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  1. #1
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    new beginner all mountain or XC bike

    Need some recommendation on a good all mountain or XC bike for beginner. Looking for great deals and best bang for the buck, but won't break the piggy bank. I am open to used bike too but not sure if it is reliable?

  2. #2
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    Used bikes come in all kinds of condition and price range. What is your budget? There's a lot of great deal out there for different budget as long as you are realistic. What kind of riding do you do and planing to do.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeHu View Post
    Need some recommendation on a good all mountain or XC bike for beginner. Looking for great deals and best bang for the buck, but won't break the piggy bank. I am open to used bike too but not sure if it is reliable?
    Such a big open ended question

    I'd personally be shooting for something like a Giant Trance X or similar. Giant, while as common as they come, are great value for money and you can get a nice entry level dually relatively cheaply.

    It might even be worthwhile shooting for a second hand hard tail just to get your skills up, and ride it into the ground while you are researching your new bike. And then when you know you are going to stick with the sport and you have a better idea of what you want you can spend a bit more and get something that will last you longer!

    Hope that helps!
    Ryano.

  4. #4
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    Sorry, to thread jack but I am in a similar situation. I just rode a serious trail for the first time yesterday borrowing my brother's bike that is not really meant for serious uphill. I am looking at used bikes, but what are the main things I want to look for in a bike. I really want something that will be easy for climbing and can handle the bumps of a quick downhill

  5. #5
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    for someone starting out ... would recommend a hard tail with a 100mm fork.

    used bike is fine when you know what you are looking for and it is one of those things that you will not know about till you have your bike with you and you can dismantle the components, clean them and build the bike up again.

    so what bike you might ask? it all depends on your budget.

    i started out with a GT avalanche disc. after 1 year, i have replaced almost all the components. the frame was the last component to go. since then i have built myself a HT and FS.

    just start with a trek or specialized. there always good deals around like last year's models. stick with it for sometime and if you like the sport, after awhile you will know what are the good components and you can build yourself a bike from there.

    good luck

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by chinaman View Post

    i started out with a GT avalanche disc. after 1 year, i have replaced almost all the components. the frame was the last component to go.
    I had a mate with one of these and he rode it for about a year and a half flat out while the rest of us were on dually's. It was a bit worse for wear in the end but stood up to all of the punishment.

    My first bike was an Avanti Montari - cost me about $300 AU second hand and it was a great bike.

  7. #7
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    The GT was a good frame for me to start out with ...

    After awhile, depending on how you like your toys, you might just continue with it or if you're like me, who prefers to customise, you break it down and start from there ...

    If you start out with a good and reliable frame, after some useful riding, you will know what you want in terms of the geometry that you would like, and then you can start your components list and then the fun begins

    Very much like football boots, they all very much do what it says on the tin. But after awhile if you are still in the game you may wish to go for those with the '3 stripes' or the little 'swoosh' or whatever you may fancy which is not dependant on the performance but much rather how it pleases your eye.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by chinaman View Post
    for someone starting out ... would recommend a hard tail with a 100mm fork.

    used bike is fine when you know what you are looking for and it is one of those things that you will not know about till you have your bike with you and you can dismantle the components, clean them and build the bike up again.

    so what bike you might ask? it all depends on your budget.

    i started out with a GT avalanche disc. after 1 year, i have replaced almost all the components. the frame was the last component to go. since then i have built myself a HT and FS.

    just start with a trek or specialized. there always good deals around like last year's models. stick with it for sometime and if you like the sport, after awhile you will know what are the good components and you can build yourself a bike from there.

    good luck
    there is a specialized rockhopper for 200 bucks on craigslist, what about something like that?

    What is the advantage of a hardtail for a beginner?

  9. #9
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    The "advantage" is that a full suspension can make up for some rider errors, whereas a hard tail is going to be alot less forgiving.
    2010 Giant Yukon FX
    Pure XCR Wheelset/Geax Saguaro Tires/Tubeless
    Bike Weight Lost: 2.48lbs (1124g)

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperSlow35th View Post
    The "advantage" is that a full suspension can make up for some rider errors, whereas a hard tail is going to be alot less forgiving.
    +1 ... on a HT, you learn to choose your line and control your speed and you generally pick up a lot of off-road handling skills mainly because you tend not to ride 'straight through' areas that you will do on a FS.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by chinaman View Post
    +1 ... on a HT, you learn to choose your line and control your speed and you generally pick up a lot of off-road handling skills mainly because you tend not to ride 'straight through' areas that you will do on a FS.
    taking that into consideration, and without knowing much about my riding, is the 200 dollar rock hopper a decent deal?

