What type of bike for my riding style?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    What type of bike for my riding style?

    Hey guys,

    First of all, I'm new here, so, hi!

    I used to ride a couple of years ago a lot more but college has taken all of my time lately, plus my bike was stolen. However, I want to get back into the sport so I am in the market for a new bike. I know a little about it all, but I'm definitely far from an expert. My old bike was a Specialized Hardrock Comp FS (year 2000 or so) and it seemed to do what it needed to do... But, I think I'm ready to do more on a better bike now that I'm older.

    My question is what type of bike should I get? Personally I like XC hardtails. Basically my riding style consists of two main things. One is riding around campus in an urban environment. I really like to ride stairs, jump small amounts of stairs and small flats (nothing over 3-4 feet), and other pretty small stuff like that. The other type is trail riding here in Alabama. Nothing huge, and definitely not considered "downhill." It's both up and down, small roots, maybe some smaller dirt jumps, etc. I have no desier for huge dirt jumps or really fast downhill stuff, not to mention it isn't even offered in my area. I wonder if a mild dual suspension setup would be better for the urban stuff or if a hardtail would suffice. I also like hardtails because they're cheaper, lighter, and easier to maintain.

    I have heard something about certain XC frames not being that great for jumps at all, which also worries me. I know that I want at least mid-grade discs and at least Deore components, as well as a better than Dart level fork.

    1) My budget for a new bike is in the range of 1000 us dollars.
    2) As far as bikes I've already considered, which are all hardtails, I am looking at things such as Specialized Rockhopper (top model), Jamis Dakota Sport, IronHorse Warrior 5.0, Trek 6500, etc. I also have just started looking at the underdog IBEX, but I'm not too sure on all of that stuff. Call me a sucker for name brands. If I see enough praise from a community such as this though, I would be more than willing to buy a lesser known brand.
    5) I am 22 years old, 6'2'' and weigh 165 lbs.
    6) I am not too picky as to where I buy from. Either LBS or online new probably though. I am weary of used bikes but a local buddy keeps pushing me towards then so I might give them a glance if something really nice comes along.
    7) Please offer any advice at all!

    I also have two other small questions. When it comes to forks, what is an 'air fork' and does it require that I own a pump or any more maintenance? Also, what is the difference between double-butted and triple-butted al frames?

    I think that is everything but I might be back with more.

    THANKS!

    -John

  2. #2
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    Welcome to the Forums John!

    Out of the bikes you mentioned, the Rockhopper.

    May I recommend building a bike. It would be a great experience, and you can always have a shop do what you don't know how to.

    May I further recommend this frame...

    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/141...tail-Frame.htm

    We wonderful folks (maybe not me) here at mtbr will be able to guide you to what parts to buy.

    DON'T be overwhelmed. I believe it is a good experience to have if you want to drop 1000$ on a bike.

    Air forks require more maintenance in general. You would need your own fork-specific pump too.

    Butted means differences in the wall thickness of the frame. Double would mean 2 thicknesses and it is thicker at one end because it requires more strength at that end and thinner at the end to save weight. Triple just means three wall thicknesses.

    18 inch should fit you for your riding styles.
    Last edited by tibug; 02-27-2007 at 08:01 PM.
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  3. #3
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    Oh, yea and I can find you a much better parts spec for 1000 bucks than what you want.
    I wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.

  4. #4
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    So you think that Reken frame would be tough enough for some small urban jumps, stairs, etc? I have been told to look for a more burly xc frame such as Kona Caldera or Specialized Hardrock for my style.

    Perhaps building a bike would be a good idea, or even upgrading a used Hardrock or something if I can find one cheap. The only thing is that some people warned me that it might end up costing more in the end due to the fact that big companies get good deals on their parts since they're in bulk, etc. I just browsed around a tiny bit and found that a fork seems to be the most expensive part by far.

  5. #5
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    As long as you know what you're looking for and/or have an LBS check it out, there's really no problem buying used...
    lets you save a ton of money in a lot of cases.
    I'm with you on being iffy on internet-only bikes, regardless of how many MTBRers are sprung on Ibex.
    again, used is awesome, craigslist is your friend...
    once you start getting into the realm of decent bikes, there are enough people who always 'need' to have the best new stuff that the 'lesser' old stuff gets sold with little wear and tear in a lot of cases.

