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  1. #1
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    new bike vs parts

    For over a decade, I have owned one hardtail mountain bike at a time. (No FS for me.) The first was a used 26er with a rigid fork, to which I donated parts to the only complete bike I ever bought, which became a custom bike with only the original frame and hubs by the end of the year. After that, my bike has had several frames, forks, bars, cranks, etc. It's never the exact same bike for more than six months. Is it still the same bike after I replace ___? Yes, and no, at the same time. It's a paradox!

    My point is- there's a point in custom bike tinkering that you can't keep doing it without replacing a lot of parts, such that it seems to make more sense to just buy a new bike. I rarely break or wear out parts, just get bored with them and buy something new, one part at a time. I like the bike I have but I'd like to try something a little different. Getting a new bike or even a new frame would necessitate selling the old parts to help fund the new. With a relatively modest budget (no carbon or ti for my at the moment), I don't know if a new frame is worth the effort.

    Some things about my current bike that might make a new frame not worth the effort:

    • rims- currently on some nice WTB, 25mm ID tubeless rims. these are nice wheels that I built myself, still in great shape, but I'd like to try some tires wider than 29x2.3.
    • hubs- I can convert my Hadley 142 hub to a Boost axle or use generic spacers, which will be necessary with most modern frames, but it seems like a half-assed solution, especially if I can't take advantage of wider rims and all that.
    • fork- my tapered 120mm Reba is alright, but something stiffer might be nice. also, new hub or adapters if I wanted to go Boost.
    • internal dropper- I have a cheap externally routed dropper now, but something nicer and without the clunky external routing would be nice.
      frame- I would not mind something lighter with more modern geometry, but my riding style is still more XC on very rocky terrain. if I put gears on it, it's easily 30 pounds, even with light-ish aluminum rims


    I could buy a new frame at this point but I would also need a new seatpost, some way to adapt the hub(s) laced to "narrow" rims, maybe cranks since mine might no line up with a Boost drivetrain, etc. At what point to you cut your losses and start all over in order to keep up with technology, or just ride your "old" bike until it rots away under your feet?
    Last edited by mack_turtle; 11-18-2018 at 10:44 AM.

  2. #2
    since 4/10/2009
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    I think you said it fairly well early on, that you want something different.

    I think if you want to go substantially different, then you'll probably wind up with different wheels and fork, anyway.

    I'm building up a hardtail now that would be substantially different than what you're looking to update/replace. Guerrilla Gravity Pedalhead frame. I've basically tossed the budget for the build - lol - but if it costs more, then it'll just take longer for me to build. I have another bike that I'm not planning to get rid of, so being patient isn't really a problem aside from the fact that I have to stare at the awesome collection of parts until I can finish the build.

  3. #3
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    Boost in and of its self is useless. It won't improve your ride in any measurable way. If you "need" to go boost in order to get the frame/fork you want then so be it, but I wouldn't swap frames or wheels just to have boost.

    Slightly wider rims are worth while IMO. 27-30mm ID would be cool based on what I know of your riding. Then again we're only talking about a couple millimeters, I don't think your giving up much.

    I now have two Fox 34 forks and can confidently say I'll probably never own another 32mm stanchion fork. I'm also just over 200 lbs. (still have two Reba's in the parts bin)

    Internal droppers are cleaner, but functionally not really different. If you end up with a new frame most likely it will have internal routing anyway.

    All of these subjects are incremental improvements. Justifying such an investment is up to each individual based on needs, wants, budget, etc. I'd prioritize what you think your setup is lacking most and determine the best course of action.

    Side notes: When you say you may be interested in a lighter setup are you thinking an aluminum frame? (the new Ibis DV9 might be right up your alley, but you would need an EBB (it's BSA) or a tensioner for SS mode.)

