Most comfortable saddle???- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Most comfortable saddle???

    I know saddles are truly personal preference but Im looking for a comfortable saddle thats forgiving as well as sturdy. I weigh around 210 and currently have a wtb Speed-V. I get pretty sore from long rides with a lot of saddle time.

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    As you said, saddles are very much a personal preference. I do have one piece of advice. If you spend a lot of time in the saddle, a heavily padded saddle like the Speed V is not ideal. The reason is that you need to be supported by your sit bones. Heavily padded saddles let your sit bones sink in the saddle and then all your weight is supported by soft tissues. Heavily padded saddles are great for recreational riders who don't spend much time in the saddle, but for enthusiast riders who spend greater time in the saddle less padding is needed. WTB makes a lot of great saddles, my favorite WTB is the Silverado, the Rocket V is also nice. I know some places like Hudson Trail Outfitters have test saddles, you might want to check in to that to find one you like.
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  3. #3
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    Sometime it is just a matter of getting our bottom end slowly adapted to sitting on a bicycle seat. At the beginning of bicycling season I have to keep my rides around 15-30 minutes. Once my rear gets used to riding again (5 or 6 rides) I can go longer.

  4. #4
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    We all have sit bones, and they're all in the same place. For a saddle to feel comfortable, it needs to support your sit bones. I dont believe that saddles are as personal as people make it out to be.

    When I was over 200lb, my speed v's would flex enough to not support my sit bones. It would just cause pressure points and pretty bad pain. Everyone needs a firm enough, stiff enough saddle to support them. You need to step up to a firmer more supportive saddle. Something like a silverado or laser. Id check out the charge spoon too, its far better than its price suggests.

  5. #5
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    I originally bought my speed-V cuz it matched all the little red bits on my bike. Silly I know. I shouldve listened when the clerk at the lbs "jokingly" asked if I was planning on ever sitting down. Lol. It was ok at first but as of lately its just not cutting it. Def noticing the flexing more since the saddle has racked up some miles. Im gonna check out the silverado and laser. Never heard of the Charge Spoon but thats on my list now to. Thanks!

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    What about SDG and Ergon saddles? I also hear the "Big S" makes excellent saddles also...

  7. #7
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    Spec makes really good saddles. They do a whole butt fit thing to match you to saddles, but every spec bike ive sat on felt pretty good as-is.

    Lots of guys love the charge spoon. They could really charge 3 times as much and it would still be a good saddle. Its well made, firm, and supportive. Its so cheap its worth trying it blind. Its light too. Ive been on one a couple years now and im sold.

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    Selle Italia Max Flite Gel flow.. rails are setup such that you have a sort of polymer suspension, and the padding is awesome. I use one on all my bikes.

  9. #9
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    Check out
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    Try on some of the Chromag's. I got their Trailmaster LTD leather version and it's been my favorite for over 2 yrs.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    We all have sit bones, and they're all in the same place. For a saddle to feel comfortable, it needs to support your sit bones. I dont believe that saddles are as personal as people make it out to be.

    When I was over 200lb, my speed v's would flex enough to not support my sit bones. It would just cause pressure points and pretty bad pain. Everyone needs a firm enough, stiff enough saddle to support them. You need to step up to a firmer more supportive saddle. Something like a silverado or laser. Id check out the charge spoon too, its far better than its price suggests.
    Gotta agree with that. Want to put down some miles, start with a solid foundation to sit on.

    I recently swapped out a Rocket V for a Prologo X8, temporarily at first, just because the Rocket V's seams were splitting to the point where gorilla tape wasn't even working anymore. Turns out I absolutely LOVE it, despite how uncomfortable it looks in comparison to the Rocket V.

    Still have an original Flite on my road bike, and it's still awesome.

    Don't be afraid of the minimalist saddles.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by CyclesnIPAs View Post
    I know saddles are truly personal preference but Im looking for a comfortable saddle thats forgiving as well as sturdy. I weigh around 210 and currently have a wtb Speed-V. I get pretty sore from long rides with a lot of saddle time.
    A good seat only goes so far for comfort. Sometimes you need to adjust the fork setting and rear shock (if you have one) to be a bit more plush. I also never ride without my gel padded cycling baggy shorts. It makes a huge difference.

