Results 1 to 63 of 63
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    83

    Disappointed with Cannondale Warranty

    My Beast of the East 2 frame cracked after about a year of riding. I'm not a huge guy (215#) and I don't ride it that hard.

    Cannondale, to their credit, was good about sending me a replacement frame pretty quickly. What's disappointing, though, is that they will not cover any of the labor to strip the bike down and build it back up, which my LBS estimates at ~$150.

    The shop where I bought it from did offer to comp me the labor, but the problem is they are about 2 hours. So with F-150 gas and waiting-around beers, it would pretty much be a wash.

    So now I have to pay to have the new frame shipped from that bike shop to my LBS, then pay to have my LBS rebuild it. All said and done, I'm going to be out close to $200.

    I understand that it is "standard" among major manufacturers to not cover labor on warranty replacements, but I really think Cannondale should make an exception in my case. To buy a $2,000+ bike, and a year later have to shell out $200, not to mention multiple weeks off the bike, for what is clearly an egregious manufacturing defect (there were cracks on both seatstay welds)...that is pretty disappointing. It's certainly not the kind of customer service that makes me ever want to buy a Cannondale again. Which is a shame, because I've always liked the Cannondale brand and had really enjoyed by BOTE up to this point.

    I'm curious, is there anyone out there who has ever been in a similar situation, either with Cannondale or another manufacturer, and gotten them to cover labor costs?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    449
    I think that's standard. I could be wrong.
    2003 Kona A
    2005 Kona A
    2012 Cannondale Hooligan
    2016 Salsa Deadwood

  3. #3
    SS Pusher Man
    Reputation: mtnbikej's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    7,389
    This is why you buy bikes from companies that you can deal with directly. That way they send you the frame, you build it up yourself and you don't have to pay for labor.

    Otherwise, this really comes down to you and your relationship with the LBS where you bought it. Really good shops will take care of the labor if the warranty issue was in the first year. Sounds like your shop isn't.

    Live and learn.
    Bicycles don’t have motors or batteries.

    Ebikes are not bicycles

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    83
    Well...Cannondale sent me a frame and I could certainly build it myself if I had the time, tools, and knowledge. And the shop where I bought it from did offer to do it for free but, like i said, they're two hours away. My LBS is a good shop but I can understand their not comping the labor since they didn't sell me the bike in the first place.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fairbanks007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    371
    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    What's disappointing, though, is that they will not cover any of the labor to strip the bike down and build it back up, which my LBS estimates at ~$150.

    The shop where I bought it from did offer to comp me the labor, but the problem is they are about 2 hours. So with F-150 gas and waiting-around beers, it would pretty much be a wash.
    Damn, dude...WTH kind of beer are you drinking, and how much?

    Say 75 mph for 2 hours, 300 miles round trip, an F-150'll get 20 mpg on the highway (how else are you doing 75 mph?) So, maybe 15-18 gallons of gas at ~ $3.50/gal. So far you're into this for around 63 bucks so far, max. You've got $87 for waiting around beers...that's quite a few. Maybe you'll need to budget for a hotel as well, in which case, yeah the math isn't gonna work out anymore.

    Alternatively, you could use half the beer budget to get the LBS mechanics a nice case of beers, forego the hotel expense, come out even with all your parts swapped over to the new frame, and wind up with some seriously great LBS karma.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    83
    Alright, I was obviously exaggerating a bit but...gas is more like $4 here in CA, and there's no way my '06 F-150 gets 20mpg at 75mph. So let's say $70+ in gas, plus at least one meal, a couple beers, and giving up an entire day driving and sitting around waiting for my bike....maybe I'm still ahead $50 in pure dollar terms, but it is not even close to worth it to give up my entire Saturday for $50.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    330
    Invest the $ in tools and do the work yourself. That way you learn about your bike and have pride in a self-built. This is also a good time for any upgrades you planned all along.
    2018 Motobecane Sturgis NX
    2016 Giant Toughroad SLR1

  8. #8
    All fat, all the time.
    Reputation: Shark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    7,894
    Just be happy you got the frame replaced. The other stuff ,(can't build it yourself, shop 2 hours away) is not really their problem.

  9. #9
    mbtr member
    Reputation: scottzg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    5,226
    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    My Beast of the East 2 frame cracked after about a year of riding. I'm not a huge guy (215#) and I don't ride it that hard.

    Cannondale, to their credit, was good about sending me a replacement frame pretty quickly. What's disappointing, though, is that they will not cover any of the labor to strip the bike down and build it back up, which my LBS estimates at ~$150.

    The shop where I bought it from did offer to comp me the labor, but the problem is they are about 2 hours. So with F-150 gas and waiting-around beers, it would pretty much be a wash.

    So now I have to pay to have the new frame shipped from that bike shop to my LBS, then pay to have my LBS rebuild it. All said and done, I'm going to be out close to $200.

    I understand that it is "standard" among major manufacturers to not cover labor on warranty replacements, but I really think Cannondale should make an exception in my case. To buy a $2,000+ bike, and a year later have to shell out $200, not to mention multiple weeks off the bike, for what is clearly an egregious manufacturing defect (there were cracks on both seatstay welds)...that is pretty disappointing. It's certainly not the kind of customer service that makes me ever want to buy a Cannondale again. Which is a shame, because I've always liked the Cannondale brand and had really enjoyed by BOTE up to this point.