  6. #6
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    You could try...

    The Specialized P series. It is more in line with an Urban style of riding meaning some tricks and jumps. I just rode one today at the shop and it wasn't a bad bike at all. Probably not the greatest bike for long epic XC rides and if that turns out to be more in line with what you're looking for than perhaps another bike is the key but the P series is a burly series of bikes that could take some punishment. The one I rode was built with SRAM components and the Marzochi Bomber fork (not sure which one exactly). It's just an idea and I know that at least 2 in that series would work in your price range and I think the top end (the one I rode) would be about 1300 so maybe a bit much for you. Check out their web page. My other suggestion is to comb through the internet from forums like this one to the company web pages to get a good idea of what's available so you have a base of knowledge when you go to the shop to buy. I was able to use my knowledge of the Santa Cruz web page and the price points of the bikes I've been drooling over for a year to make sure that the bike dealer (a shop I haven't dealt with a whole lot) was on the up and up. It's fun and well worth the time. Heck even when I'm happy with what I'm riding it's still fun to surf through the various companies web pages to see what's out there and what's going on in the industry. Good luck in your pursuit, I hope you find what you're looking for.

  7. #7
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    Ibex is a very good net company with awesome CS. Something like the Trophy Comp wil have no problem doing what you ask of it & taking you a few levels up with ease.

    My oppinion on air is that it is more user friendly, can be adjusted to different riding styles, ride weights just plain universal. A shock pump is about $25 extra, whoopdee.

    https://www.ibexbikes.com/Bikes/TR-COMP-Details.html

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by AadosX
    So you think that Reken frame would be tough enough for some small urban jumps, stairs, etc? I have been told to look for a more burly xc frame such as Kona Caldera or Specialized Hardrock for my style.

    Perhaps building a bike would be a good idea, or even upgrading a used Hardrock or something if I can find one cheap. The only thing is that some people warned me that it might end up costing more in the end due to the fact that big companies get good deals on their parts since they're in bulk, etc. I just browsed around a tiny bit and found that a fork seems to be the most expensive part by far.
    Yes, I do think it is tough enough. I know what fork to get you too. Yes, it most likely won't be the best parts, considering you can get full XTR for so cheap, but those frames are definitely not meant for jumping. I consider the Reken a more all mountain bike, and it will be able to handle 3-4 foot jumps easily (with the right parts). If you want a super strong freeride type bike (but you pay in weight) then click here...

    http://www.rscycle.com/s.nl;jsession...6&it=A&id=8090

    That's pretty much the best deal for the money, but it does weigh 35 pounds, and it is a freeride bike, so its not best for XC.

    Here is the fork I had in mind...

    http://www.ebikestop.com/Items/004-fk6076?

    Here are the reviews of it...
    http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/2006_fro...t_125143.shtml

    I have one, but have yet to ride it as it is on an incomplete bike build (frame is reken )

    I agree that used is good, but make sure it is not too used.

    Upgrading is good to, especially with a strong and versatile frame like the Rockhopper.
    Last edited by tibug; 02-28-2007 at 04:28 AM.
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  9. #9
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    I'm not sure about going the buy a frame and build it. At least not for your first bike.

    I agree that the IH Yakuza is a very good bike (2 friends of mine have them and it looks pretty good for what they do).

    Another option is Banshee Calango (which is a complete bike). Speedgoat has them for 1,200:

    http://www.speedgoat.com/product.asp?part=113473

    I have the Banshee Viento, which I think it's the same bike except you buy only the frame, and it's light and strong. Well, maybe not that light for XC, but good weight.

    I think that for what you want, you're better of buying a sturdy hardtail than a Full suspension.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by rzozaya1969

    I have the Banshee Viento, which I think it's the same bike except you buy only the frame, and it's light and strong. Well, maybe not that light for XC, but good weight.
    You got the Banshee ayy

    Back on subject, a good guality bike will hold up to what you will be doing, just stay away from brands like Motiv & Huffy.
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  11. #11
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    More recommendations

    Quote Originally Posted by AadosX
    My question is what type of bike should I get? Personally I like XC hardtails. Basically my riding style consists of two main things. One is riding around campus in an urban environment. I really like to ride stairs, jump small amounts of stairs and small flats (nothing over 3-4 feet), and other pretty small stuff like that. The other type is trail riding here in Alabama. Nothing huge, and definitely not considered "downhill." It's both up and down, small roots, maybe some smaller dirt jumps, etc. I have no desier for huge dirt jumps or really fast downhill stuff, not to mention it isn't even offered in my area. I wonder if a mild dual suspension setup would be better for the urban stuff or if a hardtail would suffice. I also like hardtails because they're cheaper, lighter, and easier to maintain.

