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Thread: Blur Sizing

  1. #1
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    Blur Sizing

    So, I'm 5'6" and right in the middle between a small and med Blur. I like shorter stems at 90mm max. Should I go small or medium? The bike will be used for trail-riding, more technical than XC race. Not a hucker or log dropper though, just steep, rougher stuff.

    What are your sizes out there? Thanks.

  2. #2
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    go small...even with the short stem, you will have a more upright aggressive position and shorter wheelbase.

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    Go medium. Santacruz bikes have very short toptubes for their sizing. A Medium Blur has the same toptube length as most manufactures small bikes. If you go small, you will need a 110-120 stem.
    Riding slowly since 1977.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by myitch
    So, I'm 5'6" and right in the middle between a small and med Blur. I like shorter stems at 90mm max. Should I go small or medium? The bike will be used for trail-riding, more technical than XC race. Not a hucker or log dropper though, just steep, rougher stuff.

    What are your sizes out there? Thanks.
    I agree you should get a medium. My wife is 5'6 and she rides a medium with a 100mm stem and loves the fit. A couple friends have small blurs and they are really small. The women riding them are 5'1 and 5'4.

  5. #5
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    I am 5'6" and bought a medium Blur and wound up selling it after one ride. The stand over height was too high for me. I did not feel comfortable in technical situations at all. The problem is the small Blur frame does not differ much from the medium regarding stand over height. I sold the Blur and went with a Spider frame that fit me much better. Try to ride both sizes before you purchase the frame. I wish I did, it would have saved me a lot of time and money.

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    What's your current bike's top tube length?

    Two measurements are pretty important. First the standover on your current bike? Second the top tube? Then do you have long legs or long arms?

    In general I'd go for the bike that has the closer top tube as long as you can straddle it. I agree that SC uses pretty short TT for their sizes so in general I'd say get the medium. Also going from small -> medium you lose 1/2" of standover and gain 1" of TT length, which will definately put you on a shorter stem.

    Personally I'm 6'1" with a 31-32 inseam and the Large I tried was way too small for me. Then again I'm coming from a more race orientated HT.

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    Good job!

    Here's my .02 .......... The shop should spend time with you on both bikes mixing up seatpost styles & stem lengths.

    People say SCB TT's are short all the time, I'd say it really depends on what bike you're coming from and it's measurements vs. the Blur.

    I'm 6'4" and ride a Large Blur with a 105mm fork, 130mm stem, Hi-Rise Easton Carbon bar and a Layback Easton seatpost with the seat square in the middle of the rails. It fits *me* well, *I* like the wheelbase and the high-speed stability and it doesn't look out of proportion.

    So.... Take your time and try many setups on both bikes. Take measurements from your old bike to get a base cockpit configuration and go from there.....
    Note things you didn't like about your old bike, - like maybe you were too "layed out" or "too upright" or you didn't/did like how your bike navigated switchbacks/slow-speed technical stuff.

    Hopefully you have a good, customer oriented shop to go through...... Good Luck!
    Last edited by DMFT; 11-18-2004 at 10:42 AM. Reason: minor change up

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMFT
    People say SCB TT's are short all the time, I'd say it really depends on what bike you're coming from and it's measurements vs. the Blur.
    I beg to differ. It is almost impossible to find a manufacture that uses as short of toptubes for a given size. Santa Cruz uses a 23.3" toptube in their large frames. Specialized, Trek, Fisher, Klein, Titus, Ventana, Turner, Giant and most others use a 23.75"-24.5" toptube for their large frames with most being right at 24".
    Riding slowly since 1977.

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    CDMC - I sell most of those bikes listed and each of those companies have diff. approaches to sizing & spec of their bikes, right out of the box....

    Effective TT comes into play and things like seatpost style and stem length make a huge difference, that's all.....

  10. #10
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    Changing the geometries changes the ride!

    Quote Originally Posted by DMFT
    Effective TT comes into play and things like seatpost style and stem length make a huge difference, that's all.....
    Companies have preferences on how they think a bike should handle and change the frame geometries accordingly. I personally don't like the short chainstays of my old Fisher HT. However the blur is NOT sold as a complete bike so it's up to the buyer to choose the frame that fits their preferences best.

