Which bike is the best?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Which bike is the best?

    Hey y'all, currently in the hunt for a new mountain bike for myself. I ride some nice off road trails with some pretty big jumps, drops, and full of roots. Right now im riding a street cruiser bike, Diamondback wildwood citi, which had held up so far out in the trails but im looking to upgrade to somethin built for out there. I have narrrowed it down to a couple bikes which all seem really nice, but i just dont have a lot of knowledge of what has the best parts and which ones will give me the best use. Im looking to spend less than $1000 which leaves me with just hardtails. I read around that 29ers are nice to have so im really looking at getting one, but I still wont turn down 26". Couple bikes i like are:

    2012 Jamis Exile Sport

    2012 Diamondback Overdrive Sport

    2012 Specialized HardRock Sport Disc 29

    Jamis Komodo 1


    I would just like to get everyones opinion on each bikes parts and if they are all good bikes. I know any one of these will be better than the one im riding but i would just like to get the best bang for the buck. The one that most interest me is the Jamis Exile, seems like a solid bike, but still be nice to be informed about which one has the best forks and what not. Also im 6' 1'' and wont grow much taller if at all.
    Thanks, Pat.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by FroggerRacing View Post
    Hey y'all, currently in the hunt for a new mountain bike for myself. I ride some nice off road trails with some pretty big jumps, drops, and full of roots. Right now im riding a street cruiser bike, Diamondback wildwood citi, which had held up so far out in the trails but im looking to upgrade to somethin built for out there. I have narrrowed it down to a couple bikes which all seem really nice, but i just dont have a lot of knowledge of what has the best parts and which ones will give me the best use. Im looking to spend less than $1000 which leaves me with just hardtails. I read around that 29ers are nice to have so im really looking at getting one, but I still wont turn down 26". Couple bikes i like are:

    2012 Jamis Exile Sport

    2012 Diamondback Overdrive Sport

    2012 Specialized HardRock Sport Disc 29

    Jamis Komodo 1


    I would just like to get everyones opinion on each bikes parts and if they are all good bikes. I know any one of these will be better than the one im riding but i would just like to get the best bang for the buck. The one that most interest me is the Jamis Exile, seems like a solid bike, but still be nice to be informed about which one has the best forks and what not. Also im 6' 1'' and wont grow much taller if at all.
    Thanks, Pat.

    Ride as many as you can. Buy the one that fits and feels the best.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noobi-Wan Kenobi View Post
    Ride as many as you can. Buy the one that fits and feels the best.
    + 1

    The Exile or Hardrock would be my choice for that price range.
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  4. #4
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    In my head I am singing "one of these things is not like the others, some of these things are kind of the same..."

    THe Jamis Komodo is a dirt jump bike and the other three are cross country bikes. It is likely that if you want to do long cross country rides with the Komodo it will not be as comfortable or lightweight as the other three. It is likely that if you want to ride one of the other three bikes off your cousin's roof it will snap and slam you to the ground, but the Komodo will allow a graceful heel-toe landing and high fives all around.

    All three of the XC bikes look good. Shop based on the 'fit' of the bikes (how comfortable you are riding them), and how much you like dealing with the shops where they are sold. Just so you know, it is likely all three of those bikes were made in the same factory in China and the differences are maerely superficial.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by TobyNobody View Post
    In my head I am singing "one of these things is not like the others, some of these things are kind of the same..."

    THe Jamis Komodo is a dirt jump bike and the other three are cross country bikes. It is likely that if you want to do long cross country rides with the Komodo it will not be as comfortable or lightweight as the other three. It is likely that if you want to ride one of the other three bikes off your cousin's roof it will snap and slam you to the ground, but the Komodo will allow a graceful heel-toe landing and high fives all around.

    All three of the XC bikes look good. Shop based on the 'fit' of the bikes (how comfortable you are riding them), and how much you like dealing with the shops where they are sold. Just so you know, it is likely all three of those bikes were made in the same factory in China and the differences are maerely superficial.
    I am mainly looking at the XC bikes but how do you think the Komodo is? Is it have better parts for the jumps and handle better in the trails? Im just not sure if I will like the single gear up front if it will allow a low enuff ratio for the hills we have. Guess best thing I should do is to just go test ride one and see for myself.

    So as for the other bikes they are all about the same?

  6. #6
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    if your plans are to hit as many of those jumps as you can, shy away from all of these bikes and look for a used AM HT that hasn't been beat to hell. If you are going to stay away form the jumps the they'll be OK. BTW, what kind of "jumps" are we talking about here?