  12. #12
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    A little more info is needed. What year is it? Disc? V Brake? Which front fork? A new hardrock is in the $450-ish range.
    2010 Giant Yukon FX
    Pure XCR Wheelset/Geax Saguaro Tires/Tubeless
    Bike Weight Lost: 2.48lbs (1124g)

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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperSlow35th View Post
    A little more info is needed. What year is it? Disc? V Brake? Which front fork? A new hardrock is in the $450-ish range.
    I honestly don't know much about it. The craigslist details are:

    Specialized Rock Hopper
    21 speed
    26 inch alum wheels
    front suspension
    digital speed/comp

    Not sure on the year. I was trying to post a link to craigslist so you could see a pic but my post count is below 10.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by waterskier2007 View Post
    I honestly don't know much about it. The craigslist details are:

    Specialized Rock Hopper
    21 speed
    26 inch alum wheels
    front suspension
    digital speed/comp

    Not sure on the year. I was trying to post a link to craigslist so you could see a pic but my post count is below 10.
    It doesn't matter how good the deal you get is if the bike doesn't fit you. Do you know what size bike you ride? Do you know what size that bike is? I'd really go pay a visit to your local bike shop and test ride some bikes. At least at that point you'll have a good basis on what an entry level bike might feel like and they'll be able to fit you on a few different sizes so you can compare.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  15. #15
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    Take a tape measure with you. The sales person will know what is the size of the bike usually measured in the seattube length from the bottom bracket. (length of A from photograph; could be 16", 17", 18" etc)

    new beginner all mountain or XC bike-20110923-yeti-arc-08-10-geometry-mtbr-forum.jpg

    Try out a few bikes. Then once you know which one fits you comfortably, measure the length of B (needs to be parallel to the ground), and note of the length of the stem.

    Mainly because there are lots of frames out there with the same seatube length but different effective top tube length (B) which can be compensated by the stem length.

    I many have provided you with too much info, in which case, you go with the seattube length and after you have had your bike for a while and when it is time to upgrade in a year or so ... you will have gained the additional info.

  16. #16
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    One can get a taste of trail worthiness for $450 new, but long term durability starts around $800-$1000 (double-wall rims, disc brakes, a well-sealed suspension fork). Used, you would be looking at half that, provided you were confident that the parts aren't worn out. A good bike shop might help you assess wear-and-tear, as well as fit (important).

  17. #17
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    I'll give you my experience. I bought a Trek Fuel EX 5 two seasons ago and was stoked to have my first full suspension mountain bike. It was a blast at first. But my buddies leave me in the dust on long climbs with their 29ers. I found out I'm not really interested in bombing down hills, I mainly like to climb, and the rear wheel slips out on steep climbs when standing and when I'm seated it wheelies off the trail. I'm now upgrading to a 29er that will climb better. You can't predict what type of rider you'll be. If I wanted one bike to do it all this would have been a great choice. But I'm not really into shuttling up hills and bombing down, much rather neander through miles of singletrack. That's my story.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chinaman
    for someone starting out ... would recommend a hard tail with a 100mm fork.
    Agreed, but not an XC bike, rather a DJ/FR/HT bike like a Giant STP with a Marzocchi DJ fork wider rim and 20mm axle. Can suck up everything you can dish out.

    If you like the style, but think it's too heavy you could go XC or move to FS FR, or FS AM.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Boz View Post
    I'll give you my experience. I bought a Trek Fuel EX 5 two seasons ago and was stoked to have my first full suspension mountain bike. It was a blast at first. But my buddies leave me in the dust on long climbs with their 29ers. I found out I'm not really interested in bombing down hills, I mainly like to climb, and the rear wheel slips out on steep climbs when standing and when I'm seated it wheelies off the trail. I'm now upgrading to a 29er that will climb better. You can't predict what type of rider you'll be. If I wanted one bike to do it all this would have been a great choice. But I'm not really into shuttling up hills and bombing down, much rather neander through miles of singletrack. That's my story.

    While I like how your point about how you can't predict what type of rider you'd be but at the end of the day 3 fact you pointed out your buddies beat you on the climb, your rear wheel slips and front wheel wheelie is the rider's control not the bike.