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    Ive heard good things about TERRY brand. I waiting for mine to come in. My brother has the same one i ordered and is very happy. The Liberator Y.
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  14. #14
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    Im liking the look and price of the Charge Spoon. Def worth the gamble. If I hate it I didnt spend a ton on a saddle that will end up hanging on my shop wall Lol. Some of these saddles are pretty pricey and look a tad intimidating they look more like torture than comfort. Looks can be deceiving apparently. Correct me if Im wrong, Aren't Terry Brand Saddles women specific???

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    I use Trico gel padded shorts, and I find that the padding seems to negate
    the perineal/center-cutout-relief offered by most good saddles...

    I currently ride a Selle Respiro Moderate (which I think would be more comfortable
    if i wasn't wearing these dam padded shorts when riding)

    I previously rode a Selle TRK Women's saddle
    (bought a women's because it was, y'know, 'wider,'
    and I thought that would be better even though I'm a dude...
    haven't had too many comfortable rides on it (do tell)...
    plus I've heard the TRK takes some tweaking to set comfortably...

    Will definitely be checking out the Charge Spoon, based on the reports so far,
    and the unbeatable price (and may have a Selle TRK women's saddle for sale soon).

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by CyclesnIPAs View Post
    Im liking the look and price of the Charge Spoon. Def worth the gamble. If I hate it I didnt spend a ton on a saddle that will end up hanging on my shop wall Lol. Some of these saddles are pretty pricey and look a tad intimidating they look more like torture than comfort. Looks can be deceiving apparently. Correct me if Im wrong, Aren't Terry Brand Saddles women specific???
    Terry did indeed start with women specific saddles, but their great success pushed them to do mens saddles as well. They have a full line of mens saddles. Check their site. I got a leather covered saddle,the Liberator Y

    http://www.terrybicycles.com/Saddles/Mens-Saddles
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by blundar View Post
    A good seat only goes so far for comfort. Sometimes you need to adjust the fork setting and rear shock (if you have one) to be a bit more plush. I also never ride without my gel padded cycling baggy shorts. It makes a huge difference.
    Another thing that is often overlooked is the tire size and tire pressures that you are running for your weight. You said that you are at 210 Lb. Generally speaking with a 2.1" 29er tire or a 2.3" 26er tire you should be at around 28 psi for your tires. Any more than that and your ride will be too harsh. Less that that and you will start to get pinch flats.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by blundar View Post
    Another thing that is often overlooked is the tire size and tire pressures that you are running for your weight. You said that you are at 210 Lb. Generally speaking with a 2.1" 29er tire or a 2.3" 26er tire you should be at around 28 psi for your tires. Any more than that and your ride will be too harsh. Less that that and you will start to get pinch flats.
    My main issue with my current saddle isnt so much when I ride off road. I rarely sit while navigating through the tight twisty trails I normally ride. My main riding buddy injured his back and cannot ride off road so we have been doing A LOT of road and light path riding. Due to this I am sitting way more than normal and running higher tire pressure. This is when I noticed how horribly uncomfortable the Speed-V actually is. Either way I do want a better more supportive saddle. Went shopping today...man these things get pricey! I looked at a Bontrager Paradigm Race for $99. Anyone ride one of these???

  19. #19
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    Spec saddles are my fav

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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Spec saddles are my fav
    What model saddle do u use? And upon doing some research the Bontrager Paradigm Race appears to be a road saddle...I know some saddles are both but im not sure that is the case with this one. I liked the looks of it though...

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    I dont believe that saddles are as personal as people make it out to be.
    I disagree. If saddles weren't personal then weight wouldn't be a factor... nor would sit bone width, bike fit, riding style, pedaling style... even things like hamstring flexibility.

    I have effective leg length differences so my hips aren't square, I tend shuffle around, move fore/aft, pedal with body english up tech, as well as get out of the saddle and grind frequently. I also tend to climb folded forward w/ steep ST angle so I need a narrower support platform.

    This all adds up to having specific needs. Ergon SME3 small works well for me. Flat saddle with no "hammock", v shaped with narrow hips...