    I5) I am 22 years old, 6'2'' and weigh 165 lbs.
    6) I am not too picky as to where I buy from. Either LBS or online new probably though. I am weary of used bikes but a local buddy keeps pushing me towards then so I might give them a glance if something really nice comes along.
    7) Please offer any advice at all!

    I also have two other small questions. When it comes to forks, what is an 'air fork' and does it require that I own a pump or any more maintenance? Also, what is the difference between double-butted and triple-butted al frames?

    I think that is everything but I might be back with more.

    THANKS!

    -John
    Welcome to the Forums, John.

    Based on what you ladi out, give consideration to something like the Giant STP and the Specialized P Series bikes. Definitely two good urban assault rides that can be used on the trails. Generic hardtails (like the ones you are considering) are not made to withstand this type of riding over a long period of time, and probably shouldn't be considered. Can you use a full suspension bike for this type of riding? Yes you can, but you'll see that a majority of people use hardtails. Regarding forks, I don't believe an air sprung fork will necessarily require more maintenance than a coil fork. Yes, you will need a dedicated shock pump though. Regarding the concept of butting, it is a process that makes the tubing thinner in low stress areas and thicker in high stress areas such as joints. It's used primarily as a way to make a bike strong, but lighter. I would persoanlly loom for a straight gauge tubed bike if you're doing urban riding, unless the tubing is uber strong and uber thick to begin with.

    Just my thoughts. YMMV.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    You got the Banshee ayy ....


    Yep! Its a very, very good hardtail for the trails I do, and it can also be run on urban runs.... I just think that if the original posted decides to build it from frame up, it will go above his budget...

  13. #13
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    look into some DJ hardtails or AM Frames like the Chameleon...

  14. #14
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    The Chameleon...

    Is a great bike from all of the reviews here and from around the stores. I have 06 White one on order right now and am swapping parts to the frame. The problem with the Chameleon is that the frame is $550 which isn't bad but a bit pricey compared to others like the Coves and a complete bike starts at around $1600 which is more than the original amount I think. The P series is cool because you get the good stout frame with some lower end components to get you started for about the same as the Chameleon frame.

  15. #15
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    [QUOTE=rzozaya1969]I'm not sure about going the buy a frame and build it. At least not for your first bike.

    But then you get exactly what you want, and if you want to spend 1000 bucks on a [hardtail] bike, I would build it. Besides, he said he rode 2 years ago, so he's not that inexperienced.

    But you guys are giving some great advice also, so consider carefully John.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by rzozaya1969
    Yep! Its a very, very good hardtail for the trails I do, and it can also be run on urban runs.... I just think that if the original posted decides to build it from frame up, it will go above his budget...
    Awesome I dont think i ever saw pic's since we were talking last about HT's. Is that my JoeBlow pump that fell apart on me back there!!!!

    I agree building is not for the new & can get up in price.
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  17. #17
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    You can save some bank by picking up one of those Yakuzas advertised here

    like Tibug said It looks like a good hucking FR bike for the $600.
    May be a bit too slow and heavy for XC riding.

    The Motobecane at Bikes direct would be a better/lighter all mountain hardtail.

    You need to be smooth to do any drops on a XC rig like the Jamis and if you case a DJ plan on replacing a bunch of parts.

    For a full suspension rig the Ironhorse MK3 looks good with a nice wheelset/fork/brakes. Check the reviews on the frame and see if it suits your riding style.
    Last edited by Mr. Doom; 03-01-2007 at 08:57 AM.
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  18. #18
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    From bikesdirect.com's website

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Doom
    The Motobecane at Bikes direct would be a better/lighter all mountain hardtail.

