Where to get strong/light frame for cheap?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Where to get strong/light frame for cheap?

    I am looking for a strong light frame for cheap. I am going to build a MTB commuter and would like a good place to start or if anyone has one. Any advice is appreciated? Budget is $800 for complete build.

    Thx.

  2. #2
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    Pricepoint.com has the Sette Reken, Performancebike.com has the Access, and Nashbar.com has a nashbar frame all are under $100 dollars and will be as cheap as they come. Just a suggestion but you could buy something like this http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...om29pro_08.htm This bike will be much better than anything you can build for that money. You will still get the satisfaction of putting some of it together because they come partially assembled.
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  3. #3
    AZ
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    Great deal , check out this thread :
    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=621921

  4. #4
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    i wanna stay 26in rims for wheel strength. also are those frames you mentioned fairly light? or are they not worth building on?

  5. #5
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    What makes you think that 26 inch wheels are stronger than 29er? The 29er wheels will be nice for the on road use, and you can easily mount slicks.
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  6. #6
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    I like the Access frames from them better,I really like the finish and they're fairly light too...

    http://www.performancebike.com/bikes...7_20000_400314

  7. #7
    AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dremer03
    What makes you think that 26 inch wheels are stronger than 29er? The 29er wheels will be nice for the on road use, and you can easily mount slicks.


    26 inch wheels are stronger than 29ers .

  8. #8
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    personal exp. at 360lbs i had a mnonocog 29 er and the rims kept coming out of true. they were nev er straight. i sold the bike.

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    what is the difference between..

    Quote Originally Posted by CRed
    I like the Access frames from them better,I really like the finish and they're fairly light too...

    http://www.performancebike.com/bikes...7_20000_400314
    Teh 6061 alum and the 7005?

  10. #10
    AZ
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    6061 requires post welding heat treatment , 7005 generally does not require it .

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    so what does the 7005 benefit over the 6061?

  12. #12
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    Lighter and stronger
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  13. #13
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    I should mention it is lighter because it is stronger. They simply use less material. I just went from a 6061 Reken to a 7005 KHS frame and the metal is significantly thinner feeling.
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  14. #14
    AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dremer03
    Lighter and stronger


    What you dont know would fill a library , you really should not post about things that you have zero practicle knowledge of instead of your cut and paste replies . 7000 series is more brittle than 6000 and much more difficult to weld properly , you must not have read that part though .

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dremer03
    I should mention it is lighter because it is stronger. They simply use less material. I just went from a 6061 Reken to a 7005 KHS frame and the metal is significantly thinner feeling.

    What?????
    Originally Posted by Vtolds/Dremer03---- "assume any bikes left unlocked and unattended are free to take"

  16. #16
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    ok... So at 360lbs will these frames be stiff and sturdy for some commuting and minor curb jumping if ever needed to avoid crash?
    Last edited by ccd1977; 05-28-2010 at 10:04 AM.

  17. #17
    AZ
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    This one that CRed posted is very strong and an excellent value too :
    http://www.performancebike.com/bikes...7_20000_400314

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccd1977
    personal exp. at 360lbs i had a mnonocog 29 er and the rims kept coming out of true. they were nev er straight. i sold the bike.
    I know I'm taking this off topic now, but I think you are really confusing issues here. The Monocog is fairly low-end, and I can't see equally cheap 26" wheels holding up well under you either (no offense intended). Cheap, machine-built wheels often go out of true easily even for really light riders irregardless of wheel size

    I weigh a bit over 200lbs with my gear and ride hard on rough trails with a rigid fork on my 29er. I have only had my wheels trued twice in the last 2.5 years. My wheels are nothing fancy at all, but are a step up from the Monocog wheels. There are many other 29er riders who are larger than me and ride harder than me who don't have problems either.

  19. #19
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    Thank you gents. This will help ALOT! I may get the blue one.

  20. #20
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    I doubt anyone makes a frame suitable for 360lbs. You should consider getting a custom-made one. Maybe an off-the-shelf DH rig could be OK.

