Dakar XLT 1.0 vs. Kona Kikapu Deluxe- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Dakar XLT 1.0 vs. Kona Kikapu Deluxe

    I am starting to ride with some friends and am trying to decide on these two bikes. I have rode the XLT and it felt great. (A little spongy, because it was set for a smaller person.) However, I really like the style of the Kikapu and the reputation of Kona. The Kikapu is also a little lighter. Does anyone have anything to add about either bike?


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  2. #2
    Webtoes
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    Well, the Kikapu is more XC oriented and the Dakar XLT is more All-Mountain oriented. Also, there is a difference in travel Kikapu = 4 inches, Dakar = 5 inches. The Kona Dawg is a more comparable to the Dakar XLT and the Dakar XC is more comparable to the Kona Kikapu. As a general rule; Jamis is a better value in the best spec for price area and Kona frames are over built a bit for a little more strength and durabality.
    Webtoes

  3. #3
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    Jamis XLT 1.0 v. Kona Kikapu Deluxe

    I have a Kikapu Deluxe. In the current model year, the bike is specced with lower end componentry than in previous years. Nothing wrong with the current model, just not as fancy as in earlier years. I presume you are interested in an '06 model. It gives pretty good bang for the buck, and I agree with the earlier poster that in designing their cross country bike, Kona went for burly and strong over refined and light, so it isn't the lightest cross country bike out there. That said, it's probably lighter than an all mountain bike like the Jamis. Mine was about 32 pounds stock, with the reflectors, pedals, some dirt, and a water bottle cage. I've ridden it in purely cross country applications and for that it is very good. It has one major weakness, the front fork, which doesn't change it's performance despite tinkering with adjustments. Again, in a purely cross country application, the fork matters, but it's not as critical as it would be to someone dropping and hucking and the like. Overall, I recommend the bike for its intended application, but you'd need to get a new fork to use in anything close to a downhill environment. Best of luck....

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