Cannondale Prophet vs. GT Idrive 4.0 or...- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Cannondale Prophet vs. GT Idrive 4.0 or...

    First of all, I know these bikes are not even close in price, but I am trying to decide if the price difference is worth it. I am just getting back into riding, and everything is changed so much. I plan on doing a lot of riding on trails in the foothills here in northern california. Eventually (this summer), I would like to get to the ski resorts in Tahoe. So here is my question. I could afford the Cannondale prophet 6.0, althought I hate spending that much. How much of a difference am I going to notice (since I am a newbie) between the Profit and something like the GT IDrive 4.0 and something like the IronHorse MKIII.

    I am six foot, 215 pounds and really plan to get into this. The Prophet is going to cost about 1400, the GT is about 850 and the MK III is about 1100. Please let me know what you think...

    Thanks in advance for your knowledge

  2. #2
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    Welcome to the forums

    Let's see if we can't help steer you in the right direction. A quick look at the specs on the 3 bikes and I'd say narrow it down to the Prophet and the MK III. The I-Drive just has too many entry level parts that will inevitably need upgrading. In that you have the budget to buy a better bike, I would suggest spending more up front as you will get more for your money if you buy the better bike now as opposed to upgrading.

    I think the Prophet 6 and MK III Comp are pretty comparable. The DW-Link suspension on the Mark III is highly regarded, but I also feel that the platform shocks available these days have minimized the advantage of some of the patented linkages when it comes to eliminating pedal bob. I'd test ride both bikes and see which one you think feels better and make your decision from there.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  3. #3
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    Thank you. Do you have any opinion on which frame is better?

  4. #4
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    It's a coint toss

    Both frames have their accolades. The Cannondale is hand made in the USA, but is a single pivot suspension. On the pro side, single pivot is very simple and needs little maintenance. On the con side, single pivot bikes have a reputation for pedal bob and brake jack. Newer shock technologies have minimized the issue of pedal bob, but don't address brake jack. The IH has the patented DW link suspension, which again has an excellent reputation for minimizing pedal bob, but the newer shock technologies significantly narrow what advantage the linkage used to have, IMO. It's also more complex and may require more maintenance. Brake jack should not be an issue with this suspension linkage.

    Clear as mud? In all seriousness, I don't think you cold go wrong with either one.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  5. #5
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    Cannondale has lifetime warranties on their frames (to original purchaser). I'm trying to get into a mid-to-high lvl Cannondale hardtail. A lighter bike will be easier to climb with, and I believe the Cannondale is the lighter of these two by quite a margin.

    Also, the stem will fit a Cannondale Lefty shock so you can eventually upgrade to the coolest-looking shock on the market. It gets great reviews, too

    I currently ride an '03 IH HT, and am surprsingly happy with it. Of course, much of the happiness is attributed to the low price I paid for it.

  6. #6
    Bike to the Bone...
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    Quote Originally Posted by RiskEverything
    Cannondale has lifetime warranties on their frames (to original purchaser). I'm trying to get into a mid-to-high lvl Cannondale hardtail. A lighter bike will be easier to climb with, and I believe the Cannondale is the lighter of these two by quite a margin.

    Also, the stem will fit a Cannondale Lefty shock so you can eventually upgrade to the coolest-looking shock on the market. It gets great reviews, too
    .....
    ??? You can't use a standard 1 1/8" stem on a lefty, since it has a different steerer tube (it won't fit). You would need a special stem for it... but maybe I'm not getting your remark and I didn't read anything regarding the stem.. I might be missing something, though...

    I believe IH lightened the MK III frame for 07, but I don't know how much, and I don't know about built quality of the IH (but I believe it to be very good).

    For what it's worth, I think that Cannondale frame will be better built (not sure how much, or how objective this remark is), but they're not easily upgradable (fork/stem stuff). Maybe that feature will help you fight UGI later on, which can be a plus

    The Prophet has been a proven bike (by what I gather), while I haven't seen a Mk III (but I want to ride one )...

  7. #7
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    Changing my question a bit...

    Can anyone think of a better bike to get (given my previous statements regarding use and size) for 1400.00 or less than the Cannondale Prophet 6?

  8. #8
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    Pandora's box

    You just opened it, my friend. Almost every major manufacturer will have an offering in a 5-6" travel bike around $1400-$1500. Which is the "best offering"? All will have their pluses and minuses. Look at last year's leftovers at your LBS if possible, or buying from online sources that have blowouts on leftover stock, or buy from a company that sells product direct to the consumer. The online resources and buying direct from the manufacturer will almost always give you more for your money. The drawback will be the inability to test ride the bike before you buy, and potentially, service after the sale.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

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