    I'm curious, is there anyone out there who has ever been in a similar situation, either with Cannondale or another manufacturer, and gotten them to cover labor costs?
    The shop who sold you the bike will do the labor for FREE. Out of their pocket. Cannondale doesn't pay them.

    The local shop doesn't want to do free labor for some random dude.

    Cannondale sent you a free frame, and you're still under warranty.

    Cracks on both welds doesn't mean anything beyond that the load was evenly applied. I think you've been treated fairly. Yeah, it sucks to break a frame and have to deal with it... but this is par for the industry and you're being treated well. Some bike companies (sram) are weirdly accommodating when it comes to their warranty policy when the LBS says the right things, but imo this is because their supply chain is inferior to their competitor's. I think you're imagining there's a lot more profit in a bike sale than there is.


    Still sucks though.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    4,873
    Standard that the bike company doesn't cover labor at the LBS. The LBS here will cover the labor if the failure is within one year of purchase from them.
    Do the math.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    83
    The point is their product completely failed within a year of normal use and now I'm out $200 and several weeks of riding. I know it's "standard" for the industry, but doesn't make it right. If they wanted to keep me as a customer, they'd make me whole.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    4,319
    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    Alright, I was obviously exaggerating a bit but...gas is more like $4 here in CA, and there's no way my '06 F-150 gets 20mpg at 75mph. So let's say $70+ in gas, plus at least one meal, a couple beers, and giving up an entire day driving and sitting around waiting for my bike....maybe I'm still ahead $50 in pure dollar terms, but it is not even close to worth it to give up my entire Saturday for $50.
    you can’t go get a free warrant frame? i am being diplomatic by stating that decision making is bizarre.

    but pay the local shop then—your preferences—your problem.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    83
    And the fact that the LBS I bought it from would do it for free...that still doesn't say anything for Cannondale. Just means the LBS would be put out.

    To be clear, I'm not griping about either LBS.

    Finally...my LBS told me that at least some manufacturers would cover the labor in some situations, like when a product fails after a very short period. They said it used to be more common and often depended on how good a relationship the LBS had with them. So, while I know it's "standard," as I said in my original post, it's not unheard of and I think my situation warrants it.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    83
    Cjsb: I'm getting the friggin frame. My point is it's not worth making the drive to save on the labor so I'm having them ship it instead and pay the shop here to do it. Not sure why you're having so much trouble understanding that decision-making process...

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LargeMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    490
    Been in the business for 21 years, never once did a mfg cover warranty labor cost. You can be mad at C-Dale but you should not buy any other brand ever either because they all will handle it the same way, in fact half would skip around even with the warranty and tell you it is your fault and then you would be out of a whole bike. You really should be thankful to get anything, bike business sucks.

  16. #16
    Life's a ride, enjoy it! Moderator
    Reputation: life behind bars's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    3,971
    Cost of ownership. Move on.
    Wanted, SRAM GX 2x11 rear derailleur

    It ain't supposed to be easy.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fairbanks007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    371
    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    Cjsb: I'm getting the friggin frame. My point is it's not worth making the drive to save on the labor so I'm having them ship it instead and pay the shop here to do it. Not sure why you're having so much trouble understanding that decision-making process...
    To be honest, I'm having trouble understanding this as well. It's not "worth making the drive" to have the shop that you bought the bike from take care of their customer, but it is worth your time to try to publicly shame Cannondale for following the same policy as all other manufacturers? Weird.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    330
    You decided to buy from an LBS 2 hours away. to do warranty work, you obviously have to go there, they won't come to you. it isn't C'dale's fault you chose to buy from far away.

    don't worry about the LBs being out of money, that is what they got the markup for to provide some service.
    2018 Motobecane Sturgis NX
    2016 Giant Toughroad SLR1

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    83
    Okay. Clearly the consensus is I should be happy to get the frame. And I am. I said that in my very first post. But what I don't think anyone is considering is the fact that it broke after A YEAR. That's why this is bothering me. It's not like I rode this thing for 8 years. I rode it *maybe* 1000 miles, not hard, and it failed miserably. That's why I think it's warranted for Cannondale to go a little "above and beyond" to make sure I'm made whole. What if it cracked on the first ride? You guys would still think it's cool I'm out $200? Just because Cannondale is following "standard policy" for the industry. I guess I just expect more from people I give thousands of dollars to...

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    330
    you didn't go above and beyond and paid $100 in addition to what LBS asked for.... :-)
    Like for any warranty, they will honor what is written in it and keep sending yo frames until the end of the warranty. Once they run out of frames (they only keep warranty spares for so long), they may send you new bikes of that year.

    the $200 comes into play only because you don't want to do the relatively easy task of transferring parts yourself. Learn to wrench, or learn to pay. Sorry to be harsh, but it really is not that much work to do.

    i work with commercial buildings amd when a boiler heat exchanger fails, the manufacturer only sends a new heat exchanger and the labor is on us. And they play the game of how it is somehow our fault first for long. C'dale sent you a "no questions asked" replacement. Be happy with what you got, move on and ride.
    2018 Motobecane Sturgis NX
    2016 Giant Toughroad SLR1

