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  1. #1
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    Steel

    What do you guys do to protect your steel frames? I just bought a Transition TransAm and want to make sure it lasts. I know Transition coats it with something in production to protect against the elements, but what other precautions would you guys suggest? I love the bike and I want it to last! Thanks

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    Weagle frame saver or linseed oil.

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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    Weagle frame saver or linseed oil.
    Where's the best place to get Weagle frame saver? Thanks!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pike14 View Post
    Where's the best place to get Weagle frame saver? Thanks!
    TreeFort, when it's in stock. May want to contact them.

    JP Weigles Frame Saver Aerosol Can **ORM-D** in Tree Fort Bikes Frame Prep (cat351)

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    Transition already treats the inside of the tubes so there really is no need to coat it more with JP Weagle. Just make sure to touch up any chips or scratches in the paint and it you ride in really wet conditions, pull the cranks and bottom bracket to drain out any water that may accumulate in the bottom bracket area.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72 View Post
    Transition already treats the inside of the tubes so there really is no need to coat it more with JP Weagle. Just make sure to touch up any chips or scratches in the paint and it you ride in really wet conditions, pull the cranks and bottom bracket to drain out any water that may accumulate in the bottom bracket area.
    yeah, i knew they did that, but I still just want to be on the safe side. after I pulled the seat post out when packing the bike for a trip, I noticed a rusty dust that was on the seatpost. Is that normal for a steel frame? This is my first one.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pike14 View Post
    yeah, i knew they did that, but I still just want to be on the safe side. after I pulled the seat post out when packing the bike for a trip, I noticed a rusty dust that was on the seatpost. Is that normal for a steel frame? This is my first one.
    Nope. That means water was getting down in there somehow. I recommend treating the seat tube with more framesaver, and then using grease or some kind of assembly paste on your seatpost to prevent water from getting into your seattube. I've always used grease with no problems.

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    dru
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtmartino View Post
    Nope. That means water was getting down in there somehow. .
    I beg to differ. I've owned/own 5 or 6 steel bikes and all of them end up with at least a bit of water in the frame after washing. Most every bike I've seen has a drain hole in the BB shell for this very reason. Generally after I wash the bikes I leave them upside down for a bit with the seat post out so the water drains. Also, if you look at almost any frame you'll see small vent holes in the chainstays and seatstays for welding or brazing. Water will find its way in there as well, as well as through the headset and botton bracket cartridges or bearings. Bikes aren't waterproof like submarines.

    I do agree with your solution though. Grease on the post and frame saver will lessen or eliminate water entry and possible damage.

    If the OP goes the linseed oil route, don't use too much. My Salsa leaked the stuff for about 6 months after, and it hardens like rock too. Makes getting it off the paint 'fun'.

    Drew
    occasional cyclist

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by dru View Post
    I beg to differ.
    I'm not sure how you wash your bike, but I've ridden the same steel frame for 5 years and it shows no internal rust. Only a nice healthy layer of Framesaver. A layer of rust may be normal to some people, but in most cases it's preventable.

    I sealed the vent holes on my frame with silicone. I also use a thick layer of grease on the seatpost. My bottom bracket is not water-permeable, and I installed it with anti-seize and teflon.

    My headset is the only area where water can enter with some difficulty, but I have a thick coating of framesaver all over the inside of the bike and I usually have a nice layer of grease in the head tube to protect it. I also sealed off the TT and DT from the HT with silicone and frame patches.

    I'm a clyde and ride a lightweight steel frame aggressively. I've had rusted frames before (that I bought used) and I'd rather do 30 minutes of prep work to protect the frame for life than to just let it rust away under me.

  10. #10
    dru
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    I didn't say my frames have rust in them, only that it's normal to find water in a frame. I agree the OP should obviously take some measure to drain or prevent the water that is sitting in the frame causing the rust.

    I'm generally pretty careful when washing the bike but always yank out the post just to be on the safe side.

    I'm just like you in not wanting my steel to rust away, but take different measures in protection.

