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  1. #1
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    Too good to be true?

    Hi all. New to the forums and just picked up a Bulls Wild One off eBay for $600. Wondering if anyone has heard of them or has one? It has the following specs:

    Uses: Trail, All Mountain, Allround
    Frame: Superlite 7005 Aluminum Triple-Butted
    Rear Suspension: Suntour Epixon-LO D Air Shock, w/lock-out
    Front Suspension: Suntour Epixon-TR-RL-R CTS AIR, 140mm, Remote Lock-out
    Rear Derailleur: Shimano XT M8000-GS, Shadow-Plus, 11-speed
    Front Derailleur: Shimano SLX M7020
    Shifters: Shimano SLX M7000
    Crankset: Shimano SLX M7000 BB, 36/26T
    Chain: Shimano HG601, 11-speed
    Bottom Bracket: Shimano XT MT800
    Cassette: Shimano SLX M7000, 11-speed, 11-42T
    Brakes: Tektro HD-M285, 2 hydraulic disc, 180/180mm
    Handlebar: STYX Aluminum, W:740mm, Raise:10mm, 9-degree Bend, Bore:31.8mm,
    Stem: STYX aluminum, 7-degree bend
    Seat post: STYX aluminum
    Saddle: BULLS
    Hubs: Formula
    Rims: RYDE HC-26S
    Wheel size: 27.5"
    Tires: Schwalbe Smart Sam K-Guard 27.5x2.25
    Pedals: Wellgo C288DU

    For the price I can't find anything better. On the bullsbikesusa website it shows the price at $2399 but I guess they are pulling out of the US market. It shipped yesterday and appears to be shipped from the manufacturer. They have limited sizes of other full suspension/ hardtails and roadbikes at really good prices it seems. Hope it is legit!


    Too good to be true?-bulls-wild-one.jpg
    Last edited by Barns; 07-08-2018 at 02:40 AM. Reason: More info

  2. #2
    Out spokin'
    Reputation: Sparticus's Avatar
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    $600? Unreal. Please finish the story once it arrives.
    =sParty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  3. #3
    SS Pusher Man
    Reputation: mtnbikej's Avatar
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    The seller looks like a legitimate seller.......BUT.......

    They may not be an authorized dealer. They are claiming that bikes are brand new, but sold with NO WARRANTY.
    Bicycles donít have motors or batteries.

    Ebikes are not bicycles

  4. #4
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    Arrived about a week ago...

    Turned out to be legit. I believe the seller is closing out the last of the inventory from their website on ebay. The shipment even listed the shipped from as Bulls Bikes. Anyway, it arrived in a new unopened Bulls box and came with paperwork on the suspension, bike manual, shimano instructions for some of the groupset and everything was wrapped up in foam and plastic very nicely.

    It did arrive with a flat rear tire which I found to be a tiny pinhole. Put a new tube in and rode it yesterday and it performed really well but a couple hours after returning, the rear tire was flat again with a pinhole in the tube so I'm trying to find the cause. Other than that, probably the best deal I've seen on a full suspension bike with better than entry level specs. A real steal IMO.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Too good to be true?-img_20180711_214323.jpg  

    Too good to be true?-img_20180711_214359.jpg  


  5. #5
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    I plan on changing out the saddle and grips as it is a little uncomfortable and converting the 2x11 to a 1x11. Probably going to go with a 34T NSB or Wolf Tooth. Maybe a new rear tire if I can't figure out the pinhole issue.

  6. #6
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    Well done for sure. Tire issue shouldn't be hard to solve. Enjoy!
    =sParty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  7. #7
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    good deal on that bike!

    first, take the time to get it set up so it fits your and suits your preferences:

    1. get it tuned up. bribe a local rider with mechanical skills with some beer to check the hub adjustment (always too tight on new bikes), de-stress the spokes, find a tire pressure that is appropriate for your riding, pre-stress the cables, align he brakes, tune the derailleurs, and check the torque on all bolts with a proper torque wrench. this will give the bike a fighting chance of surviving in the wild.

    2. riding a bike without first setting it up so it fits you is like running with your shoes untied. try some of these:
    • rotate the bars to a comfortable, natural position in a sitting and standing position. emphasis on standing, because that's where it counts.
    • rotate those brake levers down! they should be at an angle that is natural for your fingers to reach and control. about 45 degree downward angle works for most people.
    • you might want to move your brake levers inboard of the grips a bit. you should only need one finger on any modern, working hydraulic brake, so the end of the lever should be in a position where you can wrap your pointer finger around it. start by putting a space of 3/4" to 1" inboard from the end of the grip, fine-tuen from there.
    • that saddle looks really low. is that an efficient pedaling position for your legs? how tall are you and what size is that frame?
    • before you decide the saddle is uncomfortable, know this: all saddles are uncomfortable when you start riding. ALL of them. are you wearing padded cycling shorts, or a padded liner under baggies? is the saddle level, or does it have a tilt to it? is the suspension spring and sag set correctly for your weight? set it up right and then take time to get used to it. a saddle with thick, soft cushioning will feel comfortable at first, then it will become painful over time.
    • your handlebar height should be measured in relation to your bottom bracket (where your feet are), but relation to the saddle can often be a useful starting point. once you have the correct saddle height, get the grips close to the same height. adjust up and down from there. I find that I want my grips low, as that encourages me to stand up rather than sit down when terrain demands it. think of a beach cruiser with tall bars and a low, fat saddle- that bike is made to be ridden in the opposite way that a mountain bike is ridden. get the bike set up as "aggressive" as you are comfortable or you are giving yourself a handicap on the trail.
    • there is a good chance that a shorter stem will serve you well. that looks like a really, really long stem for a handlebar that size. stems are pretty cheap. 50-70mm is nice.
    • got any photos of the pedals that came with the bike? most of the cheap pedals that come with complete bikes are a liability for handling and for safety. do yourself a favor and get some decent pedals with big platforms that will stick to your feet and support your foot.
    • remove reflectors so you don't look like a dweeb.


    these are specific suggestions. check out a basic guide to "how to fit a mountain bike." some of the advice you find in fitting guides regarding saddle fore/aft position is questionable, but it's a good idea to try all that to give yourself a baseline fit.

