Older riders choosing a full suspension bike- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    msp
    msp is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    1

    Older riders choosing a full suspension bike

    I'm looking at a new bike that will give a more plush (low back jolting) ride than my current Giant non-suspension MTB suitable for both bike tracks and a bit of XC - a general purpose bike for exercise and fun.

    I have a few friends in the same position - a bit older (50+), wanting to ride but minimise damage to our bodies and looking for advice on a bike.

    I've looked at the Giant and Cannondale range, briefly tried a Cannondale Rush (impressed) but would appreciate some advice. Cost is not as important as getting a good general purpose fully suspended bike.

    Any advice appreciated for an older generation wanting to keep active.

  2. #2
    Freshly Fujified
    Reputation: Call_me_Clyde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    8,199

    So many choices

    The Rush is definitely a nice bike. Given what you're describing, I would say something like the Rush or a similar All-Mountain offering would be a good choice. Unlike some of the XC race oriented bikes, AM bikes typically offer a more upright seating position. You won't feel as stretched out or hunched over the bars. To me, this makes for a more comfortable ride. You can get an even more upright position by using a riser bar and/or a stem with a greater rise to it.

    In any event, check out the offerings from the larger manufacturers like the Specialized Stumpjumper FSR, the Giant Trance or Reign, and the Trek Remedy or Fuel. If you are OK with buying direct from the manufacturer, try the Ibex Asta series bikes.

    I hope this helps.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  3. #3
    There's no app for this.
    Reputation: JimC.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,369

    what Clyde said and...

    just bought a Stumpy FSR comp, updated the drive train to SRAM X9 from Shimano and cranks from Truvativ to XT. After 2 days of hard riding at Whistler, and many years on many makes and models ( I went FS in '94, 12 years back), I can say this bike has no flies on it. Well except for the parts I changed, and the tires need to be upgraded, but then I'm picky as I'm old

    the good news is....there are very few bad bikes out there; my one bit of advice is to take your time and be sure it's right for you. If anything about it feels bad, move on and keep looking.

    Best of luck, Jim

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    12,083
    Rocky Mountain Element 30 should be on the list.

    As above you got to ride it and like it before you buy it.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: d365's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,028
    another vote for the Stumpy FSR. It is a very plush bike that climbs well, and is reasonably priced. The FSR design wont get stiff under pedaling or braking forces. Some other suspension designs will stiffen up under these forces, thus less plush ride. The only way to tell what feels right to you, is to test ride as many brands/designs as possible.

    Good Luck!

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    834
    Well questions like these usually brings out the *oldies but goodies* in this forum.

    I don't think you will need more than 4 inches suspension. Full suspension bicycles generally gets heavier as the rear suspension increases. They make them beefier to handle bigger jumps they were made for. XC type full suspensions such as Stumpjumper FSR, Trek Fuels, even Cannondale's Scapels would insulate the rider from trail bumps without being heavy. Many of these bikes have lock-outs for the rear shock which aids in efficient pedaling when going uphill or on paved bike paths.

    Back pain is sometimes caused by a rider's crunched position on the bike, although constant jarring contributes to this too. A high handlebar position will also help. The next size up (frame) will place the handlebar higher relative to the saddle.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.