    You need to be smooth to do any drops on a XC rig like the Jamis and if you case a DJ plan on replacing a bunch of parts.
    Much like Mr. Doom claims about being careful with the Jamis, The Motobecane is not a bike for stairs or dops, and bikesdirect even tells you this:

    "This bike is truly versatile. Put slicks on this baby and give those roadies a good scare as this is as light as many road bikes out there. Box Stock- you've got a superlight trail bike that can handle just about anything and anywhere. (No Hucking Please)"

    I took the liberty of bolding and coloring the text red, the verbiage is otherwise lifted directly from bikesdirect.com's page with the MOTO Fantom Comp.

    Like I said in my original post, typical XC bikes are not made for urban assault, and that goes for almost every XC bike out there, not just the MOTO. Don't bring a knife to a gunfight. Buy the right equipment for the job.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Call_me_Clyde

    Like I said in my original post, typical XC bikes are not made for urban assault, and that goes for almost every XC bike out there, not just the MOTO. Don't bring a knife to a gunfight. Buy the right equipment for the job.

    Bob
    The Sette Reken will most definitely be able to handle 165 pounds dropping 4 feet. The Ibex or Motobecane will not.

    Saving the world one painful truth at a time,
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    P.S. Bob, thank you for saying almost every XC bike! I also like your use of knife to a gunfight. Nice!
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  20. #20
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    Mr. AadosX when was the last time you hit up a 3-4 foot drop to flat Do you plan on hitting DJ's with 5 foot gaps or even 30 foot gaps Riding on campus what is the longest set of stairs you will be riding down 17
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  21. #21
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    At the risk of sounding like a super noob, what makes the Sette Reken so much better (stronger) than the other XC frames that basically look identical to it, at least in terms of how skinny it is?

    With the exception of possibly the Reken, I have decided that I definitely want something more than most XC hardtails such as Rockhopper, but less than a hardcore freeride or other bikes of that nature. I see Hardrock being the base entry to this type of bike... but wonder how much the Hardrock really is from the below listed bikes, frame wise.

    As far as the Yakuza Bakuto goes, is it heavier than other bikes such as Kona Caldera, Banshee Calango (out of my price range I think), and Santa Cruz Chameleon. These are the 3 leading frames I'm looking at right now.

    I believe that the Bakuto might be just a little more beef/weight than I want, as well as maybe the Calango. Physically it LOOKS the same, at least in the pics but I know there is more to it than that. In other words, what is the difference between all of those; or is it really just not that much when it comes down to it? Wow, it really comes down to a very small difference, but when I'm spending a thousand dollars on my college student budget, I guess I'm kinda picky lol. Sorry =P

    Oh and one last thing, what is the difference (on average) between the weight of the frames above and say a Rockhopper or other XC bike in the same price range?

    Again thanks for everyones help so much.

    -John
    Urban/XC/AM

  22. #22
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    If your huckin go with the Banshee, if your riding urban campus the door is wide open depending on skill.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    Mr. AadosX when was the last time you hit up a 3-4 foot drop to flat Do you plan on hitting DJ's with 5 foot gaps or even 30 foot gaps Riding on campus what is the longest set of stairs you will be riding down 17
    Hehe. The biggest drop i've done so far is about 2 feet but I would like to work my way up to about 4. I never plan on doing any dirt stuff at all. As far as stairs... um maybe jumping down sets of 4 at a time or so, and as far as riding, we have some that are like ~10 steps, 3 feet lvl ground, another 10, more lvl, another 10, more lvl... if that makes sense. =P
    Urban/XC/AM

  24. #24
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    think about getting a trials bike for what you're doing... or if you want options to hit the dirt int he future, get a DJ/FR HT... if you're like me and like Urban DH/FR stuff... Get a fullscale DH/FR rig... but not that latter suggestion requires some places to play at...

  25. #25
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    The skill is definitely not all there. I was decent at best back in the day, but I need to get back out there to polish back up. The thing is, I want a bike that can grow with me. I don't want to have to worry too much about upgrading immediately ya know. No hucking though, assuming I know what that is (crazy all out jumps, tricks, etc?)
    Urban/XC/AM

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by AadosX
    The skill is definitely not all there. I was decent at best back in the day, but I need to get back out there to polish back up. The thing is, I want a bike that can grow with me. I don't want to have to worry too much about upgrading immediately ya know. No hucking though, assuming I know what that is (crazy all out jumps, tricks, etc?)
    from what i'm getting from you is that you're not too sure on what you're going to be doing with the bike but plan to go bigger some day. I'd say get a 6" travel bike which weighs around 35 - 38lbs... Would make a good AM/FR bike...