    I honestly think the Surly frames are an incredible value for the money. I absolutely love both of mine and can tell you my Krampus frame is only a couple oz heavier than my custom frame, and a full pound lighter than my first cyclocross frame. I know you mentioned the KM as a possible candidate not too long ago. (to be fair I'm not at all weight conscious for certain bikes. My Krampus is over 30lbs in SS mode and I love it. I have another bike that is much lighter)
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  4. #4
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    Maybe it's time for a new frame and the build you want. Not sure how $ situation is, but hardtail design has never been better. Bigger rubber, better geometry, and a stiff fork with quality damping would be worth it to me.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  5. #5
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    I have been thinking of getting a Karate Monkey or a Timberjack for a while now. the TJ would be cheaper (comes with a headset too) and lighter and would just require the spacers from Salsa for my 142 hub to work. I like Surly stuff and all my past bikes have been steel, so a KM is definitely on the menu. The geometries are close enough that either could work for me and I would welcome the difference in HTA and chainstay length.

    I agree that slightly wider rims, internal dropper post routing, boost, etc would be only incremental changes. probably not worth getting a new frame just for those things, but a fancy new 27.5+ bike with wide rims and all that stuff would be very, very different. it's hard to find a way to actually test a bike like that on the trail, partially because it keeps raining every few days here lately, making the trails totally off-limits.

    actually, that is at least half the problem- I start thinking like this when I can't ride. most of the riders around here have barely gotten two rides in for the past two months due to rain.

    P.S. I have no interest in carbon fiber. maybe a CF handlebar or rigid seatpost, but that's where I draw the line. Titanium would be amazing, but I can't justify the cost at this point in my life.

    I can justify buying a big ticket item like a frame or fork or wheel once a year or so. I could justify buying a whole new bike if i meant I would not be buying any of those sort of items for a few years. I could not justify buying a whole custom bike all at once. my bike is never "good enough" for my personality, but it might be wise to rip off the bandage all at once and buy a complete bike that has all the stuff I think I want, rather than nickle-and-diming my way to a custom bike with lots of compromises on the way.
    Last edited by mack_turtle; 11-19-2018 at 07:00 AM.

  6. #6
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    Just buy a new bike.

    You've been around here long enough to know the reasons.

  7. #7
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    I appologize for all the nuerotic stuff I have posted here over the years. My issues are not bike-related and I am just seeing that now. It gets the best of me more and more and I need help that I can't get from the internet.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I appologize for all the nuerotic stuff I have posted here over the years. My issues are not bike-related and I am just seeing that now. It gets the best of me more and more and I need help that I can't get from the internet.
    Sorry to hear that. I suspect you're not alone in that regard!

    Besides, in the neurosis department, you are far from being the record holder!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I appologize for all the nuerotic stuff I have posted here over the years. My issues are not bike-related and I am just seeing that now. It gets the best of me more and more and I need help that I can't get from the internet.
    Mack, you're an old soul and well loved on these boards despite occasional curmudgeon leanings. We just want what's best for you.

    Things have changed so much during the past 5-6 years; I'm principally talking geo, boost, wheel/tire configurations & suspension design & execution improvements, some of which don't matter to you. But enough do that there's really only one way to get where you want to go...

    I'm with MSU Alum. Pick a good bike -- easy to do these days -- and swallow the pill.
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  10. #10
    Ride Fast Take Chances :)
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    Sometimes it's best to sell your old stuff and go with all new parts. They don't have to be high end, they just need to work.

    Stiffer forks are nice. highly recommended

    Wide wheels are great to a point. 30mm is the sweet spot for 2.35-2.6. 35 is too much and flattens the tread profile out more than I like.

    Boost hubs are slightly better. Not worth "upgrading" if you don't need to.

    How you operate a dropper doesn't matter. Stealth is cleaner and expands your options. Not a fan of shimming the wrong sized post to fit.

    It's almost always cheaper to build from the frame up. Things like cables and housing make a huge difference and complete bikes use crap. Same for brakes on cheap builds. A little extra money goes a long way to Xt brakes with your preferred size of rotor. touch points are another play we almost immediately upgrade. Stem length, bar width, seat, grips, tires, all these are very personal and you probably have a preference. The little changes add up fast. Best to get what you want the first time around.