    If/when you are beating your buddies on the bombing descend you'll be singing different tune. I used to sweep when we go on a group ride they smoked me down the descend, after a few bike clinic/practice and adjustable seat post I'm pushing the pace of the fast riders up front

  20. #20
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    Try looking on eBay. There is a huge used bike market and the experienced sellers have to be honest about the condition.

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    I would say go with full suspension as the prices have come way down, it will be more comfortable and get you "up to speed" faster on skills and fun. I would not look for an "all mountain" or race bike as you will want something that cuts right down the middle for good climbing, descents, etc...
    Giant, Specialized and Trek all give good values and if you look on ebay, you can pick up a bike with very little use for 60% of the new price.

    Beyond that, test ride many different bikes as the comfort and fit are going to be the biggest influence on you enjoyment and desire to ride. At similar price points, many manufactures use comparable parts, so think in terms of a frame that feels good to you and find a price point where you are getting parts that will serve you for a long time. Spend as much as you can justify once you find a frame that feels good. A major MTB magazine said the sweet spot for dual sus trail bikes in 2011 was around $3400 +/- 10%. That sounds like a lot, but gets you a great bike without paying for boutique parts or paying too much for minimal weight reduction.
    I say try to spend about $800-$1200 on a gently used big name all purpose bike that sold for $2000+ a couple years ago. It will serve you for years and your skills won't outgrow it anytime soon.

  22. #22
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    one way to look at it is to buy a much older bike that was $800 or $1000 when it was new for a couple hundred bucks and find out if you even like mountain biking.
    Ride for a few weeks and spend the time looking for the best bike you can. I quit riding for 10 years, then recently found a 14 year old bike to get into it again. I am really enjoying it. It cost $200 works great and I can ride on it for a year while I get in shape. If I dont break my legs, I will be able save for a great bike and know what I want from it.

    I remember starting off and having no idea what I would want from a bike or how to ride off road. I would have regretted spending money on the wrong kind of bike.

    Stick with high end brands, check the bike for wear and tear.

  23. #23
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    Used high-end bike>new cheapo bike IMO

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    you got lots of responses. no one yet knows where you live which might give an idea of the types of trails available, how big you are, what your biking experience has been, your budget, etc.

    You did get a lot of conflicting info though, some good and some absurd. best to address the above points before taking any advice to heart. Regardless of the type of bike, fit is everything. Your budget and type of riding will dictate most of your bike choice.

    If you are brand new to the scene, the cheaper bikes will be better if you end up not liking the sport, end up not riding much or decide that you prefer one extreme end of the mtn biking spectrum, ie: XC vs more gravity oriented. You could save up for your next bike as you'll know what you really want.

  25. #25
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    Attention ! This is to advise everyone looking for a frame or complete bike: there is a site called Otomacycle that comes up when looking for Cube, Beone or Rocky Mountain frames. Do not buy from these crooks. The site is a complete fraud, they are disguised as a legit bike store but the only purpuse is theft. I have ordered and payed for a Beone carbon frame and never heard from them again. Since I don't have enough posts I am not allowed to open new threads, so perhaps a moderator could do a banner or a sticky with this announcement to keep people out of trouble.

  26. #26
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    There is a lot of bike's that you'll not going to pay to much..when i was in philippines i buy some bike like $300 or like 10 thousand pesos in their money..Is not quite expensive but it is really good to use..you can go to global sources.com you can see a lot of bike they sell..and it is up to you what will you choose..

  27. #27
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    Here is what I have narrowed it down for me: b/w Cannondale Quick CX3 vs Specialized Crosstrail Sport Disk vs Disk

    Please help me decide b/w the following. I was first going for the cheaper $579 Crosstrail disk, but the LBS person suggested looking at the ones with the suspension lock out. I'm trying to keep my budget reasonable. I'll be more of a Sunday rider with my son who I bought the Specialized Hotrock 24 21-speed bike

    I'm trying to find the best bang for buck b/w the following 3... the LBS rep suggested looking at hydraulic disks too but I think staying with regular disk brakes may be plenty for me. I'm trying to figure out at this price point, is there a major difference b/w cannondale vs specialized specs/quality and what I'll be getting for my $

    Cannondale Quick CX3 $799

    Specialized Crosstrail Sport Disk $749

    Specialized Crosstrail Disk $579

    Thanks in advance

  28. #28
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    Psych, aren't those cross bikes? If so, not a clue as I would pretzel any of those.

  29. #29
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    i am also a newbe and got a giant talon 2, great starter bike

  30. #30
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    but i did upgrade the fork to a reba race u turn...

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