what frame fits my wheelset 12x142 tru-axle- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    what frame fits my wheelset 12x142 tru-axle

    Hi,
    looking for a Ti frame, but see most of them have QR dropout's.
    is there a conversion i can do on a frame to adapt to my wheelset?
    I9 classic with 12x142 spacing.

  2. #2
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    I think those hubs can be converted to 135qr

  3. #3
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    I was thinking the other way around, wanted to keep the tru-axle

  4. #4
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    Here's a frame: KONA BIKES | 2016 BIKES | ORIGINALS | Raijin

    Come's with 135 qr dropouts, but 142x12 thru axle dropouts are available.
    2020 Turbo Levo SL Expert Carbon

  5. #5
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    It's ridiculous to choose a frame just because it's 142x12. Double ridiculous for a hardtail, where rear end stiffness is irrelevant. Triple ridiculous to not even consider what wheel size the frame is intended for.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    It's ridiculous to choose a frame just because it's 142x12. Double ridiculous for a hardtail, where rear end stiffness is irrelevant. Triple ridiculous to not even consider what wheel size the frame is intended for.
    NAH, same reason people don't buy or sell new 26" bikes anymore.

    but it seems like OP barely looked anywhere, I just looked at a few manufacturers and it seems like they all use 12x142. Moots for example.

  7. #7
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    I learned alot since the post, so easy on me. reason i asked is, i bought a wheel set with the tru-axle, later found out it's not very common spacing unless you have newer style frame.
    however i can get an adaptor kit from I9 to convert to different spacings.
    so really this post is kinda ridiculous, however I'm still looking for a good medium Ti frameset.

  8. #8
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    forgot to mention it's a 29er. why all these ridiculousssses?
    you need a good talk with the manufactures about hardtail bla bla stiffness. i didn't invent them.

    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    It's ridiculous to choose a frame just because it's 142x12. Double ridiculous for a hardtail, where rear end stiffness is irrelevant. Triple ridiculous to not even consider what wheel size the frame is intended for.

  9. #9
    > /dev/null 2&>1
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    He's right, you should buy a frame that supports your needs first and foremost, not one that fits a wheel. Furthermore, TI is an exotic, expensive, underperforming frame material. To seek it out, for a specific wheel, is foolhardy, and significantly limits your choices for geometry and ride.

  10. #10
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    How good is your "good"?

    To some, as good as it gets = Steve Potts. Erikson is also a consideration at that "good" (more like God tier) level, that is basically heirloom quality.

    Then you have the other quality focused builders, like Firefly, Seven, etc. that have elevated their work to artisan level.

    Then you have the tier that's passionate, and wants to put out good product, but don't believe customers should pay for overkill levels of quality, but want something functional, made from the the same quality base materials. Ex. Lynsky (who also builds frames for others, like Kona).

    Then you have the questionable tier, that gets their material from Asia that is not quite comparable to the material that's available in further developed 1st world countries, perhaps using tooling and machinery that's fairly dated, but is priced well enough that you can afford to say you have Ti. Not a bad choice if you rationalize that even if it fails in less than 10 years worth of riding, you got your money's worth, and it'd probably be relatively outdated or maybe the owner gets tired of it by then anyways. Ex. Carver, Motobecane/BikesDirect
    "The challenge is not in developing new ideas, but in escaping old ideas."

  11. #11
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    TI is getting more and more popular, why is it underperforming? what material would you recommend?
    really didn't plan on buying the frame just because it fits, i was just curious what frame it takes to fit that rear hub,

    Quote Originally Posted by Procter View Post
    He's right, you should buy a frame that supports your needs first and foremost, not one that fits a wheel. Furthermore, TI is an exotic, expensive, underperforming frame material. To seek it out, for a specific wheel, is foolhardy, and significantly limits your choices for geometry and ride.

  12. #12
    > /dev/null 2&>1
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spattah View Post
    TI is getting more and more popular, why is it underperforming? what material would you recommend?
    really didn't plan on buying the frame just because it fits, i was just curious what frame it takes to fit that rear hub,
    TI bikes are only made by a few small manufacturers as Varaxis has documented well above. The majority of high end bike manufacturers choose carbon. A carbon hardtail will be just as stiff and light, and generally, for significantly lower cost.

    That being said there are some great deals on Bikesdirect.com right now for Motobecane fly's @ $1099 frame only. I have no experience with that bike.

  13. #13
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    I think the entire Transition Bikes line is 12x142.


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  14. #14
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    isn't carbon the easer to break? lots of rocks bouncing off my alum now,
    how would they hold up on gravel?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spattah View Post
    isn't carbon the easer to break? lots of rocks bouncing off my alum now,
    how would they hold up on gravel?
    Frame material isn't really very important. Alu holds up fine. CF holds up fine. Steel holds up fine. Ti holds up fine. Gravel isn't gonna harm any frame. They all ride basically the same too; the difference is nuance and completely overshadowed by geometry, component spec, tire choice, and cockpit set up. Heck, you can build a horribly harsh CF frame, an aluminum noodle, or a fragile steel frame if you want.