    You need to start reading and doing some more research before you make a decision. You also need to test ride all of the bikes that you are considering. If you had a good understanding of what you were looking for, test riding might not be as important. But, in your situation it is vitally important.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnigro View Post
    if your plans are to hit as many of those jumps as you can, shy away from all of these bikes and look for a used AM HT that hasn't been beat to hell. If you are going to stay away form the jumps the they'll be OK. BTW, what kind of "jumps" are we talking about here?

    You need to start reading and doing some more research before you make a decision. You also need to test ride all of the bikes that you are considering. If you had a good understanding of what you were looking for, test riding might not be as important. But, in your situation it is vitally important.
    What exactly is a AM HT? These jumps are anything big, just a couple table tops and few gap jumps. Nothing is really big.

    I have looked around at everything but havent seen much. I imagine if my current bike is holding up to this any of these bikes will have no problem with these trails.

  8. #8
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    an AM HT or all mountain hard tail is just a hard tail frame that is built for more abuse. it generally has slacker head tube angles to better handle fast descents and be less twitchy. they are also designed to run longer travel forks, like 140mm or longer. I recommended this due to your size and the fact that you mentioned jumping with the bike. better to get a bike that is a closer fit for how you intend to ride it.

    I am not saying that a XC bike will fall to pieces if you hit a jump with it. I'm just saying that they were/are not built to do that on a regular basis. it could very well be that your current bike frame is built strong enough for what you are doing. the problem really starts when you get into the mid-level to high-level bikes, they begin to change in terms of their design. Maybe not at the $1000 price point, but mtb companies focus on cutting weight from their XC bikes which means that they aren't going to hold up to the rigors of taking drops and jumps on a regular basis. Again, most of this probably does not apply to this price point. I'm just trying to help educate you about it since you're looking to spend $1k on a new bike.

    a slacker bike would probably be more fun though, based on what you mentioned earlier. just make sure that you test ride the bikes. even if it is only a parking lot test. fit is the most important factor.

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the clearification! How can I tell a bike is an AM HT and not a XC HT?

    I understand what you are saying on the bike design. What is a slacker bike? A bike with single gear up front?

  10. #10
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    slacker angles means instead of a more upright front end, it has a more laid back front end. it helps when bombing downhill but makes the bike react slower in tight, twisty sections.

    the way you can tell about what a bike was designed for is to read about it on the reviews section and on the manufacturers' web site.

    no offense but it sounds like you'd be best off visiting bike shops and test ride the bikes in your price range. find the one that fits you best.

  11. #11
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    Try a gt avalanche. I treat my 06 like an AM ht and it doesn't skip a beat and I'm 215.
    or for 29er a karakoram
    Sent from my Nexus S 4G using Tapatalk
    Last edited by ricky916; 12-07-2011 at 01:35 PM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnigro View Post
    slacker angles means instead of a more upright front end, it has a more laid back front end. it helps when bombing downhill but makes the bike react slower in tight, twisty sections.

    the way you can tell about what a bike was designed for is to read about it on the reviews section and on the manufacturers' web site.

    no offense but it sounds like you'd be best off visiting bike shops and test ride the bikes in your price range. find the one that fits you best.
    So would you say the Komodos is more of a slacker bike than the Exile?

    I have looked at a few bikes and its parts, just not positive on what parts are that good. I do think that any of these bikes are better than the cruiser bike I am using.

    On jamis website it claims the Exile is a trail xc which does it mean it would be good in the trails and some jumps? Its all flow jumps, nothing is to flat hard surfaces.

    I will test ride a few bikes before i make any desisions on which one I get.

  13. #13
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    Would yall say this would be a good jump bike? Jamis Xam 1

  14. #14
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    you can go to local shop and try all

  15. #15
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    Bikes designed for dirt jumping are bikes like the Giant STP
    XC bikes are good at riding up hills and riding long distances off road (and even not too bad on the road with suitable tyres)
    AM bikes are kind of and "all rounder" where they are pretty good at a bit of everything, tougher than an XC bike but not as tough as a DH bike

    For head angles etc you need to look at the bike GEOMETRY numbers. A bike with a head angle of 69 degrees is slacker than a bike with a head angle of 71 degrees for example. Yes the difference is quite small but does make a difference in how the bike handles.
    Another indication that you're buying an AM bike and not an XC bike is if the fork has more than 100mm of travel, and particularly if it has more than 120mm these days I guess.

    Don't get an AM bike if you like to go on long fast trail ridies and enjoy riding up hills. Don't get an AM bike if all you want to do is dirt jumping and riding around your local streets with mates or at skate parks...in that case you're better off looking at DJ bikes (like the Giant STP) which have only 100mm travel but they are burlier, they have really low seats (kind of like bmxish) and designed specifically for that purpose.
    Do look at an AM bikes if you think you want a bike to do a bit of everything and you want it to be stronger (but heavier) than a XC bike.

