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  1. #1
    richeyr
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    Enduro or Jeckyll

    I am coming off a hardtial for two years and would like to take the leap to full suspension. I live in Indiana so I don't have tough terrain or many hills. I do like to take mountain biking trips to other states and have ridden some very technical trails. I am looking for the ultimate in comfort and an all around "do it all bike". I mostly ride fast singletrack so need something that won't bob too much when out of seat. I have tried the Giant NRS bikes and didn't like the rigidness of the bike = too much of a race bike. I hear good things about the long travel XC bike and am leaning towards the 2005 Jekyll or the Specialized Enduro. I am taking other considerations also. Hopefully I will not spend over 1800. Ideally I would like to spend about 1500. I hear good things about the Yeti 575, but have no dealer around me. Please give me some input. I really like the geo. of the Jekyll and have not test rode the Enduro yet.

  2. #2
    contains quinine
    Reputation: Debaser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by richeyr
    I live in Indiana so I don't have tough terrain or many hills. I do like to take mountain biking trips to other states and have ridden some very technical trails. I am looking for the ultimate in comfort and an all around "do it all bike"... ....I hear good things about the long travel XC bike and am leaning towards the 2005 Jekyll or the Specialized Enduro. I am taking other considerations also. Hopefully I will not spend over 1800. Ideally I would like to spend about 1500. I hear good things about the Yeti 575, but have no dealer around me. Please give me some input. I really like the geo. of the Jekyll and have not test rode the Enduro yet.
    If you like the Enduro but don't ride technical trails all the time, check out Special Ed's 120 Stumpjumper, new this year. I'm riding an Enduro and I would have thought seriously about that bike if it had been an option last year...
    Take the long cut, we'll get there eventually.

  3. #3
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    yep agree and

    I'd also have a look at the '04 Iron Horse Hollowpoint Expert at Supergo, clearing out at $1399-$1599 (don't know why that varies). Stable platform shock and fork, 5" front and rear, Hayes discs, just darn hard to beat for value.

    After a year on a clearance Enduro though, I've had nothing but one excellent ride after another, the bike is just a pleasure to use on lots of hard trails. I use mine for flat easy stuff, but also for technical on Vancouver's north shore. Mine's the 4" model from '03, wish I had 5", it would make it perfect.

    Good luck , Jim

  4. #4
    richeyr
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    That is a good deal on the hollowpoint, but I won't have the money till tax time = just in time for spring riding.

  5. #5
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    I hope not to bring up any riots toward my opinion on C'dale, theve had many problems over the years...

    I believe that Specialized has some of the best suspension desgins in the Production Industry...

    Spec. pattented suspension desgins have been purchased by Iron Horse and Giant (sure other companies are looking or have purchased)for there bikes...In my mind this really says something that there designs are some of the best.....

    I would go with a spec., I was able to ride an 04 C'dale Jeckyll 600 and I believe that my 04 Spec Epic (cross country race bike) has a smoother ride for somthing considered all-mountain...

    Check out there new Stumpy's, theve added more travel for '05....

    What ever you choose, I'm sure you'll be happy...
    Take your time shopping, look at lots of bikes, ride lots of bikes, and then hopefully you will find the one....

    -Goodluck

  6. #6
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    Jekyll

    I hope not to bring up any riots toward my opinion on C'dale, theve had many problems over the years...

    Please elaborate as i must have missed them!


    anyway, either bike you go with will do what you want it to. the main thing is being fit and comfortable on the bike of your choice--and therefore it will perform better for you. i am partial to cannondale in this instance, especially since i have been riding a jekyll for years now. a couple years ago i broke the frame (unknowingly only had about 1/2 inch seatpost in the frame----after a month or so of heavy riding it gave way. cannondale replaced the frame no problem even though it was obviously my fault 100%) the shop that i used to work at carries both brands, and everyone i worked with rode cannondale's. you may even want to look at the c-dale prophet!

    now there are better bikes out there, but you will pay for them. i am currently getting ready to order a hammerhead and sell the jekyll, but i am also planning on dropping 4K on it ----- bottom line is both are great companies, so get which bike you feel more comfortable on and enjoy
    The nine most terrifying words in the English language are, 'I'm from the government and I'm here to help.' --Ronald Reagan

  7. #7
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    Ok, so what I said was a little drastic, but I belive that there frames aren't as well built as those of other manufacturers (heard of many people cracking these frames more than other companies)...

    In example, C'dale almost went bankrupt in the 90's b/c they spent tons of money on some proto-type dirt bike (motocross) that never saw production...They obviously didn't know Honda and Suzuki are in existance....They were susposidly saved by a former owner....

