    The bag fits on the back of my seat so it's mostly used as a rear light. It is one of those fancy rear/front lights so I could use it for repairs too. Hopefully I'm not doing too many night time repairs!

    Frame bags coming soon for an AWOL & Fargo. Waiting on fabric.

  184. #184
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    That's a nice little bag, but it may benefit from having an extended flap on one side, a small strip of velcro may be nice but not necessary as the straps extend around the bag. I would buy that.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  185. #185
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    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear

    Quote Originally Posted by dbhammercycle View Post
    That's a nice little bag, but it may benefit from having an extended flap on one side, a small strip of velcro may be nice but not necessary as the straps extend around the bag. I would buy that.
    Are you talking about a flap to keep the tools from falling out? It has one of those. My first version did not & tools fell out easily. I have about 150 miles with it under my seat & no problems.

    I try to not sure a lot of Velcro because it generally fails easily.

    Here are some better pics:



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  186. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by wesMAmyke View Post
    Hmm...I walked all over both of those places and the local hardware store and found nothing.

    What product at Walmart consists of a hdpe mat? A cutting mat?

    All they had at Home depot was rigid insulation foam.


    For a light weight stiffener, try the cheap roll-up cutting boards made for backpacking from any dollar store (cheap) or fancy backpacking outfit (more expensive, same thing). Work great for making bikepacking gear

  187. #187
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    Did some initial testing and decided to make some cuts into the wetsuit so now I'm committed. It was far to small anyways so no risk if I screw it up. It turns out that the arm hole is a nice fit over the handle bar, tight but not to tight to get over the shifter. The leg hole also seems about perfect for my arm, it would be snug with a thick coat but should be perfect, just slightly loose at mid forearm, when I'm wearing normal cold layers. The arm didn't have a whole lot of area to work with so i may need to add some fabric to connect the two, but it looks like it could very well work out.

    A couple pics of it very roughly pinned together after first rough cuts.




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  188. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by cuppis View Post
    My new DIY roll top framebag.


    What material did you use?
    Veni Vidi Biki

    I came, I saw, I biked.

  189. #189
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    Is this a dumb idea? Use/modify an molle small dog harness to serve as a seat post cradle for a 15L dry bag in the back?

    Veni Vidi Biki

    I came, I saw, I biked.

  190. #190
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    Quote Originally Posted by skankingbiker View Post
    Is this a dumb idea? Use/modify an molle small dog harness to serve as a seat post cradle for a 15L dry bag in the back?

    Just a quick look at this pic and I'd say that it's probably quite a reasonable idea.

  191. #191
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    Seatbag Harness

    I recently picked up a sewing hobby. When I heard my buddies were interested in dabbling in bike packing, I decided to try making my own gear.

    I started with a seatbag harness. Essentially, it's a harness designed to accept any sort of drybag/stuff sack. Really happy with how it turned out!

    Cost of materials were maybe $15 - $20.

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-fullsizerender1.jpg
    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-fullsizerender2.jpg
    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-fullsizerender3.jpg
    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-fullsizerender4.jpg

  192. #192
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    Does anyone have a pattern/template for a saddle bag (or dry bag holster)? I'm going back and forth on some different ideas and would love to be able to knock one out that's proven so that i can react and make adjustments.

  193. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyle_vk View Post
    Does anyone have a pattern/template for a saddle bag (or dry bag holster)? I'm going back and forth on some different ideas and would love to be able to knock one out that's proven so that i can react and make adjustments.
    yup i would like to know as well something like the terrapin but able to hold a regular 5L drybag

  194. #194
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    First version of my framebag, made using water resistant canvas, 2nd version will use x-pac. Holds 3L of water, snacks, phone, keys, etc... allows me to go for longer rides without needing a backpack or hip pack. This frame only fits a 20oz water bottle in a cage, so 3L is a big upgrade. Will use the id badge reel trick to mount the bite valve once one arrives in the mail. The ROK straps used to secure the bladder to the downtube and keep it from bulging into the crank arms work excellent.

    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-20170513_162346_1.jpgMake Your Own Bikepacking gear-20170513_162340_1.jpgMake Your Own Bikepacking gear-20170513_142055_1.jpg

  195. #195
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    Here are some pics of a few new bags I have made in the past few months:

    Imgur: The most awesome images on the Internet

  196. #196
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    @ShredAZ - I made one VERY similar to that. I made it initially as a test run and would build up something nicer/stronger when it failed. 2 years later it's holding strong. I like it because I can run a smaller bag on the mtb and then use the same harness with larger bag on the road bike. Having the extra feet of cord has come in handy as well.

  197. #197
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    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-20170530_230258.jpg

    DH bike version, made from x Pac, weight about .25 lbs and fits a hydrapak and snacks. It made porcupine rim a lot more fun last weekend not having to bring a backpack.

  198. #198
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    Make Your Own Bikepacking gear-20170606_154609.jpgMake Your Own Bikepacking gear-20170606_150453.jpgMake Your Own Bikepacking gear-20170606_150424.jpg

    Getting better at it, made this one for a darkside to carry tools and stuff, xpac is super light, only weighs 60g.

  199. #199
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    For those that have made feedbags, do you use any sort of stiffener to maintain the shape? i've got some left over x-pac type material from a frame bag project and some 1.9oz ripstop as well, so i'm planning on having a go at a feedbag over the next couple weeks.

  200. #200
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyle_vk View Post
    For those that have made feedbags, do you use any sort of stiffener to maintain the shape? i've got some left over x-pac type material from a frame bag project and some 1.9oz ripstop as well, so i'm planning on having a go at a feedbag over the next couple weeks.
    I don't, for the most part. On the Cookie Jar that I make, the liner is basically a coozie, for lack of a better term. It's also removable. The foam inside the layers of cordura lining, helps to add rigidity. That, along with the heavy Cordura that I use on the outside of the bag and the vertical ribs (from the four panels) on the bag, gives it a pretty fair bit of stiffness.

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