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  1. #1
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    components for rough touring with LHT

    OK, Ive gotten good advise so far.
    Im building a Surly LHT with S&S couplers for a trip in Asia.
    Any ideas on simple, robust components.

    Rear Deraileur: Suggested was a Shimano M772 SGS. This looks good, reasonable price. I will maybe use it with 36T on the cassette(?) I have a 36T cassette and I read it works fine on a 26' wheel. Other suggestions?

    BB: Shimano 24mm hollowtech was suggested as opposed to a square tapered UN55. This is a 68 width bike. Any other suggestions?

    Brakes RIM V brakes: One suggestion was XTR V Brakes. These with a set of grips will cost well over $100. That is ok, but are they worth that extra price? Are they worth that extra price when I an coasting down the Himalayan Mountains fully loaded, is what I am asking. Will a lower cost set of V brakes do just as well? I can afford the XTR, so there is no reason to buy lower quality first, and then upgrade later. This is my first long distance tour, and if my gear sucks Ill get a bad impression.

    Shifters: All my bikes have SRAM attack grip shifters. They seem fine, and I like the low profile that never catch on stuff. But Paul Thumbies were suggested with bar end shifters. Comments?

    Might indulge myself in a Tubus Cargo. They look good.

    Other than that, I have a new set of Rhyno lites with shimano 525 hubs. I had these drilled for Schraeder and have Schwalbe mondial Touring plus, I have a Brooks b67 with springs, mens, it is wide and fits my butt, I like trek bars, and I have those. I have a JANDD extreme for the front.
    Anything to add? I hopefully take this to Asia in October. It is getting complete. I want to tinker with it all summer, and start commuting to work so I know how it feels. Been to Asia more than 20 winters, just never on a bike.
    Actually just clicked the button on a tubus rack.

  2. #2
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    I just bought a 525, they get good reviews for being rock solid. I think most of your gear is good. If you like grip shift go with that but I don't like it. I like simple thumb shifters.

    My major concern is using XTR V brakes. Do they even make those anymore? XTR is not made to be tough, it is made to be light. I went down that hill of the pass north of Manali and burned through a whole set of V brake pads, they will not last you in the Himalayas loaded down. I would get disc brakes with 180mm or even 200mm front rotors and bring lots of extra pads. Go with Avid BB7's set them up right and Speed Dial 7 levers, you can get them cheap on Jenson USA.
    All I am saying is give pizza chants

  3. #3
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    Hi alaskadude. You've definitely done your homework. I think your bike's build is excellent; I'm really digging the rugged simplicity of it. The only constructive criticism I'll toss your way is below:

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskadude View Post
    BB: Shimano 24mm hollowtech was suggested as opposed to a square tapered UN55. This is a 68 width bike. Any other suggestions?
    I actually prefer ST BBs. Are they as stiff and lightweight as Hollowtech? No. Empirically speaking, however, STs tend to roll smoothly for eons, and with the bearings inside, they're protected from the elements. They're also an "off-the-shelf" item in many locales. SKF makes a ST with a ten year / 65,000 mile warranty (!): SKF Bottom Bracket

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskadude View Post
    Brakes RIM V brakes: One suggestion was XTR V Brakes.
    Since your bike obviously doesn't have disc tabs, Mark_BC's advice for BB7s (outstanding brake, by the way) isn't applicable; though, I do agree with his assessment of XTR components. Yes, they're in Shimano's MTB category of components, but they're more suited for racing. If Shimano is what you desire, then XT, SLX or even Deore would likely be better suited for your "robust" requirement. I've used Avid Single Digit 7s and they're a good item. I know they've been used on tandems, so loaded touring shouldn't be a problem with them.

  4. #4
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    I second the BB7 comment. I think you will find yourself searching for more V-brake pads in the middle of nowhere regardless of how many extra sets you may bring with you. BB7 discs are easy to setup, simple to adjust, cable actuated, and the pads and cables are cheap and small enough to pack almost anywhere. Plus they will last a lot longer than V-brakes!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonez68 View Post
    Since your bike obviously doesn't have disc tabs
    Bummer. But they do make a disc version. If you already have the frame you could get just the disc fork since the front brakes will be doing most of the work.

    This and this are interesting article comparing cantilever, V and disc brakes for touring. If I was riding the Himalayas on dirt roads I would definitely have a BB7 on the front.
    All I am saying is give pizza chants

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark_BC View Post
    If you already have the frame you could get just the disc fork since the front brakes will be doing most of the work.
    Yes, that's an option; especially with alaskadude's rim and hub selection (can do either disc or rim brakes).

    Honestly, though, V-brakes are totally up to the task. I'm friends with a guy (moderator on another site) who did plenty of difficult descents over the Himalayas with cantis (Tektro CR720) and was completely satisfied by their performance.

    For simplicity, ruggedness and power, V-brakes are excellent.

  7. #7
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    It may be cheaper to look for the M-750 or M-760 XT brakes vs. the XTR M-960.
    ptarmigan hardcore

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark_BC View Post
    I just bought a 525, they get good reviews for being rock solid. I think most of your gear is good. If you like grip shift go with that but I don't like it. I like simple thumb shifters.