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    4,319
    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    Okay. Clearly the consensus is I should be happy to get the frame. And I am. I said that in my very first post. But what I don't think anyone is considering is the fact that it broke after A YEAR. That's why this is bothering me. It's not like I rode this thing for 8 years. I rode it *maybe* 1000 miles, not hard, and it failed miserably. That's why I think it's warranted for Cannondale to go a little "above and beyond" to make sure I'm made whole. What if it cracked on the first ride? You guys would still think it's cool I'm out $200? Just because Cannondale is following "standard policy" for the industry. I guess I just expect more from people I give thousands of dollars to...
    suppose you had moved to within 5 minutes walking distance of the shop where you bought the bike—what then? Does Cannondale owe you a free happy meal, 6 pack, an Amazon gift card, all because it happened earlier than you think is reasonable for only the stated warranty?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  22. #22
    mbtr member
    Reputation: scottzg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    5,226
    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    Okay. Clearly the consensus is I should be happy to get the frame. And I am. I said that in my very first post. But what I don't think anyone is considering is the fact that it broke after A YEAR. That's why this is bothering me. It's not like I rode this thing for 8 years. I rode it *maybe* 1000 miles, not hard, and it failed miserably. That's why I think it's warranted for Cannondale to go a little "above and beyond" to make sure I'm made whole. What if it cracked on the first ride? You guys would still think it's cool I'm out $200? Just because Cannondale is following "standard policy" for the industry. I guess I just expect more from people I give thousands of dollars to...
    Well, first i think you wouldn't be out an imaginary 200$ if you'd bought from LBS. You bought it from a shop far away; that's on you.

    So you broke a frame at ~1000 miles. I've broken a LOT of mtb frames, and for me they fail at ~1000 miles, or they last until i get sick of them and they're retired. Wheels are the same way, fwiw. For me it's because i'm over-stressing them in normal use, and your having two failure points simultaneously implies you do the same. It's super shitty, but it implies that the frame is designed/built correctly and your use is excessively destructive compared to the intended user. I've learned to buy bikes designed for people like me, and good warranty support has meant that the learning curve hasn't been a financial disaster.

    Yeah, maybe you shouldn't buy any more cannondales. Maybe you should buy bikes from a local shop where you don't have to drive for hours for service in your gas hog. Maybe you should equip yourself to build up a frame, and save money in the long run. Nobody is screwing you, though.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    721
    I tend to agree that the policy of replacing a frame but not reimbursing dis/reassembly labor is chintzy beyond belief, industry standard though it may be. The warranty should place the victim in the same place as before, not including pain in the azz and downtime. Maybe it's justified because it covers some wear and tear and possible abuse.

    The trip to the selling LBS is going to have to be accounted for as pain in the azz and downtime. Unfortunately for you, it also includes some out of pocket.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    330
    Quote Originally Posted by TwiceHorn View Post
    I tend to agree that the policy of replacing a frame but not reimbursing dis/reassembly labor is chintzy beyond belief, industry standard though it may be. The warranty should place the victim in the same place as before, not including pain in the azz and downtime. Maybe it's justified because it covers some wear and tear and possible abuse.

    The trip to the selling LBS is going to have to be accounted for as pain in the azz and downtime. Unfortunately for you, it also includes some out of pocket.
    you make a good point with requiring to make the OP whole.... in theory.
    but if manufacturers had to do that, they would built bikes that are 5 lb heavier and cost $500 more to reduce failure and have a holdback for such warranty. there is no free lunch, they would have no choice. We want really light and really cheap bikes,and bikes that can take abuse and want 100% perfect service. Obviously meeting all requirements is not possible.

    The warranty conditions were known before purchase. Purchase meant agreeing to them by OP. It seems Cannondale met all those requirements.
    2018 Motobecane Sturgis NX
    2016 Giant Toughroad SLR1

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    721
    Quote Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
    you make a good point with requiring to make the OP whole.... in theory.
    but if manufacturers had to do that, they would built bikes that are 5 lb heavier and cost $500 more to reduce failure and have a holdback for such warranty. there is no free lunch, they would have no choice. We want really light and really cheap bikes,and bikes that can take abuse and want 100% perfect service. Obviously meeting all requirements is not possible.

    The warranty conditions were known before purchase. Purchase meant agreeing to them by OP. It seems Cannondale met all those requirements.
    Well the point about making the owner whole was OPs more than mine, but historically, that's what a warranty does.

    But, you raise a good point about the "criticality" (weight/strength tradeoff) of bike frames that may justify this type of warranty, which was kind of what I was driving at with the "wear and tear" and abuse comments, but adds a dimension.

    I wonder if the selling authorized dealer is required to do the warranty service at no cost to the customer? Maybe they get some kind of "capitation" fee for that?

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    4,873
    Quote Originally Posted by TwiceHorn View Post
    ...I wonder if the selling authorized dealer is required to do the warranty service at no cost to the customer? Maybe they get some kind of "capitation" fee for that?
    They are not and they don't. Automotive warranty labor is reimbursed to the dealer by the manufacturer at a specified rate. This isn't the case in the bike industry.