  22. #22
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    Pure-V is more comfortable than Speed-V. Padded shorts are also a must for those really long rides. I would also drop the psi on your tires a bit. The higher psi does not help much at all with efficiency. The tread pattern on the tires makes much more of a difference.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by blundar View Post
    Pure-V is more comfortable than Speed-V. Padded shorts are also a must for those really long rides. I would also drop the psi on your tires a bit. The higher psi does not help much at all with efficiency. The tread pattern on the tires makes much more of a difference.
    I NEVER ride without my padded shorts regardless of where Im riding. My favorite currently are Canari baggies with a gel padding. Super comfy. I honestly dont know what psi I run on the pavement prob around 36psi? Trying to ride at my usual 27-28 psi on the pavement made my bike feel slow and somewhat unwieldy. I have also changed my tires since my last road ride. Now running a 2.20 instead of 2.1. They add plenty of extra cushion I didnt have previously so that should help. Looking to have a new saddle by this weekend hopefully.

  24. #24
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    There's some bad advice in this thread. You're probably best served finding a saddle that works really well for you as much of a pain in the a$$ as it may be...

  25. #25
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    SDG are on every bike build.
    count your blessings

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by wizzer16 View Post
    SDG are on every bike build.
    What model SDG??? I appreciate brand suggestions but models would be ideal also.

  28. #28
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    Sit bones are not the same for everyone. I tried a WTB Silverado but my sit bones were slipping over the outer edges causing pain. I switched to a WTB Devo and all is well. Yes, just 10 or so millimeters in width can make a difference. I measured my sit bones after the fact and indeed I needed a medium (~140-145mm) width saddle.

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    I converted to the SQlab saddles... They have more of a step-down design than a cutout... Took a few tries to setup right, but once dialed, everything levitates while the sit bones do their thing...

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    I pulled the trigger on a black Charge Spoon. On sale from Jensonusa for $26.99! I hope I like it as much as everyone else! Thanks for all the recommendations folks!

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    Had my maiden voyage on the Charge Spoon today. This thing lives up to the hype! Awesome saddle! Very comfortable right off the bat. I could actually feel it supporting my weight unlike my Speed-V. Turns out my Speed-V had a bent rail and was tweaked. That probably didnt help in the comfort department. Today was a short ride. We'll see how the Spoon holds up on longer rides. If its as good as it seems im not worried.

  32. #32
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    I tried a lot of styles and many gimmicks, I am still searching for the perfect saddle but I've had the best luck with old school leather Brooks and the B67 and B72. They support the sit bones and break in around them but the spring underneath helps, a little heavy but worth it if comfort it the goal. You can lose the springs to lighten up with a B17. I might try the Charge Spoon too, looks interesting.

    By far the worst was the ISM touring saddle. I rode about two blocks, turned around and took it off. You have to be in some serious pain to make a horseshoe seat worth riding.

  33. #33
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    For $26 you cant go wrong. I am VERY happy with it so far. It is a good looking and lightweight saddle. Not nearly as cheap/dated looking as the WTB Speed-V it replaced.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CyclesnIPAs View Post
    For $26 you cant go wrong. I am VERY happy with it so far. It is a good looking and lightweight saddle. Not nearly as cheap/dated looking as the WTB Speed-V it replaced.
    I had a WTB Pure-V seat on my older bike and always loved it. My new bike came with a WTB Silverado and that thing just absolutely killed my rear. I swapped seats and it made a ginormous difference. It is amazing how much difference a seat swap can make.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by blundar View Post
    I had a WTB Pure-V seat on my older bike and always loved it. My new bike came with a WTB Silverado and that thing just absolutely killed my rear. I swapped seats and it made a ginormous difference. It is amazing how much difference a seat swap can make.
    I agree 100%. Between my new saddle and new tires it feels like a new bike. Ginormous difference is the perfect description!

  36. #36
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    Just got my Charge Spoon today, for so little money it was worth taking a chance.

    Great seat for any price. It is almost identical in shape, weight and cushion to the Selle Italia Flite.

  37. #37
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    A lbs had a Charge fat bike on the floor. I pointed out the saddle, told them that thing is awesome. If you get a customer in here looking for a good reasonably priced saddle this is it. The guy seemed rather shocked lol.