    While you can "fit" people ot a bike by changing the seatpost style/stem length (rise/bar rise) the ride characteristics change. A true fit is one where the lengths/positions are correct and achieves the desired handling characteristics.

    Changing the seatpost to a layback w/seat rail position moves your hips further from the BB and thus your knee position at 3/9 O'clock, not to mention the rear wheel weight bias. For me being further back makes me spin more but forces me to chin down on the handlebars during climbs but allows me to saddle descents, being further forward makes me mash more upright but forces me out of the saddle on descents.

    Adding a longer stem slows the handling and makes the turning arc more shallow (think bus steering wheel vs go-kart wheel).

    That being said I agree with CDMC I don't know of any other company with such a short effective TT length for a given size (however I usually pay attention to L and XL).

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    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by spinjocky
    Companies have preferences on how they think a bike should handle and change the frame geometries accordingly. I personally don't like the short chainstays of my old Fisher HT. However the blur is NOT sold as a complete bike so it's up to the buyer to choose the frame that fits their preferences best.


    - "NOT sold as a complete bike" ????? That's news to me.


    While you can "fit" people ot a bike by changing the seatpost style/stem length (rise/bar rise) the ride characteristics change. A true fit is one where the lengths/positions are correct and achieves the desired handling characteristics.


    - That would make the bike a "Custom", not a stock bike from Trek/SCB/Specialized


    Changing the seatpost to a layback w/seat rail position moves your hips further from the BB and thus your knee position at 3/9 O'clock, not to mention the rear wheel weight bias. For me being further back makes me spin more but forces me to chin down on the handlebars during climbs but allows me to saddle descents, being further forward makes me mash more upright but forces me out of the saddle on descents.

    - We're talking about a layback/off-set at most a 1/2 inch, slide up on the nose of the saddle a tad to get your chin off the bar.
    - You sit while going downhill??? Interesting and to each their own.


    Adding a longer stem slows the handling and makes the turning arc more shallow (think bus steering wheel vs go-kart wheel).


    - Yes, and a short stem feels twitchy at speed.
    - Again we're talking about 10 to 20 mm, nobody is saying go to an "old school" 150 mm to fit a bike that's to small....


    That being said I agree with CDMC I don't know of any other company with such a short effective TT length for a given size (however I usually pay attention to L and XL).

    - To each their own. Any person buying any bike from a shop should get the option to try some diff. setups, we're not talking "radical" changes.
    - That service is extended to any of my shops customers whether they're buying a Hardrock, a Blur or a Fuel etc. etc.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMFT
    - To each their own. Any person buying any bike from a shop should get the option to try some diff. setups, we're not talking "radical" changes.
    - That service is extended to any of my shops customers whether they're buying a Hardrock, a Blur or a Fuel etc. etc.
    Fortunately, for your customers, you care and spend the time to do this. Unfortunately for most people few shops seem to believe this should be done anymore. When I looked for a new mountain bike ($2000 range), I practically had to twist the local shops arms off to get things like tire pressure, suspension and shocks set to my size. Getting them to swap a stem or play with for/aft seat placement was impossible (I am in the SF bay area even).
    Riding slowly since 1977.

  13. #13
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    I Totally Hear Where You're Coming From...

    Quote Originally Posted by CDMC
    Fortunately, for your customers, you care and spend the time to do this. Unfortunately for most people few shops seem to believe this should be done anymore. When I looked for a new mountain bike ($2000 range), I practically had to twist the local shops arms off to get things like tire pressure, suspension and shocks set to my size. Getting them to swap a stem or play with for/aft seat placement was impossible (I am in the SF bay area even).
    - That really sucks to hear & I hear it often here on MTBR and from people locally (to me) in Monterey County about this lack of service trend.

    I mean, how do you build peoples interest in cycling when you put them on something they 1) Don't need or 2) Doesn't fit? - Sooner or later, the customer will figure it out that they've been had and that's just wrong. I happen to like repeat customers and can't figure for the life of me why some shops don't have the same philosophy.

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