    I like to build my own bikes too. There is a certain satisfaction from getting the cables the perfect length and setting up all the controls.

    Good Luck.
    Making shit harder than it needs to be isn't awesome, it's just...harder.

  11. #11
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexbn921 View Post
    It's almost always cheaper to build from the frame up.
    Cheaper? You sure that's not a typo.

    I'm on my 3rd full build (more, if you count the previous iterations my commuter bike took before I got it how I like it). cheaper is not a word you'll ever catch me saying in reference to those builds. I suppose if you use it in reference to long-term costs relative to changing out parts frequently, then I'll give you that. You just compress the costs up front, and you eliminate a bunch of intermediate costs.

    But that doesn't really work so well in cases where people change parts because they get bored with them.

  12. #12
    Ride Fast Take Chances :)
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    I made a spreadsheet for my Tallboy build. Normal retail on all the parts for an XX1 build was $1000 cheaper than a complete bike.
    The mid tier bikes was closer to 200-300 less expensive.
    Low end was a wash.
    If you figure that you are going to change grips, seat, cables/housing, tires and brakes on your new build with almost no return on used parts, then yes it is much cheaper.
    Making shit harder than it needs to be isn't awesome, it's just...harder.

  13. #13
    BOOM goes the dynamite!
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    I guess the real question OP needs to ask is if he buys a new bike and then follows his current pattern of "get bored and replace", will it save money? Or should he just buy a new frame since most of the parts will eventually get switched out anyway? I can't answer for OP, but I'm the latter which is why I don't see myself ever purchasing a complete bike.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    It gets the best of me more and more and I need help that I can't get from the internet.
    I don't know about that. I think my drunken postings are quite "helpful" to nearly everyone. ;-)
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  15. #15
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    Taking a bigger picture view, as I recall you're in Texas and ride rocky trails. It might be worth exploring a 27.5+ bike for your local terrain. Maybe you could wrangle one from a friend to try out.

    I generally feel that the bike you ride should fit your local terrain and riding style. A bike that works really well in Squamish BC, may not be best for Texas for example.

    Perhaps think about what details of your current bike could be changed to better suit your trails.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  16. #16
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    This is all a colossal waste of money and none of it can actually be justified either way.

    I think once you really start looking at it like that, decisions make more sense. I bought a new bike this year and pretty much upgraded the whole thing right off the bat. No spreadsheets. No cost evaluation. I bought the bike I wanted, then the parts I wanted.

    Either buy what you want, or what you can afford. I LOVE my new bike and I dont regret buying it. Its all new standards, new wheel size, new everything. I sold off everything I had before for a loss, but thats how it goes.

  17. #17
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    Neurotic post just for Mr. Mack_Turtle

    The basic question of this thread is one I constantly struggle with personally. I always want to try new things wether its geometry or components. I like to try new things, and I'm curious about bike stuff.

    I used to be of the mentality that I'm only investing in long term bikes I can keep for years. I still can't decide if that's the right course of action or not. I see both sides of the argument. More recently I'm determined to broadening my horizons and exploring more aspects of riding.

    Last year I built what I though was my dream Monster Cross bike, only to ride it 15 (?) times, decide I just never connected with the bike, and sell it for a loss. Followed that up with another frame up build on an old school road bike, cool project but did one test ride and didn't use it in the next 7 months. Currently for sale for another loss. It's too cool to sit unused, and I really hate riding on the road.