    I'm not saying they suck, I'm sure there are companies that make much worse frames, but if I were to spend a lot of money on a new bike I would demand an excelent suspension design...

    Keep in mind this is my opinion, just like everyone elses.....Some will love C'dale & others will hate them....

  8. #8
    Are you talking to me?
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    Close...

    Quote Originally Posted by New2Mountain6
    In example, C'dale almost went bankrupt in the 90's b/c they spent tons of money on some proto-type dirt bike (motocross) that never saw production...They obviously didn't know Honda and Suzuki are in existance....They were susposidly saved by a former owner....



    Keep in mind this is my opinion, just like everyone elses.....Some will love C'dale & others will hate them....

    The MX bikes and ATV's were for sale. Lack of sales, and spending 4 years and 80 million instead of their projected 2 years and 20 million did not help.

    That had little to do with the Bicycle side of things, as the bike side was always a moneymaker.

    They tried, including building thier own powerplants. They did go bankrupt, but that happened because the Bicycle and Motorsprots divisions were not seperated by different Corporations. It happens.

    However, the bicycle side of the business is going STRONG!
    gfy

  9. #9
    Bike to the Bone...
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    Both are good, but Specialized rules

    Hi. I had a Jekyll 800 and now have a Stumpjumper FSR. Both are very good bikes, but overall I think that the stumpy has a better back suspension system (FSR). Also, the bike is more compatible if you want to make upgrades.

    Also, Cannondale has released the new Prophet, and I think he has just one model of Jekyll, which I think is to sell the remaining Jekyll frames.

    What I like about the Jekyll is the Lefty, for me it's a better fork than the Manitou Black Elite that the Stumpjumper has.

    Any way you choose, I think you'll get a good bike!

    Thanks

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by richeyr
    I am coming off a hardtial for two years and would like to take the leap to full suspension. I live in Indiana so I don't have tough terrain or many hills. I do like to take mountain biking trips to other states and have ridden some very technical trails. I am looking for the ultimate in comfort and an all around "do it all bike". I mostly ride fast singletrack so need something that won't bob too much when out of seat. I have tried the Giant NRS bikes and didn't like the rigidness of the bike = too much of a race bike. I hear good things about the long travel XC bike and am leaning towards the 2005 Jekyll or the Specialized Enduro. I am taking other considerations also. Hopefully I will not spend over 1800. Ideally I would like to spend about 1500. I hear good things about the Yeti 575, but have no dealer around me. Please give me some input. I really like the geo. of the Jekyll and have not test rode the Enduro yet.

    Where you live in IN? i Live in central IN and ride southern IN,KY,and NC on a regular basis. As for your question, I'd go with the enduro. That's what I ride. I think the suspension is far superior to a cannondale. Go to Matthews on pendleton pike and check out the specialized line. They probably will have what you are looking for! Debaser had a good point, check out the 120 stumpjumpers. They would be more than sufficient for any trail in this state.
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    Last edited by mtnbiker1973; 11-27-2004 at 08:16 PM.

  11. #11
    richeyr
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    I think the Stumpjumper 120 may be a little too steep in price. My budget is about 1500 to 2000. The stumpjumper 120's are like 2500. Anybody know about the Titus Moto lite?

  12. #12
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    Hi Ritchey

    You can go to the standard Stumpjumper FSR, I just bought a 2004 for 1,150 bucks. Maybe looking for a current year (2004) can get you a nice bike.

    Hope this helps

  13. #13
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    Motolite

    the motolite is in a different class IMHO. Jump over to the Titus forum and you will find plenty of info on the new motolite. As i mentioned earlier i am looking at getting a Hammerhead in the next couple of months, although i am seriously looking at the motolite as well. Ahhh -- Decisions, decisions!!!!

    with that said, realize that the motolite frame is going to be $1350 without any custom paining--then you have to build it. def worth the money, but will cost you!


    Good Luck
    The nine most terrifying words in the English language are, 'I'm from the government and I'm here to help.' --Ronald Reagan

  14. #14
    richeyr
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    Well after much debat I thik I will go with the FSR XC PRo. Since I live in Indiana there isn't much need for a top of the line bike. I am not real familiar with the fox triad rear shock, other that that, the heavier frame over the stumpjumper does not bother me. I actually prefer mechanical disk brakes as opposed to hydrolic also. If anybody has a fsr xc pro let me know your thoughts on it good or bad.
    Thanks

  15. #15
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    The design is sound and should be a good performer for you. You'll suffer in the weight department and I don't think you'll benefit from the best shock technology, but sometimes the best thing about bikes is upgrading!