    This thread should probably really be about figuring out what frame best suits your parts kit and needs, but that wouldn't be very productive if you're not really honest about your own experience and intended use. It sounds like you don't have a clue what you want and just chose the most exotic seeming material.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
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  16. #16
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    True, i figured if I'm building a bike i will go with titanium because it's stronger and lighter, however since thats not a good idea, what would you guys recommend? never dreamed that carbon would be a good option, i see them on ebay all time claiming they fell and cracked the frame. my general use is lots of gravel roads and trails.

    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    Frame material isn't really very important. Alu holds up fine. CF holds up fine. Steel holds up fine. Ti holds up fine. Gravel isn't gonna harm any frame. They all ride basically the same too; the difference is nuance and completely overshadowed by geometry, component spec, tire choice, and cockpit set up. Heck, you can build a horribly harsh CF frame, an aluminum noodle, or a fragile steel frame if you want.



    This thread should probably really be about figuring out what frame best suits your parts kit and needs, but that wouldn't be very productive if you're not really honest about your own experience and intended use. It sounds like you don't have a clue what you want and just chose the most exotic seeming material.

  17. #17
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    You can make a better decision if you arm yourself with some knowledge. This is a good starting point: The Titanium Advantage | Metallurgy for Cyclists | Technical Articles | Support

    My personal opinion believes that a bike frame made from high grade aluminum tubing from a developed 1st world country crafted with merely decent workmanship, would likely outlast a frame made from mainstream/average grade of Chinese titanium, made by a master craftsman that has great experience with Ti, including thousands of Ti bike frames, at least under the conditions I ride under. Basically, don't underestimate the quality of materials. Maybe there's defects like voids, or something caused by impurities in the foundry stage. I also consider Taiwan to not be like China; look up the differences in their culture, including what motivates them, and the kind of business values they focus on.

    Regarding carbon, don't underestimate differences such as the kind of epoxy and other additives they use. The carbon fiber is mere reinforcement to the rest of the composite structure, also known as carbon reinforced plastic. Wish I could remember all the articles I've read that boosted my knowledge on this subject, but I'd definitely not consider the cheap no name Chinese carbon stuff to be any where as good as some of more expensive reputable brand name stuff that is heavily involved in design and every little detail and are made up of employees with a history of solid successful products. What's considered "good enough" to someone, might not be junk to another, as seen by the mixed experiences reported on such.

    Also, learn more about yourself and your true/realistic desires. That's critical in finding the best option that fits all your criteria.
    "The challenge is not in developing new ideas, but in escaping old ideas."

  18. #18
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    Steel tends to be heavier than any of the other materials, but Surly makes a modular dropout system that allows for 12x142 through axle, quick release or single speed.

    I love my Karate Monkey although it is a tad on the heavy side compared to my carbon frame.
    Help chart the mountains at www.appalachianbiketrails.org

  19. #19
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    Thanks, last few posts were helpful!
    Doing more research, I'm assuming carbon frames made by specialized, trek and cannondale would be top of the line.
    Any other brands that would be worth checking out?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spattah View Post
    Thanks, last few posts were helpful!
    Doing more research, I'm assuming carbon frames made by specialized, trek and cannondale would be top of the line.
    Any other brands that would be worth checking out?
    Bikes are largely a commodity- you get what you pay for. S,T, and C make excellent stuff and they make stuff to hit a price point. Their bigness only assures that they're gonna build frames that most people will be OK with. You have to turn to a smaller manufacturer if you have more niche features on your 'must have' list.

    I'd ride a frame built out of any material if it had the right geometry, felt good, fit my parts kit, and i had reasonable assurance it would hold up under my intended use. And that it didn't have a pressfit BB. F those.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  21. #21
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    Also beware, that once you ride a truly capable bike with impressive and confident handling, you become sort of spoiled, and your standards get raised to the point that you're unwilling to accept anything less... unless you go retro grouch, and disconnect yourself from society. That $2000 HT you've been eyeing? It becomes pleb/pedestrian.

    Demo a Yeti SB in whatever flavor, and you'll see what I mean.

    Honestly though, I think you shouldn't lock yourself into any prejudiced stereotype nor trust your own senses too much. Your senses might be telling you that the hot racy SB5c might be like hitting the lotto jackpot or dating a supermodel, but something like a Rocky Mtn Thunderbolt BC Edition might be that yin-yang balance that achieves inner peace, that pretty much allows you to settle down with 1 bike without any urge for years to come.

    Among all the bikes I've demo'd, and added to my list as potential bikes that can be my quiver killer, the Thunderbolt BC Edition is the only one I haven't found for sale used nearly as often as I'd expect for a model of its age. I'm guessing the owners really love them. This fact certainly has piqued my interest in it even more. I think the Spider 275c also achieves a very similar balanced and neutral feel. I dunno why, but they felt so perfect that it wasn't as thrilling/exciting.

    I digress... GL in your search.
    "The challenge is not in developing new ideas, but in escaping old ideas."

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post

    Among all the bikes I've demo'd, and added to my list as potential bikes that can be my quiver killer, the Thunderbolt BC Edition is the only one I haven't found for sale used nearly as often as I'd expect for a model of its age. I'm guessing the owners really love them. T
    ...maybe nobody bought them?
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  23. #23
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    Amazing how people think differently.
    Tough knowing which one is correct. Lol



    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    ...maybe nobody bought them?

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