    I no longer have a budget for bike projects, it's a hobby. I want to try what I want to try. I don't have a big budget either so it may take some time, but for me the frame is the foundation and worth spending money on. It needs to have the geo I'm after. Wheels and tires are 2nd, especially the rear hub. Brakes and cranks are 3rd. Beyond that it may be aesthetics. I've paid a lot more recently to powder coat my frame and rims than I've paid for any drivetrain. And I'll happily do that again, why? Because it's fun, and apparently far more important to me than some POS 12 speed drivetrain which is recently spec'd on every entry level bike on Earth. (rant over)

    Mack, I say swap your frame if you're after different geo. Looking over your desired changes the frame is potentially the most significant. The Reba fork is great (assuming 15mm TA?). The rear hub is excellent. The dropper is all about the function and travel, not the cable routing. Lastly if your interested I have a couple rims I'll offer you for little more than the price of shipping. One Velocity Blunt 35, one Stans Arch MK3. Both lightly ridden and recently decommissioned because I needed the hub for something else.

    I'm still curious about the conversation Mr. Turtle. Where are you at with regards to new parts vs new bike?
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  18. #18
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    Mack, I'm like you, perfectly happy, but have more than one bike, but none "high end" and I regularly change setups "just because" to try out new parts or some such. I rode a Monkey for 10 years, used it for every kind of riding, from being a dedicated roadie when training hard, to commuter (it's original intent), to fun trail shredder to keep the skills sharp, running from 29x2.4" all the way to B+/29+ once I started riding it harder on rougher stuff.

    This year I decided it was time for a new rigid, something a bit bigger (XL was always a bit small for me) and slacker and was going to get the new Monkey, but not able to find the yellow/orange colour easily or at an e-tailer I use, I then happened upon the new Unit and liked what I saw, it was available on Jenson and so I grabbed one for a whopping $550 US and have been very happy ever since.

    I transferred over pretty much all the parts from the old Monkey, only thing I needed different was a seatpost and I already had a 31.6 Thomson sitting in my spare parts and headset, that's it. I'd suggest you do similar with yours from what you describe of yourself and then maybe get some new, wider rims capable of running true plus size (i35) and re-lace your wheels. Both the new Monkey and Unit are designed for 650B+, but can in fact run 29+ with good clearance, so very versatile frames, have run the Unit as B+ F&R, B+ R/29+F, 29+ F&R. I prefer the vertical sliding drop outs of the Unit over the horizontal slotted of the Monkey for ease of use and being replaceable, other than that, geo is very similar, except Unit has longer stays due to a straight seattube.

    New Unit running B+ rear/29+ front
    new bike vs parts-dcs_4797_fb.jpg

    Old Monkey B+ rear/29+ front, could not fit anything bigger than a B+ 2.8" in back.
    new bike vs parts-dsc_3908_fb.jpg
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  19. #19
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    If I were left to my own devices, I'd have two bikes and replace one of them each year. However, being married with kids and wanting to retire sooner rather than later, this really isn't in the cards for me. I tend to hold a bike for around 5 years, although my last one I kept for 8 years. I haven't really even had upgrade-itis with it, although in all honesty that is mostly because my riding has really dwindled the last few years.

    I popped on my friend's Hightower earlier this year and was amazed at how much bikes have changed. I can't speak from experience for hardtails, but with the FS bikes the suspension is more plush and more efficient and the the geometry just feels better to me. A short ride and I felt like it was time to get something new. Once I started looking, it became clear that standards have changed so much that it really didn't make sense to try moving parts over to a new frame - new front and rear hub standards and 1x drivetrains meant that swapping parts wasn't really an option. Throw in that I wanted a little more travel from my new bike, and I can't reuse the fork either.

    I don't know how relevant this is to hardtails. But for me, deciding I wanted a new FS frame pretty much meant getting a new bike. There might be something to say for starting fresh this year. But it also could be the case that you have your current bike so dialed-in the way that you want it, that it would be disappointing to go back to a stock build, and perhaps cost-prohibitive to get a new bike set up the way you want it. Only you can answer that.

    All I know is that I've got the itch to ride again. Can't say for sure that it is because of the new bike, but its nice to have it back. Whatever keeps you happy and out on the trails is the right answer for you.