    Seriously, have you looked at anything used? There are some good deals in the classifieds. Just a thought.

    BTW, hydraulics are better, but more fuss.

  16. #16
    Shocks...pegs...lucky!
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    A little biased

    Just about anything Specialized is going to work great for you. The XC Pro is a great bike and it has the Triad shock. It will ride just like the SJ bikes because of the FSR. Here's a test...In the parking lot of your local bike shop, test ride any single pivot bike, C'dale whatever. Ride over a small bump, no more than 2" tall, not a curb. Then ride the same bump with any full suspension Specialized (FSR). Watch the pedals kick back on the single pivot bike. You won't feel a thing on the FSR. Now try this, go down a bumpy hill, gradually apply braking pressure. See what happens on both bikes. The FSR will maintain balance and control while the single pivot bike will want to dive.
    Also, I'm a big fan of the Avid Cable disk brakes. I actually pulled the Hayes hydros off my 03 Big Hit DH for Avid cables. They are less hassle, no leaks, easy pad adjustment, no chance of boiling the fluid, easier to lengthen or shorten cable, mounting them w/o any rub is easier and properly adjusted, they have just as much power.
    As far as used bikes go, you'll probably be disappointed in the end.

    Good luck,
    Lavaman

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by richeyr
    I am coming off a hardtial for two years and would like to take the leap to full suspension. I live in Indiana so I don't have tough terrain or many hills. I do like to take mountain biking trips to other states and have ridden some very technical trails. I am looking for the ultimate in comfort and an all around "do it all bike". I mostly ride fast singletrack so need something that won't bob too much when out of seat. I have tried the Giant NRS bikes and didn't like the rigidness of the bike = too much of a race bike. I hear good things about the long travel XC bike and am leaning towards the 2005 Jekyll or the Specialized Enduro. I am taking other considerations also. Hopefully I will not spend over 1800. Ideally I would like to spend about 1500. I hear good things about the Yeti 575, but have no dealer around me. Please give me some input. I really like the geo. of the Jekyll and have not test rode the Enduro yet.
    Both the Enduro and Jeckyll will bob with out of the seat efforts, even with stable platform shock technology. I have ridden both bikes and prior to new shock technology they both bobbed noticeably, even with the Enduro sporting the highly touted 4bar suspension. Now with stable platform shocks, if you stay seated, both bikes are good pedalers with the enduro getting the nod IMO. I have not ridden the new enduro, but it should pedal well.

    The specialized enduro for 05 is a 6" bike bordering on hardcore trailriding/light freeriding and might be more than what you need, but could work great, especially as you begin to improve your skills and want to ride harder trails. The Stumpjumper may be a better fit for you than the Enduro. The Jeckyll is a decent bike for what you describe and both the Enduro and Jeckyll get good reviews year after year.

    Many people make the mistake of buying too much bike and never end up riding up to the bikes true potential. Dont get sucked into the hype that you need huge amounts of suspension to ride trails. For what you want to do a 4" bike will work also. Five inches is plenty. Also Consider bikes like the Giant vt series, Kona dawg, and Specialized Stumpjumper. There is always the used option also.

  18. #18
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    No question

    The enduro is by far the better of the two. I wouldn't even look at the Jeckly

  19. #19
    richeyr
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    Thanks for all your help. I put a hollowpoint expert on layaway till tax money comes back. I couldn't pass the deal of a Hollowpoint Expert for $1389 and with the option to put only $350 down now.

  20. #20
    Shocks...pegs...lucky!
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    You're right about the bob but that wasn't exactly what I was addressing with my post. I was addressing the kickback and drop-away that is characteristic of all single pivot/faux bar linkages. There are bikes that eliminate bob but they sacrifice small bump sensitivity - unless you have a remote lockout and feel like using it all the time. I rode what I thought were pretty good suspension designs until I got my first FSR bike. Those bikes included Diamondback (3 bikes), an Ellsworth Joker and a Kona Stinky 5. I jumped on my new FSR and could tell right away that all the brake jack and pedal feedback had disappeared. If you don't believe me, try the little test I described previously. I'm not saying all the other single pivots aren't worth the trouble but it just takes more effort to ride them b/c you have to adjust your weight back while braking and you have to resist the pedal feedback. It just equals more energy spent fighting the bike rather than doing "sweet jumps"!

    Lavaman
    Your mountain bike hates its life as a road bike.

  21. #21
    Bike to the Bone...
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    About the Titus Moto Lite

    I've read something in the Titus forum. I really liked what I saw. My dream bike was a Titus Switchblade, but now I think I'd prefer the Moto lite. But, I think that the cheapest configuration is above $3,000.

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