    Interfacing with the customer, examining the bike or component, creating the work order, storing the bike, composing and filing the claim with the manufacturer, following up with the customer, receiving and storing the associated parts is all time, work, and facility expense incurred by the shop that do not get reimbursed.
    Do the math.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fairbanks007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    371
    Quote Originally Posted by TwiceHorn View Post

    I wonder if the selling authorized dealer is required to do the warranty service at no cost to the customer? Maybe they get some kind of "capitation" fee for that?
    In my admittedly brief career as a LBS mechanic, I don't think this is the way it works. I'm pretty sure shops eat the labor on warranty repairs in an attempt to keep their customer happy.

    Somewhat related, I took a malfunctioning dropper post to a dealer for that brand to have warranty work done. Their first comment was, "You didn't buy that here!" (I never said I did, I was new to the area and they were the closest dealer) and then wanted me to pay $200 in labor to do the warranty work. Asking for more than half the cost of a new post for labor to do warranty work just told me they weren't all that interested in having me as a customer. Haven't been back since.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Rockadile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    256
    I agree with some of the others here. Use the money towards tools and learn to do the work yourself. Then you’ll never have this “problem” again.

  29. #29
    Cleavage Of The Tetons
    Reputation: rideit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,413
    Quote Originally Posted by Fairbanks007 View Post
    In my admittedly brief career as a LBS mechanic, I don't think this is the way it works. I'm pretty sure shops eat the labor on warranty repairs in an attempt to keep their customer happy.

    Somewhat related, I took a malfunctioning dropper post to a dealer for that brand to have warranty work done. Their first comment was, "You didn't buy that here!" (I never said I did, I was new to the area and they were the closest dealer) and then wanted me to pay $200 in labor to do the warranty work. Asking for more than half the cost of a new post for labor to do warranty work just told me they weren't all that interested in having me as a customer. Haven't been back since.
    That's not typically how a manufacturer warranty works. Normally it would go back to say, Fox or RS for service on a warranty call. The shop usually never assesses warranty eligigability for the manufacturer.

    (Owned a shop for a long time)
    "We LOVE cows! They make trails for us.....

    And then we eat them."

    Thrill Bikers Unite!

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    83
    Couple things and then I really am going to try to get off of this thread haha...

    First, I don't think I got screwed, and I have moved on with my life. I appreciate your concern, but I really am going to get through this 😢. Seriously, it's amazing how patronizing some people on this forum are. Obviously it's not the end of the damn world. All I ever said is I'm disappointed in the situation.

    Everyone saying, just fix it yourself, or the LBS would do it if you didn't live two hours away...you're kinda missing the point. Even if I did the work myself, I'd be out hours of time, money for tools, and, given my schedule, weeks more of riding time realistically. And the fact that the LBS would do it, that's no defense of the policy on the part of the mfg. I think its shitty that they all put it on the LBS and make them eat it.

    Bottom line, I think TwiceHorn said it best: it's chintzy. That's what it comes down to. And I'm really amazed SO many people on here apparently don't think there's anything wrong with this policy, even if it is widespread in the industry.

    I mean, if you bought a brand new car and a year later the fuel injector went out, and the mfg said, we'll send over a new injector, but the 5 hours labor to install it are on you---would you be cool with that? Of course not. A warranty that still requires you to shell out hundreds of dollars is not much of a warranty.

    Personally, where I come out on all this is...I think mfg's should have limited warranties, but should be prepared to make you whole if you suffer a claim in that time. I don't expect a "lifetime" warranty on a bike. I really don't. I don't expect that a bike should last forever. But I do expect it should last more than a year. And if it doesn't, I expect that neither I or my LBS will have to come out of pocket--or spend hours working on it and probably mess something up--to get me back riding.

    Maybe I'm in the minority here, but to me that is the kind of customer service I expect in any industry. That's why I'm disappointed.

    Now please God give me the strength to stop responding to this thread...

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wabiker3576's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    93
    Why does Cannondale have to make it Whole to you ? They are fulfilling their warranty that is written out and explained on all their paper work and website . The original bike shop is going above and beyond by offering to eat the labor to solve the issue , your LBS is charging accordingly , there is a lot of work involved , and they made no money off the sale of the bike . You chose to purchase it where you did , be it for sale tax purposes or great price on the bike , thats all you . Several people have mentioned that you repair it yourself , down side to that , you lose your warranty . You choose to complain about a couple hundred dollars to get your new frame built up , when you could be having to pay a couple of thousand dollars for a new frame to be built up .
    2013 Ellsworth Carbon Evolve XT
    2013 Ellsworth Enlightment XTR
    2013 Ellsworth Enlightment SS

    Bike Shop Employee

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1,173
    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    Couple things and then I really am going to try to get off of this thread haha...

    First, I don't think I got screwed, and I have moved on with my life. I appreciate your concern, but I really am going to get through this 😢. Seriously, it's amazing how patronizing some people on this forum are. Obviously it's not the end of the damn world. All I ever said is I'm disappointed in the situation.

    Everyone saying, just fix it yourself, or the LBS would do it if you didn't live two hours away...you're kinda missing the point. Even if I did the work myself, I'd be out hours of time, money for tools, and, given my schedule, weeks more of riding time realistically. And the fact that the LBS would do it, that's no defense of the policy on the part of the mfg. I think its shitty that they all put it on the LBS and make them eat it.