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    I tried Spec's, Fizik, and WTB. Finally pulled the trigger on a Selle Charger. Love it.
    Very expensive, but I figured I could spend the money on a saddle now, or little blue pills later.

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    I see a lot of recommendations for go buy this saddle or this one...
    One recommendation I don't see is getting a professional bike fitting done.
    There's lots to consider that I'm not seeing recommendations for.

    Yes we all have sit bones.
    I guarantee that not everyone's are in the same place. We don't all wear the same size shoes right?

    Have you played with the seat angle fore and aft? Played with the seat height?
    One affects the other. You may feel the saddle is up to high, then adjust the angle of the saddle and it seems to low, or maybe just right.

    My point is you can spend a ton of money on saddles and never be comfortable. Spend the money one time with a shop who can properly fit you and you'll be $$ ahead.
    Proper shape, width, seat angle, and height will contribute more to comfortable miles than tire pressure or suspension settings ever will.

    I've been through all this. Spent the money finally and found there is all kind of measurements I had never considered.

    These days I have a WTB Pure V. I do multiple day tours routinely. I do not use padded shorts and I have no issues doing ~ 70 miles a day when on tour. The bike I use is fully rigid.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by CyclesnIPAs View Post
    I agree 100%. Between my new saddle and new tires it feels like a new bike. Ginormous difference is the perfect description!
    I am glad to to have helped you with your success.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hodo View Post
    I see a lot of recommendations for go buy this saddle or this one...
    One recommendation I don't see is getting a professional bike fitting done.
    There's lots to consider that I'm not seeing recommendations for.

    Yes we all have sit bones.
    I guarantee that not everyone's are in the same place. We don't all wear the same size shoes right?

    Have you played with the seat angle fore and aft? Played with the seat height?
    One affects the other. You may feel the saddle is up to high, then adjust the angle of the saddle and it seems to low, or maybe just right.

    My point is you can spend a ton of money on saddles and never be comfortable. Spend the money one time with a shop who can properly fit you and you'll be $$ ahead.
    Proper shape, width, seat angle, and height will contribute more to comfortable miles than tire pressure or suspension settings ever will.

    I've been through all this. Spent the money finally and found there is all kind of measurements I had never considered.

    These days I have a WTB Pure V. I do multiple day tours routinely. I do not use padded shorts and I have no issues doing ~ 70 miles a day when on tour. The bike I use is fully rigid.
    WTB Pure-V's are awesome!

  43. #43
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    Brooks B17. It's like an Ass Hammock.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeaBass_ View Post
    Brooks B17. It's like an Ass Hammock.
    I've been riding the Charge Spoon everyone is talking about, it's plenty good but I think I am swapping back to the Brooks. When I ride I forget that it's there and that is probably the best thing you can hope for.

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    I found one way to overkill this problem if nothing else works, I put a Serfas RX (like the WTB gels) on a pivoting suspension seat post and it was almost too cozy.

    I would have kept it but it is a fairly heavy combo and the backward travel of the pivot post takes getting used to. But if discomfort is so bad that you aren't riding and nothing else works, this might be a solution.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beach Ride View Post
    I've been riding the Charge Spoon everyone is talking about, it's plenty good but I think I am swapping back to the Brooks. When I ride I forget that it's there and that is probably the best thing you can hope for.
    I have mine mounted on a setback Sweetpost. It's pretty Cush.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by blundar View Post
    WTB Pure-V's are awesome!
    I tried a few saddles, fizik (dunno the name), wtb (Pure V, Rocket V, Volt, Silverado), specialized (henge and phenom), bontrager(again don't remember the name), and every time i come back to Pure V that came on my first bike. I ride without padded shorts, ride full squish bike, almost exclusively off road and i really can't stand rigid saddles with little padding. Each saddle i tried for at least 2 months to be sure and now when i bought Pure V Race, it's here to stay

  48. #48
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    I pulled the trigger on one of these a couple of years ago: Peak ? ISM I know it looks funky but, for me, it just plain works.