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrpercussive
    from what i'm getting from you is that you're not too sure on what you're going to be doing with the bike but plan to go bigger some day. I'd say get a 6" travel bike which weighs around 35 - 38lbs... Would make a good AM/FR bike...
    And this comming from a guy that said HT's are all you need.

    You need to hook up with other riders & check out what they are riding & if that is what you want to ride also. I say this because mrperc was a dedicated XC rider till he saw the dark side, or maybe that should be said, the Light & is now on a 7 inch travel bike hucking 4+ foot drops after 6 months or so.
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    And this comming from a guy that said HT's are all you need.

    You need to hook up with other riders & check out what they are riding & if that is what you want to ride also. I say this because mrperc was a dedicated XC rider till he saw the dark side, or maybe that should be said, the Light & is now on a 7 inch travel bike hucking 4+ foot drops after 6 months or so.
    thank god for that too... btw... dave, we need to go riding dude... A lot of things have changed since we last rode and that's saying something... even hitting the kicker on chaparal now...


  29. #29
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    Ok I just searched here and then yahoo and even wikipedia for 10 minutes and couldn't find a clear definition for what hucking is LOL. It's used so often and has many other meanings outside of the biking world. What exactly does it mean? Just getting air or doing a trick? Going big?

    :x sorry.
    Urban/XC/AM

  30. #30
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    hucking means just jumping off things... going big... and hucking is also mostly implied when the landing is not smooth...

  31. #31
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    Huck/Hucking/Hucker: Mostly known as the type of rider that likes to do drops off large things such as; cliffs, roofs, North shore style ramps. The name is supposedly taken from the noise one makes when bunnyhopping their bike as hard as they can off the edge of a drop. The word "Huck" is also used in other sports, notably white water kayaking, but it still refers to the same thing.

    Huck to Flat: The act of dropping from a great height onto level ground. Sometimes unavoidable, but the act of doing it intentionally and/or repeatedly is widely regarded as unintelligent and unnecessarily damaging to one's bike. Nonetheless, most people get their start in more aggressive riding by this method, then progress to downramps and the pursuit of smoothness. Some are still playing catch-up.

    Huck to Splat: A Huck to Flat gone wrong. See Josh Bender.

    copied from farkin.net

    The Reken has monster chainstays, a nice gusseted head tube, and stealthy black paint. It is good for 3-4 foot drops with the right fork because it is, in my own experience, stiff but not brittle, gusseted, has welds that compare to a frame 400 dollars or more, has more AM geometry and structural design. I just emailed pricepoint(setteusa emails back after like a month. I asked if the frame could be used for drops, and if they say no they are probably just being conservative, but I will tell you anyway. Don't want ou stuck with the wrong frame!

    Oh, and ckeck out the reviews too...
    http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/XC_Hardt...t_125113.shtml

    If you are iffy about the Reken, check out this one. It is definitely storng enough for 3-4 foot drops, but it does cost 219$. I'm still pretty sure I could find you a good build for under 1000 bucks, easy if your budget was 1100. Can you stretch that far?

    http://www.leaderbikestore.com/pd_ld_516h1.cfm#

    Here is a good build kit for use with the reken or leader with you riding style and will fit your budget either way. Dj fork should be nice for around campus and not bad on trails, and if not adrenaline bikes will let you upgrade/change it. Also check out the other kits here...

    http://www.adrenalinebikes.com/store...%21&StartRow=1

    and here...

    http://www.pricepoint.com/thumb/3-Pa...-Kits-True.htm

    and here...

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/build_kit/

    and here...

    http://wheelworld.com/itemlist.cfm?f...arch=build+kit

    and here...

    http://www.greenfishsports.com/index...S&Category=291(no complete kits)

    and here...

    http://www.qbike.com/cgi-bin/find.cg...uct=on&lp=&hp=



    These deals rival the quality in many complete hardtails around 1000 bucks, plus especially with adrenaline bikes, you can get what you want or closer to it anyway.
    Quote Originally Posted by pinkheadedbug
    I got the Pricepoint SRAM build kit. They let you swap or drop parts and adjust the prices very fairly.
    Last edited by tibug; 03-02-2007 at 05:03 AM.
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  32. #32
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    Haha, dude... First of all I like you, for what it's worth. I appreciate the humor in the posts. 8-) And I appreciate that you care about me not getting stuck with the wrong frame! =P

    Again though thanks to you all for all the help.