  20. #20
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    I had to walk away from my usually incessant MTBR activity to think, but I can't leave ya hanging. thanks for the responses, it means a lot that someone listens to me complain. The response I deserve is "stop being an ungrateful little bitch and go ride your bike." god knows my personal friends don't get it and quickly become exasperated. a few things come to mind:

    1. I feel like a spoiled jerk and I am embarrassed to bring this topic up with anyone, so I appreciate the patience. first-world problems for certain. I have a nice bike that many people would love to own and would appreciate it more than I do. a lot of people around me own multiple bikes that are much nicer than mine, so there's a bit of bike envy there that bums me out for some reason. I am easily bummed out. this is a long-term pattern in my life. fortunately, this pattern is limited to bikes, and my wife of 14 years appreciates this.

    2. I get bored with stuff and depend too heavily on new bike stoke to keep motivated. I have allowed my interest in cycling more about the bike than the riding itself.

    3. I was looking at my finances the other day, and I am comfortably middle class for the first time in my adult life. still, for all those who say "just buy the bike you want," that does not fly in my life. truth be told, my wonderful, future-planning wife does not have any expensive hobbies, so she doesn't get it. she'd murder me if I bought the bike I really wanted, which might end up costing less than what many of you recently paid for a wheelset or a frame. I am at the point where my riding and knowledge of bikes does not match my budget, or so it seems for some reason.

    I can't remember where I saw this, but it's totally applicable:

    Name:  whatever bike.jpg
Views: 100
Size:  30.3 KB

    I nickle-and-dime my way into every purchase I make, so I never make a big-ticket purchase and everything is a compromise. I don't go into bike shops any more because they don't have anything I would actually buy on the budget I can imagine. maybe I can do that next year, finally. that's why I am thinking there's a sliver of a chance that I could replace my bike with something to revive the stoke.

    4. Texas weather sucks right now. not to make light of the tragedy in northern California right now, but I would gladly send some of this rain there if I could. the trails have been dry enough to ride all of three times in the past two months and each of those days had schedule conflicts.

    where does that leave me? I need to get out and just ride my damn bike. long-term, I might continue my pattern of replacing parts but maybe I can expand my budget so I can make fewer compromises. I might also try something new as I have been self-flagellating on a rigid singlespeed for years (the Reba is a part-time thing) so maybe it's time to stop being a martyr and ride with gears and a squish fork and fat tires. if I want to go that route, I might go for delayed gratification and wait for a new bike.

    specific parts:
    1. my Reba fork has a 100x15 thru axle, which is fine. I have enough spare parts to rebuild it half a dozen times. however, at 120mm of travel, it's quite noodily. nice, stiff forks (I would probably go with a Pike or something similar) are quite pricey, so again, $$$.
    2. my "narrow" rims might offer more fun if they were with big ol tires. I built these wheels myself, so I could rebuild them with wider rims if I wanted. not looking forward to the hassle of buying new spokes and I hate ending up with perfectly good rims because no one wants un-laced rims except for the few people like me who build wheels.
    3. the Jabberwocky is actually probably just fine. it could be lighter, the front end is probably spot-on for my size (maybe just a tad long for my preferences). the only thing that would truly make me happy is a custom frame, but that's $$$ I can't justify spending.
    4. dropper- I bought the Brand X dropper from Chain Reaction. it works, but it weighs a ton. I used it a few times and put my trusty Thomson rigid post back on.

    I try not to get too caught up in bike weight, but if I put gears, a suspension fork, and that dropper on my bike, plus fatter tires, my XC hardtail easily weighs over 30 pounds. total overkill for my riding style and 160-pound self. I know people are accepting heavier bikes these days, bit what's reasonable for a xc/ light trail oriented hardtail these days?

  21. #21
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    So many things you say resonate with me...

    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I get bored with stuff and depend too heavily on new bike stoke to keep motivated. I have allowed my interest in cycling more about the bike than the riding itself.
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    ...my wonderful, future-planning wife does not have any expensive hobbies...
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I need to get out and just ride my damn bike..
    No easy solutions. I guess an interesting question is: if you didn't buy bike parts routinely, would you be able to upgrade to a better bike? And, if so, which would make you happier?

