Turner Flux v. Intense Spyder- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Turner Flux v. Intense Spyder

    Intended uses: XC riding, XC racing, nothing too burly or technical, long (enduro) rides/races.

    Discuss.

  2. #2
    ride hard take risks
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    Turner Flux would be my pick. Pivots are bushings so their is basicly no flex, zerk fittings to inject grease, excelent bike.

  3. #3
    thats right living legend
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    Me tooing...

    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    Turner Flux would be my pick. Pivots are bushings so their is basicly no flex, zerk fittings to inject grease, excelent bike.

    If it were me, I'de go Flux all the way. Turner CS, Turner durability, Turner mystic. Spyder might be snapper at the peddels, but who can tell at this level..

    EDIT: Though Intense mystic ante bad...
    Last edited by blackagness; 03-11-2006 at 08:20 AM.

  4. #4
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    both great, but different great, I would go with the Flux for sure based on your requirements and given Turners reputation. Not to mention, my friends' first hand experiences who own Fluxes.

  5. #5
    Daniel the Dog
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    Get the Spyder just to piss the Turner owners off :)

    The Spyder is a much different riding bike than a Turner. More bob resistant particularly in the small ring but not as plush...especially when braking hard. I don't know this for a fact but I would bet the Turner pivots would last longer.

    Also, I believe Spyders come in different top tube lengths: 23" and 24". I believe the Flux comes in a half inch increments. Check the specs. It is meaningful! My Tracer never felt right because the 23" was too small. The 24" might have felt good because I like long top tubes. My points is check the sizing.

    Also, lots of also's, I think the Flux would handle a bigger fork without getting all jacked up.

    Also, try and find a horst link Flux.

    Good luck,

    Jaybo

  6. #6
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    Buying a non-Horst Turner seems a bit pointless. I would get a Spyder.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by robotkiller
    Buying a non-Horst Turner seems a bit pointless. I would get a Spyder.
    Actually the TNT Turners are slightly better performers according to the Turner riders of both.

    The Turner is a very well built classic. The VPP is more advanced in design for standing pedaling efforts.

    The Intense 5.5 is more in the same class as the Flux in handling and climbing ability, but has more travel for the downhill.

    The Spider is more full race oriented, better matched against the Turner Nitrous in acceleration, but built more durable.

    Compared to the Flux the Spider is faster acceleration oriented without locking out the shock, and quicker handling. Fast trail riders like them too.

    Intense and Turner both have excellent reputations for quality and service.



    - ray

  8. #8
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    I'm a Flux owner and my .02 cents on this is for you to try out the Spyder, especially under trail conditions. The reason I say this is because I tried the Blur and the Spyder and did not like how either felt. The geometry wasn't a problem, but the feel in the suspension wasn't something that I liked. There was an odd vagueness I can't really describe; almost a disconnection at points of the travel. The Flux rear has a solid and connected feel, in contrast. It seems to make judging the edge of traction at the limit easy and intuitive.

    I'm not saying the Spyder is bad, but I think the VPP is hit or miss on how it feels for the rider. It's just not something that excites me in the least.

    The usual comparison of bushings vs bearings come up and the Turner sealed bushing system is smooth, long lasting, and helps with stiffness. Customer service is industry leading by a HUGE margin and I see it only getting better every year. Intense is no slouch by any means, but Turner is so far ahead that there's no comparison.

    To reiterate- try the spyder on the trails. You might like it, but it's not for everyone.

  9. #9
    ride hard take risks
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    Homer got lost!

  10. #10
    Daniel the Dog
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    It depends on what you like...

    Quote Originally Posted by derby
    Actually the TNT Turners are slightly better performers according to the Turner riders of both.

    The Turner is a very well built classic. The VPP is more advanced in design for standing pedaling efforts.

    The Intense 5.5 is more in the same class as the Flux in handling and climbing ability, but has more travel for the downhill.

    The Spider is more full race oriented, better matched against the Turner Nitrous in acceleration, but built more durable.

    Compared to the Flux the Spider is faster acceleration oriented without locking out the shock, and quicker handling. Fast trail riders like them too.

