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Thread: FS to HT

  1. #1
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    FS to HT

    My younger brother and I share a Jamis Dakar, which has been great for what we have been riding. Mostly dirt trails through the woods full of roots etc. I recently took out my fathers HT on the same trail and actually found the ride not to be as rough as I had been expecting, although I plan on doing some harder riding once I get my own bike.

    Anyways, Im looking to buy my own bike soon, and dont really want to spend a ton of money so I was thinking of going hardtail, I love the FS feel but I cant spend $1500+ right now. I posted this for input from the HT riders... how much abuse can a HT really take as far as roots and smaller drops.

    When I first got this sport I was expecting to take some drops (werent we all?) and ive found that the riding Ive been doing hasnt really come across any 4' drops and that I was probably doing too much dreaming.

    That said, can a HT be found in the $750 range that can take abuse and that doesnt come with cheap accessories?

    For the locals, I will be riding Capitol Forest and surrounding areas...

  2. #2

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    I'd wager to say the average quality hardtail can take much MORE abuse than a similiar FS rig. At the very least there is considerably less to worry about maintaining or breaking. I'm not terribly familiar with complete bikes in the $750 range, but if you want something hardy enough for drops, i'd look at the Specialized P-series to start. I'm a retrogrouch myself, and where i in your shoes i'd be looking at getting a deal on a complete Kona Unit. Rigid, and SS w/ sliding drops for $799 retail. Also, in response to doing drops...airtime is fun, and makes for great media, but i'll take slow technical riding, anyday. A wheelie drop is a wheelie drop, be it off a curb, or an 8 foot ladder. Skills stay the same, but the joints take a little more pain.

  3. #3

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    P.3

    Check my signature.




    Quote Originally Posted by thesacrifice
    My younger brother and I share a Jamis Dakar, which has been great for what we have been riding. Mostly dirt trails through the woods full of roots etc. I recently took out my fathers HT on the same trail and actually found the ride not to be as rough as I had been expecting, although I plan on doing some harder riding once I get my own bike.

    Anyways, Im looking to buy my own bike soon, and dont really want to spend a ton of money so I was thinking of going hardtail, I love the FS feel but I cant spend $1500+ right now. I posted this for input from the HT riders... how much abuse can a HT really take as far as roots and smaller drops.

    When I first got this sport I was expecting to take some drops (werent we all?) and ive found that the riding Ive been doing hasnt really come across any 4' drops and that I was probably doing too much dreaming.

    That said, can a HT be found in the $750 range that can take abuse and that doesnt come with cheap accessories?

    For the locals, I will be riding Capitol Forest and surrounding areas...

  4. #4
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    (That said, can a HT be found in the $750 range that can take abuse and that doesnt come with cheap accessories?)

    The Gary Fisher Sugar 3+ that I own makes me believe that a FS bike will offer more fun than HT in a long run, especially on technical downhills. The bike is discountinue on 2+ and 3+ model (only the top end race model still available), so I found that used to be $1600 bike costs as low as $750 on ebay now! (1 year old, low milage sugar 3+).
    I am so happy on this FS bike coming from riding hard tail for a few years, and you can take advantage on the marketing shift and price cut (not affecting the performance), other similar one is Specialized FSR Xc, they come out a new model and the 2003 model is dirt cheap now.

  5. #5

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    Catamount.

    Fast like hardtail. Smooth like FS. Handles like a dream. (wife's bike, but she let's me ride it sometimes)

    $750, down from about $2000 a couple years ago. Decent components.

    http://www.cambriabicycleoutfitters....nsion_bike.htm

  6. #6

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    there is no comparison but...

    first off for $750 you can get a very sweet hardtail tons to choose from. same cannot be said for a fully. a hardtail offers some advatages though. i think everyone should start off on a HT. a fully is almost cheating i doesn't take as much skill to ride a fully as the suspension makes up for alot of rider errors. the HT teaches you to ride smooth and in control. both very important qualities. once you have saved enough for the fully sell your HT and blow away your friends with all the skill you have gained on your HT. your suspension will last longer because you ride smoother, you will have better balance and better control. the HT teaches you to ride the bike where as the fully takes you along for the ride. the specialized hardrock pro-disc, $610, is a perfect starter, can take a beating and has everything you need to get started, money left over for a new helmet, some shoes, new gloves and some Knee/shin guards for those urban rides and big drops that are in store for you.

  7. #7

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    I've got mixed feelings on this. Like most others on this board, I learned on a hardtail, and I feel like I am a better rider for it.

    On the other hand, My wifes first bike is a FS, and I have to admit, she is progressing even faster than I did when I first started, and she is enjoying herself a heck of a lot.

    It's kind of like saying everyone should learn to ride on the original beach cruisers, since everything since then is cheating on the original two wheel concept.

    I'm not trying to be a smartass, I've struggled with this myself. Where do you draw the line, and why is that line between one shock and two? The purist and technofile in me are in serious conflict.

  8. #8
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    for 750.00 HT is the way to go

    Quote Originally Posted by thesacrifice
    My younger brother and I share a Jamis Dakar, which has been great for what we have been riding. Mostly dirt trails through the woods full of roots etc. I recently took out my fathers HT on the same trail and actually found the ride not to be as rough as I had been expecting, although I plan on doing some harder riding once I get my own bike.

    Anyways, Im looking to buy my own bike soon, and dont really want to spend a ton of money so I was thinking of going hardtail, I love the FS feel but I cant spend $1500+ right now. I posted this for input from the HT riders... how much abuse can a HT really take as far as roots and smaller drops.

    When I first got this sport I was expecting to take some drops (werent we all?) and ive found that the riding Ive been doing hasnt really come across any 4' drops and that I was probably doing too much dreaming.

    That said, can a HT be found in the $750 range that can take abuse and that doesnt come with cheap accessories?

    For the locals, I will be riding Capitol Forest and surrounding areas...
    You will end up with a POS at that price for a dually

  9. #9
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    BikeNazi is correct.

    Get yourself a steel hardtail. It'll be relatively smooth on the bumps, a lot lighter than any FS rig (even at $750) and MUCH more durable. FS bikes have multiple pivots, shock mounts, and other moving parts which are 1) small and 2) experience severe loads in all directions. Ask an engineer which is more durable, or just think about it for a minute.

    FS bikes have definite advantages but durability isn't one of them. If you love riding mountain bikes, a hardtail will not detract from that experience.

    -Walt

  10. #10

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    i ride both HT and fully

    i hear ya on the old fart back in tha day blah blah blah, but i can say from experience that i ride slopier when i ride the fully, i just don't focus as much and tend to ride much to fast. i love it though. i would not trade in my fully for anything it is truly an amazing bike, but when i say it is like cheating that comes from personal experience, maybe not your experience but that is what it felt like to me when i first started riding full suspension, the roots and rocks that i had to avoid, the sections i had to walk, the steeps, the slow technical sections, they all disapeared. but those bike handling skills, the balance i learned, the brake modulation all those things have saved my ass more than once while riding the fully. thats all i am saying, ride whatever you can afford and have fun, each has its pros and cons.

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