  8. #8
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    you're in San Antonio? if you need an excuse to visit Austin any time soon, you can bring that bike up for me to give it a once-over. San Antonio has tons of fun trails within the city itself. I lived there for several years and spent endless hours exploring Salado Creek, Leon Creek, McAllister Park, etc. Flat Rock Ranch in Comfort, and there are hundreds of miles in Austin and out in the Hill Country.

  9. #9
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    I wish I could have gotten that deal!

    That would've been an upgrade to my wife's bike.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    good deal on that bike!

    first, take the time to get it set up so it fits your and suits your preferences:

    1. get it tuned up. bribe a local rider with mechanical skills with some beer to check the hub adjustment (always too tight on new bikes), de-stress the spokes, find a tire pressure that is appropriate for your riding, pre-stress the cables, align he brakes, tune the derailleurs, and check the torque on all bolts with a proper torque wrench. this will give the bike a fighting chance of surviving in the wild.

    2. riding a bike without first setting it up so it fits you is like running with your shoes untied. try some of these:
    • rotate the bars to a comfortable, natural position in a sitting and standing position. emphasis on standing, because that's where it counts.
    • rotate those brake levers down! they should be at an angle that is natural for your fingers to reach and control. about 45 degree downward angle works for most people.
    • you might want to move your brake levers inboard of the grips a bit. you should only need one finger on any modern, working hydraulic brake, so the end of the lever should be in a position where you can wrap your pointer finger around it. start by putting a space of 3/4" to 1" inboard from the end of the grip, fine-tuen from there.
    • that saddle looks really low. is that an efficient pedaling position for your legs? how tall are you and what size is that frame?
    • before you decide the saddle is uncomfortable, know this: all saddles are uncomfortable when you start riding. ALL of them. are you wearing padded cycling shorts, or a padded liner under baggies? is the saddle level, or does it have a tilt to it? is the suspension spring and sag set correctly for your weight? set it up right and then take time to get used to it. a saddle with thick, soft cushioning will feel comfortable at first, then it will become painful over time.
    • your handlebar height should be measured in relation to your bottom bracket (where your feet are), but relation to the saddle can often be a useful starting point. once you have the correct saddle height, get the grips close to the same height. adjust up and down from there. I find that I want my grips low, as that encourages me to stand up rather than sit down when terrain demands it. think of a beach cruiser with tall bars and a low, fat saddle- that bike is made to be ridden in the opposite way that a mountain bike is ridden. get the bike set up as "aggressive" as you are comfortable or you are giving yourself a handicap on the trail.
    • there is a good chance that a shorter stem will serve you well. that looks like a really, really long stem for a handlebar that size. stems are pretty cheap. 50-70mm is nice.
    • got any photos of the pedals that came with the bike? most of the cheap pedals that come with complete bikes are a liability for handling and for safety. do yourself a favor and get some decent pedals with big platforms that will stick to your feet and support your foot.
    • remove reflectors so you don't look like a dweeb.


    these are specific suggestions. check out a basic guide to "how to fit a mountain bike." some of the advice you find in fitting guides regarding saddle fore/aft position is questionable, but it's a good idea to try all that to give yourself a baseline fit.
    great advice
    always mad and usually drunk......

  11. #11
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    You scored on that one!

  12. #12
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    mack_turtle: Thanks for all the great info on set-up. I bought the book Zinn & The Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance and have been trying to learn as much as possible. I sent you a PM with a few questions. Yeah, I just moved to San Antonio a few months back. Thanks for the locations tips! Take care!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curveball View Post


    I wish I could have gotten that deal!

    That would've been an upgrade to my wife's bike.
    The seller (bbcalameda) has a few more bikes listed now. There is a nice bike called a Wild Cup 2 on there but it is a very small frame I think. They mostly have small and large frames on there now but they change inventory once in a while it seems.

  14. #14
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    Make sure check your crank arm bolt. It might not tight.
    I got bulls road bike and I forgot to check crank arm since I thought it should be done at factory. Also there are several reports that rotor was bent a little.

    Great value for bikes.
    Canít believe I could get full Ultegra groupset road bike for $600 (including eBay $100 coupon). I already have 26Ē full suspension and carbon rigid 29er but so tempting to get every XT groupset MTB bikes hahaha.
    Especially copperhead 3 with Fox fork for $800 and wild cup 3 for $1000.

  15. #15
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    Phenomenal deal. I wish I had seen your post two weeks ago

    To locate the pinhole, if the tire has a tube, remove the tube, pump it up a bit, put it in water and look for the bubbles.

    If it's tubeless remove the wheel, pump up the tire and and very dip the tread in water and slowly rotate the tire until you see bubbles. No bubbles, repeat with the whole rim dipped in water.

    Good luck with the tire.

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