  21. #21
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    29er rims

    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    I know I'm taking this off topic now, but I think you are really confusing issues here. The Monocog is fairly low-end, and I can't see equally cheap 26" wheels holding up well under you either (no offense intended). Cheap, machine-built wheels often go out of true easily even for really light riders irregardless of wheel size

    I weigh a bit over 200lbs with my gear and ride hard on rough trails with a rigid fork on my 29er. I have only had my wheels trued twice in the last 2.5 years. My wheels are nothing fancy at all, but are a step up from the Monocog wheels. There are many other 29er riders who are larger than me and ride harder than me who don't have problems either.
    My next setup will be better rims. Tired of the Alex rim stuff. Besides with longer spokes there is more flex and more rotational wieght. With 26in rims I can go lighter and with shorter spokes be stronger.

  22. #22
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    i like that access frame but they are out of the blue in my size.
    any experiences with the road bike frames on there?

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccd1977
    My next setup will be better rims. Tired of the Alex rim stuff. Besides with longer spokes there is more flex and more rotational wieght. With 26in rims I can go lighter and with shorter spokes be stronger.
    the difference in flex is marginal to unnoticeable with properly built wheels in either size. They are certainly heavier, but because of conservation of energy, you gain back whatever extra energy you used to spin up the wheels as extra momentum. "29er" is just another word for 700c wheels, which are the most common size for purpose-built commuter bikes, road bikes, and touring bikes for people of all sizes. Not trying to convince you to go back to a 29er or that they're are better, just that I'm quite pedantic about un-countered comments that get turned into "facts I read on the internet" by people browsing through. Anyway.... enough of that crap from me

    Are you looking for a MTB commuter over a road bike style commuter because you plan on using it for double-duty on trails or because your route involves off-road shortcuts or other rough roads or staircases or other reasons? If you do plan on being rough with this bike my only other advice is to stop being so focused on weight. I am well aware that rotational weight counts extra, but adding a pound in weight for even stronger 26" rims and such is only about 2 tenths of 1 percent of the total weight of you and the bike, and I think would be well worth it to get something reliable and dependable for long term commuting.

  24. #24
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    FLex

    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    the difference in flex is marginal to unnoticeable with properly built wheels in either size. They are certainly heavier, but because of conservation of energy, you gain back whatever extra energy you used to spin up the wheels as extra momentum. "29er" is just another word for 700c wheels, which are the most common size for purpose-built commuter bikes, road bikes, and touring bikes for people of all sizes. Not trying to convince you to go back to a 29er or that they're are better, just that I'm quite pedantic about un-countered comments that get turned into "facts I read on the internet" by people browsing through. Anyway.... enough of that crap from me

    Are you looking for a MTB commuter over a road bike style commuter because you plan on using it for double-duty on trails or because your route involves off-road shortcuts or other rough roads or staircases or other reasons? If you do plan on being rough with this bike my only other advice is to stop being so focused on weight. I am well aware that rotational weight counts extra, but adding a pound in weight for even stronger 26" rims and such is only about 2 tenths of 1 percent of the total weight of you and the bike, and I think would be well worth it to get something reliable and dependable for long term commuting.
    The Alex DH 19 rims did not hold up to normal road riding. The first 1.5 mile, they were so badly warped, the brake was rubbing very hard. After a few truing, they stayed warped and made constant spoke clattering. It was non-stop. However, I do like 29er rims but they will have to be hand built. On the other hand, my main purpose is to treat this bike like a commuter/flat barred roadie with the options of jumping a curb to get on a side walk so I can continue to ride when the streets bike path dissappears. There will be no stairs, etc.. Maybe a 2 in bunny hop or a curb jump but this is not regular. Just to avoid situations. The tires will be slicks of some sort with a higher pressure. I just don't know which ones yet.

  25. #25
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    that access frame, what does 9r on the other one mean?

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by roc865
    that access frame, what does 9r on the other one mean?
    that's the version for 29" wheels

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