    Bottom line, I think TwiceHorn said it best: it's chintzy. That's what it comes down to. And I'm really amazed SO many people on here apparently don't think there's anything wrong with this policy, even if it is widespread in the industry.

    I mean, if you bought a brand new car and a year later the fuel injector went out, and the mfg said, we'll send over a new injector, but the 5 hours labor to install it are on you---would you be cool with that? Of course not. A warranty that still requires you to shell out hundreds of dollars is not much of a warranty.

    Personally, where I come out on all this is...I think mfg's should have limited warranties, but should be prepared to make you whole if you suffer a claim in that time. I don't expect a "lifetime" warranty on a bike. I really don't. I don't expect that a bike should last forever. But I do expect it should last more than a year. And if it doesn't, I expect that neither I or my LBS will have to come out of pocket--or spend hours working on it and probably mess something up--to get me back riding.

    Maybe I'm in the minority here, but to me that is the kind of customer service I expect in any industry. That's why I'm disappointed.

    Now please God give me the strength to stop responding to this thread...
    There's some kind of disconnect here with the LBS and you. If you were near your original LBS they would do it for free. However you live hours away, so you are not near the LBS. Whether you moved or whatever doesn't matter. It's your problem that you are hours away from the free service. What more can they do? What did you expect them to do? You really expected them to fly your warrantied frame and components to a different LBS of your choice, then pay for the labor outright?

    Seriously????

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    83
    I expected Cannondale to give me a labor credit that I could use at any LBS, and not stick it to me, or the LBS I bought it from, to make me whole due to a defective frame they sold. That's what any mfg would do in the automotive industry. I'm not sure why you all seem to think it's soooo ridiculous that I would expect that from a bicycle mfg.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1,173
    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    I expected Cannondale to give me a labor credit that I could use at any LBS, and not stick it to me, or the LBS I bought it from, to make me whole due to a defective frame they sold. That's what any mfg would do in the automotive industry. I'm not sure why you all seem to think it's soooo ridiculous that I would expect that from a bicycle mfg.
    You mean you expect them to pay for it? Just because you want them to!


    You know, I've never been given the option to take my car during warranty to have it repaired elsewhere with a repair credit. Auto dealerships are under a network, pre-contracted so on that you can just take your car to the closes dealership. Bikes and LBS' are not under a network franchised by the bike mfr. What you are suggesting is for the mfr to outright pay for your labor so you can take it to any LBS outside of the LBS that is the authorized dealer. That's rather ridiculous.

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LargeMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    490
    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    I expected Cannondale to give me a labor credit that I could use at any LBS, and not stick it to me, or the LBS I bought it from, to make me whole due to a defective frame they sold. That's what any mfg would do in the automotive industry. I'm not sure why you all seem to think it's soooo ridiculous that I would expect that from a bicycle mfg.
    Because the auto mfg makes a huge margin on the car, the dealer does not and in such gets labor. In the bike world margins are tiny, if the LBS were to do labor on warranty for free, eventually they go out of business, same for the mfg. I going out on a limb here, but I suspect you did not pay full MSRP, correct? So the dealer did not make any money, like I said the business model sucks, I had a customers warranty declined 3 weeks ago on a bike that was less then 6 days old, cost him $1500 to repair on a $3000 bike.

    Cannondale did a solid here and you are actually giving people a reason TO BUY a Cannondale with such great service after the bike was a year old.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    83
    Quote Originally Posted by LargeMan View Post
    Cannondale did a solid here and you are actually giving people a reason TO BUY a Cannondale with such great service after the bike was a year old.
    Haha well, hey, like I said in my OP I've always liked Cannondale. If this is really the best customer service one can expect these days in the bike industry, then I guess this has turned into an endorsement for Cannondale. I can live with that.

    Although I am separately hearing a lot of anecdotes that lead me to believe my frame's cracking after a year is maybe not such an anomaly for Cannondale so...that's still a lingering concern I have about ever buying one again.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    802
    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    I expected Cannondale to give me a labor credit that I could use at any LBS, and not stick it to me, or the LBS I bought it from, to make me whole due to a defective frame they sold. That's what any mfg would do in the automotive industry. I'm not sure why you all seem to think it's soooo ridiculous that I would expect that from a bicycle mfg.
    I understand where your expectations are coming from being a fairly new rider. Overall you will find that bike manufacturers will use any opportunity to leave the LBS holding the bag. Some LBS' will bend over backwards to help you out like yours did but overall most will transfer that cost to you. Do not listen to some of these curmudgeons that are implying that your expectations are out of line. They are not, these folks are just used to being screwed over so they know no other way.

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    721
    I guess we need to distinguish between what we wish for (to be made enitrely whole, including down time and pain in the azz), what the law provides for in the absence of an express written warranty, and what Cannondale's express written warranty provides.

    Cannondale's warranty couldn't be much clearer, as it is written: https://www.cannondale.com/en/USA/WarrantyInfo, to wit:

    All labor charges for warranty service, including the transfer of components and/or any installation of new components, are the responsibility of the bicycle's owner. Due to product evolution and obsolescence, some components may not be available for older models. In these cases, sourcing and paying for components is the responsibility of the bicycles owner.
    So, yeah, in some abstract way, it would be nice if Cannondale, or anyone else, did it differently, but anyone who buys one specifically contracts for this treatment. And, it's a fairly typical bike warranty these days. I suppose, too, that one could argue that Cannondale should go above and beyond the written warranty because this particular bike failed early.