    Drew
    occasional cyclist

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    dru and jtmartino:
    I already put some grease on the seatpose and in side the seat tube once I discovered the "rust dust". Now should I also get some frame saver in there as well? and if I do, should I remove the grease first, before applying the frame saver?
    Thanks for the help guys!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pike14 View Post
    yeah, i knew they did that, but I still just want to be on the safe side. after I pulled the seat post out when packing the bike for a trip, I noticed a rusty dust that was on the seatpost. Is that normal for a steel frame? This is my first one.
    I've owned steel frames for 30 year (counting back to my 10 speed and BMX days) which I've rode in all seasons living most of that time in the Pacific NW (WET!).

    Not one of my bikes has ever rusted out...unless your bike is exposed to salt water from living on the coast or riding in the winter on salt treated roads, your not going to have any issues. But if you feel you need more that JP Weagle is the best option.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72 View Post
    I've owned steel frames for 30 year (counting back to my 10 speed and BMX days) which I've rode in all seasons living most of that time in the Pacific NW (WET!).

    Not one of my bikes has ever rusted out...unless your bike is exposed to salt water from living on the coast or riding in the winter on salt treated roads, your not going to have any issues. But if you feel you need more that JP Weagle is the best option.
    Cool man. Thanks for the peace of mind! I'm not too concerned at this point because the frame isn't really all that old. I just wanna make sure it lasts because it's soooo sweet! Thanks for the respons!

  14. #14
    dru
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    Any time I take out the post I clean off the grease at least minimally. You'll get a fair bit of grit mixed in with the grease from the post and bike getting muddy. I'll shove a rag down the seat tube a bit, and lightly wipe off the post. I reapply a thin coat when I reinsert the post. That grit can scratch up a nice post pretty quick otherwise.

    As for linseed oil make sure you drain out the frame over newspapers. All those vent holes will leak the stuff out for at least a few days. Every few hours turn and rest the frame a different way so oil drains from the frame completely. For application, go to TSC stores and buy some small syringes to apply the linseed into the very small holes in the chainstays and seatstays. That syringe will also work well for dumping the oil into water bottle holes and the bigger vent holes found at the junctions of the HT, DT, TT and ST. Be very careful you toss your newspapers, paper towels, and rags in the garbage outside your house and garage. Linseed hardens by oxidation which generates some heat and risk of spontaneous combustion, however it won't light your frame on fire. As for your question, I wouldn't do more than wipe off any excess grease before beginning.

    Drew
    occasional cyclist

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72 View Post
    I've owned steel frames for 30 year (counting back to my 10 speed and BMX days) which I've rode in all seasons living most of that time in the Pacific NW (WET!).

    Not one of my bikes has ever rusted out...unless your bike is exposed to salt water from living on the coast or riding in the winter on salt treated roads, your not going to have any issues. But if you feel you need more that JP Weagle is the best option.
    Agree.The commuter I use every day is a thin walled Tange Prestige 92 Specialized Stumpjumper that sleeps outside and has rust allover...never done anything against it. No problem.
    "Blessed is the man who, having nothing to say, abstains from giving us wordly evidence of the fact." George Elliot

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    Yeah, the more I think about it the more comforted I am. I realized I have an old Trek Mountain Track that an ex girlfriend resurrected last summer as a commuter after it sad idle in my carport for close to 15 years not shielded from the elements. All original components and the bike still runs like a top!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by What&son View Post
    Agree.The commuter I use every day is a thin walled Tange Prestige 92 Specialized Stumpjumper that sleeps outside and has rust allover...never done anything against it. No problem.
    I broke a steel frame back in 2003 that was weakened due to rust. I didn't even know it was rusted until after the frame broke. Now I take care of my frames.

    Better to be safe than sorry, IMO. An hour's worth of labor and $10 worth of framesaver is worth preventing a broken frame and possibly an injury down the line.

  18. #18
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    If you can't find frame saver this stuff appears to be essentially the same, just takes a little longer to dry. I paid $7.50 for a 16 OZ can. Amsoil dealer locator will hook you up locally.AMSOIL - MP Heavy Duty Metal Protector (AMH)

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