    Anyways, first look, I really like that last frame you posted! Looks like it can take a beating, and seems to be very light too! The only thing is, I tried to compare the geometry to some of the other bikes I'm looking at (chameleon and kona caldera), and I think they were smoking something when they made that table/illustration lol.

    And yeah, $100 is $100, not a huge deal. But I'd rather be shaving $100 off the price than adding it. Either way, if any upgrade is really worth it (to me) then yeah I can do whatever. Obviously once I'm ready to do it all, I will carefully research and ask about each part before I buy anything, but I figured the frame was a good place to start. =)
    Urban/XC/AM

  33. #33
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    The upgrade to the Leader is definitely worth it. It will, without any doubt whatsoever, be able to handle 3-4 foot drops, while the Sette Reken will too, but it won't be quite as durable.

    HAHA that table is funny. A 41.8 inch headtube! LOL, yea they messed up. Yea, the frame is a good place to start. I was getting ahead of myself.

    [QUOTE:AadosX]Haha, dude... First of all I like you [/QUOTE]

    That makes 2 of us...
    I wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Call_me_Clyde
    Much like Mr. Doom claims about being careful with the Jamis, The Motobecane is not a bike for stairs or dops, and bikesdirect even tells you this:

    "This bike is truly versatile. Put slicks on this baby and give those roadies a good scare as this is as light as many road bikes out there. Box Stock- you've got a superlight trail bike that can handle just about anything and anywhere. (No Hucking Please)"


    Bob
    Yep it is a X-Country bike.
    I would add that the #1 difference between any bike is the wheelset. With some burly wheels most X-Country rigs can be converted into All-Mountain machines.
    Frame flex/strength is a minor factor compared to fit and wheel strength although it plays more of a roll for bigger riders.

    I see these little kids tearing up the dirt jumps on wall-mart specials that would die a quick death under my 175lb. arse.
    The wheel is a extension of the foot

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by AadosX
    I see Hardrock being the base entry to this type of bike... but wonder how much the Hardrock really is from the below listed bikes, frame wise.

    As far as the Yakuza Bakuto goes, is it heavier than other bikes such as Kona Caldera, Banshee Calango (out of my price range I think), and Santa Cruz Chameleon. These are the 3 leading frames I'm looking at right now.

    I believe that the Bakuto might be just a little more beef/weight than I want, as well as maybe the Calango. Physically it LOOKS the same, at least in the pics but I know there is more to it than that. In other words, what is the difference between all of those; or is it really just not that much when it comes down to it? Wow, it really comes down to a very small difference, but when I'm spending a thousand dollars on my college student budget, I guess I'm kinda picky lol. Sorry =P

    Oh and one last thing, what is the difference (on average) between the weight of the frames above and say a Rockhopper or other XC bike in the same price range?

    Again thanks for everyones help so much.

    -John
    The frames of all the bikes mentioned will not be that different IMO.
    It is the fork/wheels that will add weight and hucking capabilities.

    It sounds like you are looking for a general All-Mtn bike.
    The Hardrock is OK but has a craptastic fork that will need hucking into the recycle bin.

    It is not easy to find a great All-Mtn. ride for under $1000, (although it should be).

    Look for a bike with a Tora318 or Recon with Motion Control, 32mm stanchions and decent dampening, the good zokes/foxes are $$$.
    The wheel is a extension of the foot

  36. #36
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    Pricepoint replied with the following...

    This is a XC frames which does not take much abuse; you can get the
    Shadow frame for jumping stairs and street riding.

    -----------------

    I would recommend the Sette Shadow, but for a 6 ft 2 rider, a 16 inch would probably be a stretch even for urban, and it would definitely be too small for XC. You still can consider it though. With a long seatpost and a long stem, it may even be okay for XC.
    I wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by AadosX
    I figured the frame was a good place to start.
    On the other hand you could start out and build your bike around the suspension fork. LOL...

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...r+Fork+07.aspx
    I wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.

  38. #38
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