Ways to make the bike feel longer?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Ways to make the bike feel longer?

    So I just recently acquired a Scott Aspect Twenty. Love it! I'm fairly new to mountain biking. I have a weird body; Long torso and short legs. I went with a medium(18") frame because I wanted to protect the jewels...lol... The only problem is it just feels a little compact seat to handlebars, but felt the best of all the bikes I rode without going to the large. It's nothing major, but it does bug me a little on longer rides. I've already slid the seat back an inch or so on the post, and that helped a little. Just wondered if anyone had any other suggestions. Are there any lightweight seat posts with bends in them.. or handle bar holders (don't know the technical term) that take the bars out a tad bit over the front wheel further than average? Any other suggestions are welcome! Thank you

  2. #2
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    Reputation: zebrahum's Avatar
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    Your seat should be adjusted fore/aft so that you have the proper knee alignment. Make adjustments to the reach of the bike from the front of the bike.

    You can flip your stem if it has rise to it, you can get a longer stem, you can get wider bars, you can move spacers under the stem to above the stem, and you can get flat bars. All these things are ways to make the bike longer or feel longer.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the tips!

  4. #4
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    Any info you can share about your current setup? Stem length, degree +/-, seatpost setback degree? That will help. If you have something standard like 100mm stem with a 7degree rise, you might want to buy something like a 120mm maybe flipped to give it a drop. Or possibly choose a steeper angle like 17 degrees. I agree to that you want to lower the stem by moving the spacers. Your bars should not be higher than the nose of your saddle. Seatpost might be something like a 5 degree setback, you might be able to go like 20 or something. But make sure that doesn't mess up your geometry over the pedals.

  5. #5
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    what are your measurements, too? If you can handle a wider bar and it is comfortable, I'd strongly urge you to try one. Best to borrow a bar from a shop or a friend before dropping the money on one. If you are really concerned with dropping weight at the same time, a nice seatpost and light bars would be good ways to kill 2 birds with 1 stone - get comfy and drop weight. Gonna drop a few hundred $$ too.

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