    I grabbed it based on this thread: http://forums.mtbr.com/general-discu...le-661603.html
    Last edited by Palapapapa; 11-10-2015 at 10:01 AM. Reason: Added Info

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hodo View Post
    I see a lot of recommendations for go buy this saddle or this one...
    One recommendation I don't see is getting a professional bike fitting done.
    There's lots to consider that I'm not seeing recommendations for.

    Yes we all have sit bones.
    I guarantee that not everyone's are in the same place. We don't all wear the same size shoes right?

    Have you played with the seat angle fore and aft? Played with the seat height?
    One affects the other. You may feel the saddle is up to high, then adjust the angle of the saddle and it seems to low, or maybe just right.

    My point is you can spend a ton of money on saddles and never be comfortable. Spend the money one time with a shop who can properly fit you and you'll be $$ ahead.
    Proper shape, width, seat angle, and height will contribute more to comfortable miles than tire pressure or suspension settings ever will.

    I've been through all this. Spent the money finally and found there is all kind of measurements I had never considered.

    These days I have a WTB Pure V. I do multiple day tours routinely. I do not use padded shorts and I have no issues doing ~ 70 miles a day when on tour. The bike I use is fully rigid.
    Yes, these saddle recommendation threads alway make me laugh. If the saddle I like is comfy for you it is just blind luck. Asses are like snowflakes so most of this is pointless.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    Asses are like snowflakes ...
    Yup, both tend to be found in large amounts at the exits of ski resort parking lots at 4PM.

  51. #51
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    Im pretty damn happy with the Charge Spoon. Every ride ive done so far its been awesome. It all but completely disappears beneath me.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by frankbonajr View Post


    Sent from my GT-N7100 using Tapatalk
    There's a bike in that pic...somewhere...

  53. #53
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    Sorry if I sound smug.
    The problem with saddles is that the problem is not the saddle.
    It is more likely a bike fit issue or a weight issue.
    I spent close to a grand in search for the holy grail of saddles.
    Then talking to a cat 1 road racer I was told the truth: lose weight.
    I did and it improved the situation immensely. All of a sudden that Spesh Toupe that I hated started feeling great. And actually that San Marco saddle that I had spent close to 300 on started feeling, well, like crap.
    Then I got a bike fit. That improved the saddle even more, weight was better distributed, stopped having numbness after long rides. Then I was able to do 4 hours on the trainer non-stop and go for century rides, etc etc.
    If I only knew then what I now know.....

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by cat5fred View Post
    Sorry if I sound smug.
    The problem with saddles is that the problem is not the saddle.
    It is more likely a bike fit issue or a weight issue.
    I spent close to a grand in search for the holy grail of saddles.
    Then talking to a cat 1 road racer I was told the truth: lose weight.
    I did and it improved the situation immensely. All of a sudden that Spesh Toupe that I hated started feeling great. And actually that San Marco saddle that I had spent close to 300 on started feeling, well, like crap.
    Then I got a bike fit. That improved the saddle even more, weight was better distributed, stopped having numbness after long rides. Then I was able to do 4 hours on the trainer non-stop and go for century rides, etc etc.
    If I only knew then what I now know.....
    Maybe you have a bubble butt that expands and contracts horizontally, moving your sit bones further away from the saddle when you gain weight and vice versa when you lose.
    My ass is flat no matter what my weight so once I found a saddle that was the correct width for my sit bones I was comfy. And it only took me 25 years to discover the Brooks B17 was a perfect fit out of the box without a break in and it only gets better each ride. I only had 2 saddles I would describe as comfy before that - a circa 2008 Bontrager Race saddle and the WTB Pure V, and the Brooks blows both of those away.
    Granted, bike fit is a big part of it too. I always use a level on top of the saddle when initially installing to ensure the nose has the slightest rise and always use a setback post with the saddle pretty much jacked to it's rearward most position as I have long legs. My method may not work for everbody but it works for me.

  55. #55
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    Sorry if I sound smug but...

    So the fat guy gets skinny, has his bike fit and now he can solve everyone's saddle issues by following his lead? While you may have some sound advice for a certain audience, that's not me... and I find your blanket statement is utter nonsense.