    My major concern is using XTR V brakes. Do they even make those anymore? XTR is not made to be tough, it is made to be light. I went down that hill of the pass north of Manali and burned through a whole set of V brake pads, they will not last you in the Himalayas loaded down. I would get disc brakes with 180mm or even 200mm front rotors and bring lots of extra pads. Go with Avid BB7's set them up right and Speed Dial 7 levers, you can get them cheap on Jenson USA.
    There are lots of XTR on ebay. The LHT deluxe can only use canti or V brakes. I was actually worried about the 525 hubs, but have read many forum entries since that said what you said--rock solid. Im new to quite a bit of this, obviously.
    I might try to pick up a disk brake front fork--this sounds like a good idea. I built a Surly Ogre and it has disks and I love them. Ill have to think of this route. On the other hand, I dont even know where Im going, and it is flat as a pancake from Kathmandu to Bombay if I go that way. Ill look at the shimano V-Brakes suggested, or take the Deore V-Brakes off my REI novara Safari. They are quite sturdy. Good suggestions on here thanks a lot.

  9. #9
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    Did you say sram shifter and shimano derailleur? They don't match up. Sram pulls a little more cable than Shimano. I use the old Suntour power thumb shifters with my Shimano XT rear derailleur. They last for years. Friction shifters don't break. If you have a sram grip shift get a Sram derailleur.

    I use the plus tires with the blue strips for rainy winter commutes. For touring they are just too heavy. A flat every week or 3 is no big deal. A patch kit weighs 1 ounce.

    Xt hollowtech will last through every harsh environment.
    Rim brake pads are available world wide. BB7s work well, pads are available world wide.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisx View Post
    Did you say sram shifter and shimano derailleur? They don't match up.
    I believe SRAM attack grip shifters are compatible with Shimano derailleurs. See here.

    Quote Originally Posted by chrisx View Post
    Rim brake pads are available world wide. BB7...pads are available world wide.
    Agreed on the rim brake pads, but not so on the BB7 pads. I definitely wouldn't leave it to chance; check to see if bike shops in Kathmandu (for instance) have them available before assuming they do.

  11. #11
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    The Attack is a 2:1 ratio shifter, it wouldn't be my pick but it will work with Shimano ders. For a long day of touring I'd probably be looking at Woodchippers. Single Digit 7 V-brakes are less that $20 and will give you plenty of power (I'd pair them with Speed Dial Levers). I would consider BB7s. The pads on my current commuter have close to 3k Miles and are still fine (make sure they get burned in properly). To me the biggest argument for discs isn't that they stay cooler during long descents, it's the crud that gets between your rim and brake pad on wet days. I'm a bit of a luddite, but all my bikes are disc equipped now. Super jealous of your upcoming tour. Perhaps when I retire...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonez68 View Post
    Agreed on the rim brake pads, but not so on the BB7 pads. .
    Sorry type0 BB7s work well but the pads are not available everywhere. I noticed that rim break pads are $4 and disc pads are $40 in Central America.

    Friction shifters are the way to go. What do you do if they only sell 7 speed cogs when you need a new one. If you have friction shifters and a 9 speed XT derailleur you just buy it and a 7 speed chain and go on your way, until you find a 9 speed cog in a larger town. My friction shifter only pulls enough cable to move a Sram x9 through 8 of 9 cogs. The same shifter pulls enough cable to move a Shimano 9 speed XT, or Alivo 9 speed, or 10 speed XT through all the gears.

  13. #13
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    (OP)The first bike I bought came stock with SRAM attack and shimano cassette. So i figured it must be compatible, and then when I was building my surly Ogre I asked on theis forum and only got one reply and it said to get SRAM attack even though I hadnt made that suggestion. I now have like 4 sets of these same shifters. Im not too experimental and try to avoid getting a huge drawer full of spare stuff--even though that is happening anyway. Ill look at all those brakes, and decide which one. Probably just a good robust set of Deores, I have them on a bike and they are cool.
    I like trek bars. I looked at woodchippers, but I like the protection the trek bar gives the brake levers and shifters. It sort of loops around and keeps brush or whatever from catching. I also already have a set. Im going to have 22T in front and 36T on the rear of a 26 inch wheel. I read that works. I ll try it over the summer, and if that is not actually compatible, Ill put the 34T back on. I will take off to Asia in October, and go for 6 months. I spent 24 winters bumming around there with a backpack, but this is my first bike trip.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskadude View Post
    The first bike I bought came stock with SRAM attack...I now have like 4 sets of these same shifters.
    Using what you're comfortable with is a smart move. Sure, friction shifters are excellent for touring, but if you're not used to them, they can be an exercise in frustration. Incidentally, because of your comments, I'm now considering these. I've always been a trigger man, but would like to try grip.

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskadude View Post
    Im going to have 22T in front and 36T on the rear of a 26 inch wheel. I read that works.
    That's some serious low gearing--and I mean that in a good way. It's better to have it (low gearing) and not need it, than need it and not have it.

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskadude View Post
    I will take off to Asia in October, and go for 6 months.
    All the best to you, AD. Don't take any wooden nickels and keep the rubber side down.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskadude View Post
    I will take off to Asia in October, and go for 6 months.
    Bring some gold and silver coins, you may find that a monetary reset happens while you are away...
    All I am saying is give pizza chants

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark_BC View Post
    I just bought a 525, they get good reviews for being rock solid. I think most of your gear is good. If you like grip shift go with that but I don't like it. I like simple thumb shifters.

    My major concern is using XTR V brakes. Do they even make those anymore? XTR is not made to be tough, it is made to be light. I went down that hill of the pass north of Manali and burned through a whole set of V brake pads, they will not last you in the Himalayas loaded down. I would get disc brakes with 180mm or even 200mm front rotors and bring lots of extra pads. Go with Avid BB7's set them up right and Speed Dial 7 levers, you can get them cheap on Jenson USA.
    I see a disc fork on ebay. It also has a longer steering tube. I wanted to raise the handlebars a little anyway. I think Im clicking the button.

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