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Thread: What forks

  1. #1
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    What forks

    I am looking for some help with finding a fork for my Giant ATX Pro. I will ride mostly XC trails and a bit of downhill, I won't be dropping off 6' boulders or any big air jumps. What forks should I be looking at for my app??

  2. #2
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    WOW not one reply All forks can't be as good as the other and they all can't be aimed at my type of riding

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    Post in the suspension forum and I bet you get more responses.
    Quote Originally Posted by ridelikeafatkid
    "MOMMY, I WANT TO RIDE LIKE THAT FAT KID!" true story.

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  5. #5
    skaterqwertyuiop
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    What is your budget, and do you use disc or rim brakes?
    It's not about what bike you ride, but how hard you tear it up

  6. #6
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    I am going to go with disc brakes. I plan to buy higher end forks and brakes and the rest of the build I plan to buy middle of the road components. Is this a good idea?

  7. #7
    Bicyclochondriac.
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    Quote Originally Posted by noobie39
    WOW not one reply All forks can't be as good as the other and they all can't be aimed at my type of riding
    Thousands of replies. Just use the search function, of spend some time looking over the first few pages of the suspension board.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  8. #8
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    Forks

    Not sure what size fork your frame can handle. You should find this out so you don't add something with too much travel and ruin the handling. You won't go wrong with anything from Fox or Rock Shox although I'd choose one or the other brand depending on whether you go 100mm or 120mm.

    Until recently I rode the 2009 Fox F100 RLC forks with 80mm of travel and they were amazing. Then I changed bikes and wanted a stiffer fork with 120mm travel. I went for the Rock Shox Reba Dual Air a) because I wanted the added stiffness of a 120mm maxle, b) because I'd read mixed reviews about Fox's FIT technology on 2010 forks, c) because Rock Shox forks appear to be easier to service these days. My new ride is much stiffer but how much of this is down to the maxle verses tougher rims and a stiffer frame is hard to say. I don't notice the additional travel but then I am riding more aggressively. The Fox fork felt buttery over small bumps while staying taught up front and making full use of it's travel without bottoming out. The Rock Shox fork doesn't achieve the same blend of characteristics as effectively yet but then I am still wearing it in and tuning the dual air. Generally though it feels taughter, less buttery over the small stuff and seems to save the last third of it's travel for something bigger than my local trail dishes out.

    I would ever buy a Manitou or Marzocchi fork again. Both are behind the curve and Marzocchi customer support is non-existent.

    In my experience, Fox forks are incredible out of the box and if I was buying 100mm or less they would be my first choice just because I know them and like them. That said I haven't tried a SID with 32mm stanchions or a Fox fork with FIT. Try for an 09 Fox fork if you can find one :-)

    The Reba is an awesome 120mm fork and if you are looking for trail toughness over race lightness then then maxle lite version is a good option.

    In terms of the rest of the build, it's not about how much you spend but what you want to do. High-end often means lighter which is fine if you race and have little body fat.

    If you don't then it's a false economy because you are paying hundreds more to shave grams off a bike when the rider could lose far more far cheaper.

    Also, lighter doesn't always equal better. e.g. if you don't race then buying expensive light wheelsto hit trails with your mates isn't the best idea when you could get something tougher and stiffer for less money that would be better suited to your riding needs. You could spend hundreds on light 24h rims and then find they squirm, don't give you confidence and need truing a lot.

    In terms of brakes, I just bought the Formula RX brakes which are half the price of high end brakes and they're great.

    In terms of groupsets, I like XT chainsets and front mechs and I have converted to SRAM for the rest. I think that the current generation of SRAM products has Shimano pipped for build quality but I don't know how that will translate to longevity.

    One place worth investing in a higher-end product is your wheel hubs.

  9. #9
    The White Jeff W
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frankthelab

    I would ever buy a Manitou or Marzocchi fork again. Both are behind the curve and Marzocchi customer support is non-existent.
    Puzzling comment. My riding buddy rides Marzocchi forks and has been telling me about the phone conversations he's had with them and it sounded to me like they were very helpful in getting him the right fork and getting it set up properly. This was in the past month. YMMV I guess.
    No moss...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frankthelab
    Not sure what size fork your frame can handle. You should find this out so you don't add something with too much travel and ruin the handling. You won't go wrong with anything from Fox or Rock Shox although I'd choose one or the other brand depending on whether you go 100mm or 120mm.

    Until recently I rode the 2009 Fox F100 RLC forks with 80mm of travel and they were amazing. Then I changed bikes and wanted a stiffer fork with 120mm travel. I went for the Rock Shox Reba Dual Air a) because I wanted the added stiffness of a 120mm maxle, b) because I'd read mixed reviews about Fox's FIT technology on 2010 forks, c) because Rock Shox forks appear to be easier to service these days. My new ride is much stiffer but how much of this is down to the maxle verses tougher rims and a stiffer frame is hard to say. I don't notice the additional travel but then I am riding more aggressively. The Fox fork felt buttery over small bumps while staying taught up front and making full use of it's travel without bottoming out. The Rock Shox fork doesn't achieve the same blend of characteristics as effectively yet but then I am still wearing it in and tuning the dual air. Generally though it feels taughter, less buttery over the small stuff and seems to save the last third of it's travel for something bigger than my local trail dishes out.

    I would ever buy a Manitou or Marzocchi fork again. Both are behind the curve and Marzocchi customer support is non-existent.

    In my experience, Fox forks are incredible out of the box and if I was buying 100mm or less they would be my first choice just because I know them and like them. That said I haven't tried a SID with 32mm stanchions or a Fox fork with FIT. Try for an 09 Fox fork if you can find one :-)

    The Reba is an awesome 120mm fork and if you are looking for trail toughness over race lightness then then maxle lite version is a good option.

    In terms of the rest of the build, it's not about how much you spend but what you want to do. High-end often means lighter which is fine if you race and have little body fat.

    If you don't then it's a false economy because you are paying hundreds more to shave grams off a bike when the rider could lose far more far cheaper.

    Also, lighter doesn't always equal better. e.g. if you don't race then buying expensive light wheelsto hit trails with your mates isn't the best idea when you could get something tougher and stiffer for less money that would be better suited to your riding needs. You could spend hundreds on light 24h rims and then find they squirm, don't give you confidence and need truing a lot.

    In terms of brakes, I just bought the Formula RX brakes which are half the price of high end brakes and they're great.

    In terms of groupsets, I like XT chainsets and front mechs and I have converted to SRAM for the rest. I think that the current generation of SRAM products has Shimano pipped for build quality but I don't know how that will translate to longevity.

    One place worth investing in a higher-end product is your wheel hubs.
    Thank you very much, very very helpful

  11. #11
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    I guess. When my remote lock-out cable needed replacing on my Marzocchi fork neither my LBS, my local shock tuning shop nor myself had any luck in getting replacements or any kind of support from Marzocchi and I was told that this was par for the course. But putting CS to one side I don't know why anyone would ever choose a Marzocchi fork in preference to a Rock Shox or Fox equivalent.

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