    But here we are. Caveat emptor.

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    83
    Thanks Brodino. It's nice to know at least one person on this planet sympathizes with me

    And I do appreciate the insight from LargeMan and others who work in the industry. I still am disappointed, but you've helped give me some perspective into why things are the way they are in the industry.


    As far as looking at the specific terms of Cannondale's warranty, which several people have alluded to, that's never really been what this is about. I work for a company that sells a product that comes with a "warranty" of sorts (it's software, so obviously not exactly the same, but contractually what we offer is analogous to a warranty). And one of my roles is actually being in charge of handling warranty claims. I also write the contracts that contain the warranties. So I have some perspective on this, albeit from a completely different industry. And the way I look at when reviewing warranty claims is: there's what's in the contract, and there's what we need to do to do right by the customer and keep them happy. My company regularly paya out warranty claims that are technically not valid under the terms of the customer's contract because we feel that we screwed up somehow, and we want to make the customer whole. That's the sort of treatment I expect from Cannondale--it's not that I think they're breaching the terms of their contract or anything like that.

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    4,319
    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    Couple things and then I really am going to try to get off of this thread haha...

    First, I don't think I got screwed, and I have moved on with my life. I appreciate your concern, but I really am going to get through this . Seriously, it's amazing how patronizing some people on this forum are. Obviously it's not the end of the damn world. All I ever said is I'm disappointed in the situation.

    Everyone saying, just fix it yourself, or the LBS would do it if you didn't live two hours away...you're kinda missing the point. Even if I did the work myself, I'd be out hours of time, money for tools, and, given my schedule, weeks more of riding time realistically. And the fact that the LBS would do it, that's no defense of the policy on the part of the mfg. I think its shitty that they all put it on the LBS and make them eat it.

    Bottom line, I think TwiceHorn said it best: it's chintzy. That's what it comes down to. And I'm really amazed SO many people on here apparently don't think there's anything wrong with this policy, even if it is widespread in the industry.

    I mean, if you bought a brand new car and a year later the fuel injector went out, and the mfg said, we'll send over a new injector, but the 5 hours labor to install it are on you---would you be cool with that? Of course not. A warranty that still requires you to shell out hundreds of dollars is not much of a warranty.

    Personally, where I come out on all this is...I think mfg's should have limited warranties, but should be prepared to make you whole if you suffer a claim in that time. I don't expect a "lifetime" warranty on a bike. I really don't. I don't expect that a bike should last forever. But I do expect it should last more than a year. And if it doesn't, I expect that neither I or my LBS will have to come out of pocket--or spend hours working on it and probably mess something up--to get me back riding.

    Maybe I'm in the minority here, but to me that is the kind of customer service I expect in any industry. That's why I'm disappointed.

    Now please God give me the strength to stop responding to this thread...
    I can't resist either because there is nothing chintzy about honoring the warranty and the original shop not charging for the work. That is as good as it gets.

    If you wanted the Gas Hog addendum or Hobo Tramp travel Addendum to the warranty then you should have bargained for such. But they cost more.

    Sent from my moto x4 using Tapatalk

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,483
    I would think that the bike shop would want to make you happy by not charging full pop for the rebuild. it sounds like, if you brought in a frame and a bunch of parts, $150 for a full custom build would be worth it. but if you bought the bike there, or they are at least trying to represent Cannondale well as a dealer, they would charge a nominal amount for a "warranty rebuild." I know it will take more than hour of their time to do the job (if they do it well), and bike mechanics don't literally work for free (but it's close), but they would make more money long-term by hooking you up after they, or the company they kind of represent, sold you a bike that broke.

    also, friend of mine has broken three F100 frames at the seat tube/ top tube junction. he is going through them at a rate of one per year and they are about to send him his fourth frame.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1,173
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I would think that the bike shop would want to make you happy by not charging full pop for the rebuild. it sounds like, if you brought in a frame and a bunch of parts, $150 for a full custom build would be worth it. but if you bought the bike there, or they are at least trying to represent Cannondale well as a dealer, they would charge a nominal amount for a "warranty rebuild." I know it will take more than hour of their time to do the job (if they do it well), and bike mechanics don't literally work for free (but it's close), but they would make more money long-term by hooking you up after they, or the company they kind of represent, sold you a bike that broke.

    also, friend of mine has broken three F100 frames at the seat tube/ top tube junction. he is going through them at a rate of one per year and they are about to send him his fourth frame.
    You're missing the gist of it. Cdale and the LBS that he bought the bike from have him covered. That means no cost to him to replace frame and rebuild the bike.

    The problem is he doesn't want to have "that" LBS to perform the warranty and instead wants Cdale to pay/credit for him to have a different LBS do the service of his choosing. The reason for this is that apparently he is hours away from the shop he bought the bike from.

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fairbanks007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    371
    Quote Originally Posted by rideit View Post
    That's not typically how a manufacturer warranty works. Normally it would go back to say, Fox or RS for service on a warranty call. The shop usually never assesses warranty eligigability for the manufacturer.