    Intense and Turner both have excellent reputations for quality and service.



    - ray
    If you like a firmer ride you would like the seastay Turner but if you want a plush ride without a lot of pedal and braking input, you might like a HL. I'm not buying it is better. It is Quality with Compromise. Turners new slogan...

    Jaybo

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by robotkiller
    Buying a non-Horst Turner seems a bit pointless. I would get a Spyder.
    Could not agree more, if one insist on a non-Horst the high-end bike to buy is a Ventana.

    I personally would go: first choice Spider (solid like a rock and great standing pedaler), second (or tie) Titus Racer-X (ditto), and third El Saltamontes in 4" configuration

    PS The fact is: The horst-link Turner works better then the non-Horst. It is plusher, climbs better in the rough and, you guessed it, brakes better too. Otherwise they are similar, that is: go out for a trip on smooth surface and they will work about the same ...
    Last edited by Davide; 03-12-2006 at 12:57 AM.

  12. #12
    ride hard take risks
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo
    If you like a firmer ride you would like the seastay Turner but if you want a plush ride without a lot of pedal and braking input, you might like a HL. I'm not buying it is better. It is Quality with Compromise. Turners new slogan...

    Jaybo

    Jaybo i would like nothing better then to not see another thread about the Turner crap from the primodona owners that know their sheiat dont stank. But i looked into the race results & bunch crapola & two bikes kept comming up Titus & Turner as real XC race bikes. If i was to go buy a XC race bike i would buy the Titus Racer X because it's not Turner. I like the way you are very mild about your comments, cool, keep it up!

  13. #13
    ride hard take risks
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davide
    : go out for a trip on smooth surface and they will work about the same ...

    I'v got my winter coat on flat will work.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    I'v got my winter coat on flat will work.
    which is where most races take place ... I have been riding on asphalt for two weeks since my rear wheel exploded ... I am starting to like my road bike (Kona Primo converted to road, 19 pounds a missile uphill) quite too much although I miss the mud

  15. #15
    ride hard take risks
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davide
    which is where most races take place ... I have been riding on asphalt for two weeks since my rear wheel exploded ... I am starting to like my road bike (Kona Primo converted to road, 19 pounds a missile uphill) quite too much although I miss the mud

    Obiwanthenobie no go sniffer.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    Obiwanthenobie no go sniffer.
    yeees

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davide
    yeees

    I do not think what you say is what you mean to say, we come from the dirt we must return to the dirt.

  18. #18
    Daniel the Dog
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    Dogfur

    I don't know if Turners TNT ride different than HL bikes. I admit! Just stirring the drink to keep things from getting stagnant in here. Having some fun.

    Jaybo

    PS get the Intense because the Turner has cheap bushings. Just joshing

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by homerjay
    Intended uses: XC riding, XC racing, nothing too burly or technical, long (enduro) rides/races.

    Discuss.
    I've spent some time on both. I had a demo Flux here at the shop that I spent about a year on and I've been on and off the Spider recently. Despite the fact that the Spider is 3/4 lb heavier, it would be my first choice when it comes to racing. It's got a bit quicker geometry and a 'snappier' feel. I definitely prefer the out of the corner acceleration of the Spider. Out here in CO, a lot of the races involve service road climbs at ski resorts. The Spider does feel like a hardtail and is a great climber in this application.

    The Flux climbs well, too, but it's more of a stay in the saddle and keep plugging away type of ride. If you like to do a lot of standing when you're climbing, the suspension of the Flux can sometimes get overwhelmed with pedaling. The Flux is truly an amazing bike, though. If you're looking for an all dayer, marathon/endurance racer, or a play bike, it's the ticket.

    Also consider that the Spider was developed around an 80mm fork and the Flux around a 100mm fork. The Spider feels at home with the 80mm and is still pretty good with 100mm. I've never ridden a Flux with 80mm but I'm told that it's quite sub-optimal.

    Food for thought - I hope some of this helps in your decision. The two suspension systems are wildly different, though. Try to get a test ride on each type.
    Redstone Cyclery
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