    My wife sounds like yours - she barely ever asks for anything even remotely expensive for Christmas. Although, I will never forget the year that she asked for a new couch for the family room that ended up in remodeling the entire ground floor of our house. My bikes never resulted in re-financing our house. But I diverge...

    I am fortunate and got to scratch my new bike itch. I am squarely in the 'need to get out and ride my damn bike' category. Good luck to you!

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by SqueakyWheel73 View Post
    I guess an interesting question is: if you didn't buy bike parts routinely, would you be able to upgrade to a better bike? And, if so, which would make you happier?
    This is a good point. When I rode less expensive stuff, durability was kinda low and I HAD to buy new parts more often because stuff wore out quicker. And yeah, I did get bored with the bike more easily. SLX/XT level or better knocked back the urge to replace stuff all the time out of boredom for me, at least. I still replace things, and buy parts for existing bikes, but that's for replacing worn or broken stuff. Recently did my chain and bb. Will be rebuilding my pedals this weekend. That sort of stuff. The bike always feels fresher after maintaining it, so that's nice.

    I haven't changed any major parts on my commuter for a couple of years now, even.

    The bike I'm building now really has no budget for the complete build. Budget just dictates how soon I'm able to put it together and ride it. At this point, my wife tells me straight that she doesn't want to know the total cost for the bike. Yes, doing it this way requires patience and self control. Every time a new part comes in, it makes me want to ride it, which makes me want to buy all the parts to finish the build. But I'd rather do it this way, than to cheap out and buy whatever I can to get it assembled as soon as possible. I'll balance the cost somewhat by keeping it for quite awhile.

    I grew up lower middle class and simply didn't have much as a kid. I am financially better off now than I was then, and at first I did buy things with more frequency because I "could" but didn't get much satisfaction from it. I found that I prefer buying fewer, nicer things, especially things that enable experiences. I grew up around people that kept all kinds of crap. Not quite to the level of hoarders, but it could have gotten there relatively easy. Owning "more" was the status symbol. I've gone the other direction. I have a tendency now to get rid of stuff regularly to simplify and declutter. Sometimes that helps me buy nicer bike parts.

  23. #23
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    It's reassuring to hear that I am not alone in my inability to pull thousands of dollars out of my butt whenever I feel like it.

    Quote Originally Posted by SqueakyWheel73 View Post
    if you didn't buy bike parts routinely, would you be able to upgrade to a better bike? And, if so, which would make you happier?
    No, and I can't know that. Probably not!

    I can justify the new parts from time to time. My fear is that buying a new bike would absolutely necessitate selling the old one. That's a risk that I might regret taking.

    I'll have to find someone who has a modern B+ hardtail or something like a Stache that I can really try out on trails to get an idea. Demos are few and far between and rarely have bikes like that.

  24. #24
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    I'd really like to upgrade my wheelset to something lighter and wider, but it won't fly with wife at this time. I understand how that goes.

    Whenever weather or life stuff gets in the way of getting out riding, I start thinking more and more about the bike itself and what I can upgrade versus riding trails.

    I have been thinking about spending more on riding trips than bike stuff lately.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  25. #25
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    Holy crap man, what are you talking about, my rigid 29+ Unit weighs in around 33lbs fully kitted with saddle bag with spare tube, multi tool and frame pump attached (30.5lbs without anything on), it is what it is, I really don't care, rides FANTASTIC. Would a lighter setup be nice? Hell yeah, but I'm not willing to spend the $$ to make that happen, let's me own several bikes and I know that everything on it is robust and won't fail me. It isn't even what I'd consider a lower end build either, everything's XT, wheels are similar build level.

    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    .... I try not to get too caught up in bike weight, but if I put gears, a suspension fork, and that dropper on my bike, plus fatter tires, my XC hardtail easily weighs over 30 pounds. total overkill for my riding style and 160-pound self. I know people are accepting heavier bikes these days, bit what's reasonable for a xc/ light trail oriented hardtail these days?
    Yeah, know the feeling all to well after being off the bike for the last 4 or so weeks with a badly injured thumb and ontop of that, lots of depressing rain.