    Quote Originally Posted by cat5fred View Post
    Sorry if I sound smug.
    The problem with saddles is that the problem is not the saddle.
    It is more likely a bike fit issue or a weight issue.
    I spent close to a grand in search for the holy grail of saddles.
    Then talking to a cat 1 road racer I was told the truth: lose weight.
    I did and it improved the situation immensely. All of a sudden that Spesh Toupe that I hated started feeling great. And actually that San Marco saddle that I had spent close to 300 on started feeling, well, like crap.
    Then I got a bike fit. That improved the saddle even more, weight was better distributed, stopped having numbness after long rides. Then I was able to do 4 hours on the trainer non-stop and go for century rides, etc etc.
    If I only knew then what I now know.....

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by EatsDirt View Post
    Sorry if I sound smug but...

    So the fat guy gets skinny, has his bike fit and now he can solve everyone's saddle issues by following his lead? While you may have some sound advice for a certain audience, that's not me... and I find your blanket statement is utter nonsense.
    I was a cat5 racer when I had the issues, at 190 lbs. So yes, compared to most competitive cyclist I was heavy, probably lots of unnecessary upper body mass (still am). Once I dropped to below 175 the same saddle that was so problematic stopped being so. The other point I was trying to make is that most recreational riders are sitting too erect placing most of their weight on their butts. Low saddle height is also another reason for saddle discomfort. Moving around also helps, instead of remaining static on the same position for the whole duration of the ride, etc etc.

    BTW, you also contradicted yourself in your post. But whatever....looks like our forum etiquette is different.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeaBass_ View Post
    Maybe you have a bubble butt that expands and contracts horizontally, moving your sit bones further away from the saddle when you gain weight and vice versa when you lose.
    My ass is flat no matter what my weight so once I found a saddle that was the correct width for my sit bones I was comfy. And it only took me 25 years to discover the Brooks B17 was a perfect fit out of the box without a break in and it only gets better each ride. I only had 2 saddles I would describe as comfy before that - a circa 2008 Bontrager Race saddle and the WTB Pure V, and the Brooks blows both of those away.
    Granted, bike fit is a big part of it too. I always use a level on top of the saddle when initially installing to ensure the nose has the slightest rise and always use a setback post with the saddle pretty much jacked to it's rearward most position as I have long legs. My method may not work for everbody but it works for me.
    What kind of bike do you have and what kind of riding do you do? No ass stays flat if you are going to ride for some time. And by that I mean > 3 hrs.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by cat5fred View Post
    What kind of bike do you have and what kind of riding do you do? No ass stays flat if you are going to ride for some time. And by that I mean > 3 hrs.
    I'm a tall lanky white dude. My ass is flat 24/7/365.

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simplemind View Post
    Try on some of the Chromag's. I got their Trailmaster LTD leather version and it's been my favorite for over 2 yrs.
    yup! yup! mah booty is very happy on these saddles!

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by cat5fred View Post
    I was a cat5 racer when I had the issues, at 190 lbs. So yes, compared to most competitive cyclist I was heavy, probably lots of unnecessary upper body mass (still am). Once I dropped to below 175 the same saddle that was so problematic stopped being so. The other point I was trying to make is that most recreational riders are sitting too erect placing most of their weight on their butts. Low saddle height is also another reason for saddle discomfort. Moving around also helps, instead of remaining static on the same position for the whole duration of the ride, etc etc.

    BTW, you also contradicted yourself in your post. But whatever....looks like our forum etiquette is different.
    You came into a saddle specific thread and made the ultimate statement "the problem with saddles is that it's not the saddle" as if you are an authority on the subject. It's beyond smug, and I'm not sure you're qualified to talk to me about etiquette.

    That's great that you've figured out some of the basics, but realize that some of us have specific anatomical needs from a saddle.

  61. #61
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    Something I haven't seen mentioned yet, the other 'Big S' (Shimano) has a line of saddles that prescribes to the notion that your riding/pedaling style also figures significantly (as well as other factors) into the shape/construction of saddle that will work best for you. Lots of different [I]angles[I] that may need to be considered. And then, at some point, if could just come down to some other attribute that sways you to one saddle over another.

    I have found that the more I ride, the wider variety of saddles that I can tolerate. It took years to get there for me. I guess I could say that saddles have been more of a journey than a destination, as I have gone through a few phases of saddle types that worked for me.

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