    (Owned a shop for a long time)
    I understand that. I must not have been clear. The LBS contacted the manufacturer and it was determined that the failure was covered under warranty. The LBS was asking for $200 in labor to install the parts the manufacturer had already said were defective. In this case, it was $200 labor to install less than $25 dollars worth of parts. Granted, they had not sold me the post, but they were the local dealer for the manufacturer.

    My point stands. There was no way $200 in labor to install those parts. Had they wanted to keep me as a customer, they wouldn't have asked for such an exorbitant amount. Clearly they didn't care since I hadn't purchased the post from them. Whatever. I paid to have the post fixed (cost me less than $100 including parts and shipping) and I learned not to do business with that LBS.

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fairbanks007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    371
    Quote Originally Posted by LargeMan View Post
    Because the auto mfg makes a huge margin on the car, the dealer does not and in such gets labor. In the bike world margins are tiny, if the LBS were to do labor on warranty for free, eventually they go out of business, same for the mfg.
    This pretty much sums it up. The OP clearly has no idea that the margins in the bike world are all but nonexistent, or that his $2000(ish) BOE is basically considered an entry level bike by serious riders. Nothing wrong with that, I ride a near entry level Specialized. But he's expecting Rolls Royce level service on a Chevrolet.

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    330
    You can get the same warranty service like for cars. But then the bike will weigh 3,000 pounds and cost $30K... like cars nowadays.
    2018 Motobecane Sturgis NX
    2016 Giant Toughroad SLR1

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    4,319
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I would think that the bike shop would want to make you happy by not charging full pop for the rebuild. it sounds like, if you brought in a frame and a bunch of parts, $150 for a full custom build would be worth it. but if you bought the bike there, or they are at least trying to represent Cannondale well as a dealer, they would charge a nominal amount for a "warranty rebuild." I know it will take more than hour of their time to do the job (if they do it well), and bike mechanics don't literally work for free (but it's close), but they would make more money long-term by hooking you up after they, or the company they kind of represent, sold you a bike that broke.

    also, friend of mine has broken three F100 frames at the seat tube/ top tube junction. he is going through them at a rate of one per year and they are about to send him his fourth frame.
    Agree with you in that these circumstances can present opportunities for everyone involved.

    The OP has nothing to offer the$200 build shop, except the $200, maybe negotiated down to $150 as you state. But expecting the same shop to comp. him $150-200 worth of labor is , to put it diplomatically, unreasonable.

    The story about driving farther to get the frame and free rebuild apparently wasn’t a hurdle when it came to buying the bike, and if you discounted the risk of having to return to the shop where you purchased the bike from, oh well...

    If I were the $200 build shop I would look at this situation with skpeticism, too, as the future return is likely next to nil.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wideawakejake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    226
    Definatley not 3rd World problems. Drive the dam bike to the shop, set up a tent, build a fire, and read a good book or two. ...than try not to break your frame again.

  48. #48
    SS Pusher Man
    Reputation: mtnbikej's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    7,389
    Think about how this would have gone had be bought the bike online.
    Bicycles don’t have motors or batteries.

    Ebikes are not bicycles

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jeremy3220's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    1,069
    Quote Originally Posted by cjsb View Post
    The story about driving farther to get the frame and free rebuild apparently wasn’t a hurdle when it came to buying the bike
    Exactly. This thread reminds me why working retail sucks.

  50. #50
    Music & Bikes
    Reputation: fokof's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,392
    An interesting read :
    https://www.cannondale.com/en/USA/WarrantyInfo




    "......This limited warranty applies only to bicycles purchased in assembled and adjusted condition from Authorized Cannondale Retailers.

    This limited warranty is void if the bicycle is subjected to abuse, neglect, improper repair, improper assembly, lack of proper maintenance according to the owner’s manual, alteration, modification, installation of incompatible parts, corrosion, an accident or other abnormal, excessive, or improper use....... "
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1,173
    Quote Originally Posted by fokof View Post
    An interesting read :
    https://www.cannondale.com/en/Canada/WarrantyInfo




    "......This limited warranty applies only to bicycles purchased in assembled and adjusted condition from Authorized Cannondale Retailers.

    This limited warranty is void if the bicycle is subjected to abuse, neglect, improper repair, improper assembly, lack of proper maintenance according to the owner’s manual, alteration, modification, installation of incompatible parts, corrosion, an accident or other abnormal, excessive, or improper use....... "
    Man, what a shite company talk about using every loophole to get out of backing your product.

  52. #52
    Music & Bikes
    Reputation: fokof's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,392
    If I read the OP right , he got his frame warrantied.
    No problems there ...... pretty much standard that they don'y pay for labor.