    Quote Originally Posted by Curveball View Post
    I'd really like to upgrade my wheelset to something lighter and wider, but it won't fly with wife at this time. I understand how that goes.
    Whenever weather or life stuff gets in the way of getting out riding, I start thinking more and more about the bike itself and what I can upgrade versus riding trails.
    I have been thinking about spending more on riding trips than bike stuff lately.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  26. #26
    Out spokin'
    Reputation: Sparticus's Avatar
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    Within this thread I'm seeing a common theme that appears to keep many riders from owning the bike(s) they want: wives.
    It's wonderful to have a dream bike(s) plus plenty of time to ride it/them.
    Having a sweet girlfriend at the same time is likewise awesome.
    I better not screw this up.
    =sParty

    P.S. If I buy her a ring, it'll probably be a Wolf Tooth.
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Curveball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    Within this thread I'm seeing a common theme that appears to keep many riders from owning the bike(s) they want: wives.
    Don't get me wrong, I qualified my statement to note "at this time". We just dumped a bunch of money into a new bed and trailer repairs. The new wheels will wait until our finances allow it.

    My wife is quite wonderful and I do have a dream bike that I love. She generally supports my riding and joins my son and I if we aren't going someplace too difficult for her.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  28. #28
    Anytime. Anywhere.
    Reputation: Travis Bickle's Avatar
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    Not worth having a new bike if you have responsibilities and have to go short on other important things. I'm lucky, retired and have a PT job at LBS that has covered an extravagant bike year.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
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    conclusions after today:

    1. I love being a curmudgeon and I will continue to be one. get off my lawn.

    2. I need to make compromises where it makes sense. The rigid bike thing is getting old. I am not racing but I have nothing to prove. I put my suspension fork back on my bike, along with the dropper post. then it started raining again.

    3. I love tinkering with my bike--a little too much. buying parts to make a slightly different bike is fun. Building wheels and servicing my own fork saves a little money if not done to excess. I just need to keep the urge to tinker in check as soon as it gets in the way of enjoying riding my bike.

    4. my bike is not heavy. singlespeed with that "heavy" dropper post and a 120mm Reba it's still under 27 pounds. if I put a derailleur on it, it would still be easily well under 30. I should not have weighed it, but I did.

    all that is to say that I would not benefit from a whole new bike. now that I know what I am looking for in a frame, I'll look around for a different frame some time in the next few months and not sweat it in the meantime. since I know what I want, I can probably justify expanding my budget a bit as well. for now, it's back to the frame market!

    If anyone has any ideas, here' what I am looking for in a hardtail:
    • singlespeed adjustable dropouts or EBB or something
    • steel preferred. aluminum could work. ti if I could afford it. no crabon!
    • moderate reach and ETT. for example, the Honzo is too long and the Chumba Stella is too short for my liking.
    • short chainstays. I rigged up a way to shorten the chainstays on my Jabber from 17" to 16.5" (don't ask!) and it feels divine! but now I can't fit rubber bigger than a 29x2.3 in there or it rubs on the seat tube.
    • relatively high BB so I can bunnyhop over tall buildings with a single bound.
    • 142mm axle would be nice, but I'll deal with some sort of boost adapter if I need to.
    • modern but not "enduro bro" nonsense. I am riding naturally technical trails that have never seen a machine.


    a new Karate Monkey or Timberjack come to mind. I might expand my budget a bit if something similar by more svelte is available. a Nimble 9 sounds intriguing but they are always out of stock.

    The truth is... Have you every heard of the Marshmallow Experiment? Look that up. I am the kid who would eat the marshmallow before the researcher finishes relaying the instructions. My wife is the kid who would hoard all of the marshmallows and not even think about eating any of the. Why imbibe in something when you can just hoard it?
    Last edited by mack_turtle; 11-29-2018 at 12:16 PM.

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