    Just posted this as to suggest to let the LBS mount the bike instead of himself
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  53. #53
    Music & Bikes
    Reputation: fokof's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,392
    FYI
    Trek:
    "......THIS WARRANTY DOES NOT COVER:
    Normal wear and tear
    Improper assembly
    Improper follow-up maintenance
    Installation of components, parts, or accessories not originally intended for or compatible with the bicycle as sold
    Damage or failure due to accident, misuse, abuse, or neglect
    Labor charges for part replacement or changeover
    Bikes used for commercial activities, including those in rental, demo, or security fleets...."

    https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/trek_bikes_warranty/

    Specialized:


    "......This Warranty is void under the following circumstances and does not apply to damage caused by:
    • Improper assembly or installation.
    • Crash, neglect, improper repair, improper maintenance, or other abnormal, excessive, or improper use.
    • Corrosion.
    • Improper alteration or installation of components, parts or accessories not originally intended for or compatible with the Product.
    • Failure to perform maintenance or service at appropriate intervals in accordance with the written instructions provided with the Product......"

    https://media.specialized.com/suppor...y-us_ca-en.pdf



    I just checked these two but , same deal ........ nothing extraordinary or lame.
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  54. #54
    Barely in control
    Reputation: Schulze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    2,002
    A 1x hardtail without internal routing is $150 in labor to swap over parts?

    Adonbilivit.

    It's a 30 min job at most.

    You don't even need to remove the front wheel from the fork! Or touch the front brake. Or take the derailleur cable out of the rear derailleur. Hardest part would be the bb if it's bb30 but that's a breeze with the tools right there.

    No shock setup. No brake adjustment or bleed. No messing with anything on the bar. No shortening any cable or hose.

    This is a single beer job. Doable with two allen keys, a bb tool, and some zip ties.

  55. #55
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bigdrunk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,223
    +++1! Working on bikes is not hard, even more so in this situation.

    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    A 1x hardtail without internal routing is $150 in labor to swap over parts?

    Adonbilivit.

    It's a 30 min job at most.

    You don't even need to remove the front wheel from the fork! Or touch the front brake. Or take the derailleur cable out of the rear derailleur. Hardest part would be the bb if it's bb30 but that's a breeze with the tools right there.

    No shock setup. No brake adjustment or bleed. No messing with anything on the bar. No shortening any cable or hose.

    This is a single beer job. Doable with two allen keys, a bb tool, and some zip ties.

  56. #56
    mtbr member
    Reputation: l'oiseau's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    1,200
    Well the problem was obviously that you are riding a BOE in California. This would have never happened in NC.
    Life is too short to ride a bike you don't love.

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    802
    Quote Originally Posted by wideawakejake View Post
    ...than try not to break your frame again.
    This may be difficult to do with a Cannondale. LoL I have broken 3 Cannondale frames and my wheels never leave the ground intentionally!

  58. #58
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    4,319
    I love that this thread keeps returning.

    I do all my work myself and it is decent enough, but not the quality of a skilled professional mechanic.

    $150-200 for a bike build, for excellent quality is totally reasonable. CDale and the original shop came through. The 2nd shop was simply asking for reasonable payment for service.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  59. #59
    Your Best Friend
    Reputation: Silentfoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    5,091
    Quote Originally Posted by klaga View Post
    Dude that sucks!!! I just got a Carbon fat bike frame from this company called Ragnali. They don't offer very many products but a buddy of mine knows the owner and his whole thing is no BS lifetime warranties. They have a no questions asked lifetime warranty that doesn't end when you sell the bike. I haven't crashed yet but it seems pretty legit, they replaced my buddies no questions asked. I am honestly so stoked about it I am posting it all over this site, I hope I'm not driving everyone crazy. I just have wanted to build my own bike for years and hearing all of these warranty horror stories it just was a dream come true to find Ragnali.
    Quit spamming all of the forums with this crap.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    I'm a mountain bike guide in southwest Utah

  60. #60
    Rabid Lana fan
    Reputation: net wurker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    8,793
    My buddy bought a Ragnali frame. It broke in three places while he was taking it out of the box. He called them and they told him to suck wind.
    rOCktoberfest 2015 pt I here
    rOCktoberfest 2015 pt II here

  61. #61
    Trail Gnome
    Reputation: griz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    3,584
    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    The point is their product completely failed within a year of normal use and now I'm out $200 and several weeks of riding. I know it's "standard" for the industry, but doesn't make it right. If they wanted to keep me as a customer, they'd make me whole.
    Learn to wrench on your own bike. I’ve broke/cracked many frames...warranty does not cover labor. Look at it this way, for $200 you have a brand new frame...with a brand new warranty.

  62. #62
    NWS
    NWS is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,464
    Quote Originally Posted by net wurker View Post
    My buddy bought a Ragnali frame. It broke in three places while he was taking it out of the box. He called them and they told him to suck wind.
    Yeah, that's what happens when you buy from a spammer.

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DethWshBkr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    2,137
    Warranty LABOR is not paid for in heating and air conditioning work either.
    Have a failed compressor on a 2 year old unit with a 10 year warranty?
    Be prepared to pay out $400-600 for the labor and associated costs.

    **Unless - you pay for a total coverage warranty which covers labor, through the manufacturer or installer.

    My last two bikes bought, both snapped the frames in 3 months of the maiden rides. It happens.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11-04-2014, 03:43 PM
  2. SOLDOUT… Disappointed!
    By All_talk in forum Motobecane
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: 05-13-2011, 12:39 PM
  3. Replies: 97
    Last Post: 02-22-2011, 05:05 AM
  4. Disappointed with myself
    By Marko G in forum The ReCycle Bin
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 02-05-2011, 10:34 AM
  5. disappointed in Nicolai
    By Dutchdriver in forum Nicolai
    Replies: 53
    Last Post: 02-02-2011, 04:55 PM

Members who have read this thread: 212

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.