  16. #16
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    The specialized!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by FroggerRacing View Post
    Would yall say this would be a good jump bike? Jamis Xam 1
    I'm not sure that it would make a good dirt jumper but that isn't my forte. It would make a very good all-round (AM) bike. Check out the reviews on them on this site.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ducktape View Post
    Bikes designed for dirt jumping are bikes like the Giant STP
    XC bikes are good at riding up hills and riding long distances off road (and even not too bad on the road with suitable tyres)
    AM bikes are kind of and "all rounder" where they are pretty good at a bit of everything, tougher than an XC bike but not as tough as a DH bike

    For head angles etc you need to look at the bike GEOMETRY numbers. A bike with a head angle of 69 degrees is slacker than a bike with a head angle of 71 degrees for example. Yes the difference is quite small but does make a difference in how the bike handles.
    Another indication that you're buying an AM bike and not an XC bike is if the fork has more than 100mm of travel, and particularly if it has more than 120mm these days I guess.

    Don't get an AM bike if you like to go on long fast trail ridies and enjoy riding up hills. Don't get an AM bike if all you want to do is dirt jumping and riding around your local streets with mates or at skate parks...in that case you're better off looking at DJ bikes (like the Giant STP) which have only 100mm travel but they are burlier, they have really low seats (kind of like bmxish) and designed specifically for that purpose.
    Do look at an AM bikes if you think you want a bike to do a bit of everything and you want it to be stronger (but heavier) than a XC bike.
    Thank you! That cleared a lot up

  19. #19
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    Glad to help.

    I've had bikes such as Specialized Hardrock (xc ht), Giant Alias (xc ht), Giant Trance (xc dually), Orange 222 (DH bike), Giant STP (dirt jumper)

    I knew I could use the STP to try DH and do XC type riding (with a long seat post) because the TT length was similar to the trance, but it just wasn't that idea for XC type rides, I was too chicken to dirt jump and not much good at DH. Should have stuck with an XC bike personally.

    Sometimes the rider you'd like to be is different to the rider you are. But it's a passion, if you choose the wrong bike you can chalk it up as experience anyway! So try not to plan too much into the future I guess.

  20. #20
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    I don't understand where specialized gets off charging almost a grand for an entry level hardtail. When i bought a rockhopper it was $550 and that was only 6 years ago. I cannot believe that costs went up almost $400 to put out that bike.

    OP, it isn't exactly what you had planned but look at the Jamis 650b models on closeout. Id also look for other full suspension bikes that are on closeout sale. Another option is to bump your budget about $200 and get a Ragley Piglet frame built around a 130mm fork and decent wheels. You can find Eastons on Pricepoint for a steal and try to find good deals on the rest of the components either new takeoff or used. I could build a bike for about $1200 and change that is spec'd way better than what most new HT are selling for at $1500. If you have the skills or a friend that does, that is what is do. Also check out On-One, they have some damn good prices and build kit packages.

  21. #21
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    I think the Jamis is by far the best bike you listed. It is a quality brand and good bang for your buck. A Jamis of equal price will come with better components and frame quality than a Specialized or Trek or Cannondale.

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  23. #23
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    Sette Razzo, but $1100. No crap parts. 26 pounds.



    Frame
    Full 7005 double butted aluminum. Tig welded

    Size(s)
    16", 18", 20", 22"

    Fork
    RockShox Reba RL 80mm

    Shifters
    SRAM X7 9 speed

    Front Derailleur
    SRAM X7

    Rear Derailleur
    SRAM X9 9 speed

    Shifter Cable/Housing
    Jagwire

    Brake Levers
    Avid Elixir CR

    Front Brake
    Avid Elixr CR hydraulic disc with 160mm rotor

    Rear Brake
    Avid Elixr CR hydraulic disc with 160mm rotor

    Crankset
    Truvativ Stylo 3.3 44-32-22 175mm all sizes

    Bottom Bracket
    Truvativ Giga X Pipe

    Cassette
    Shimano CS-HG61-9 Shimano 29er specific 12-36T

    Chain
    Sram PC-951

    Headset
    FSA Orbit XLII 1 1/8 integrated sealed bearing

    Handlebar
    Sette XLR 31.8mm 660mm wide 20mm rise

    Grips/Tape
    Sette Type S Lock On, black w/ black clamps

    Stem
    Sette Edge 31.8mm (16"/90mm, 18"/100mm, 20"/110mm, 22"/120mm)

    Saddle
    Sette Rez w/cromo rails

    Seatpost
    Sette APX lightweight alloy 27.2

    Wheelset
    Mavic 719 Disc Rims/Shimano Deore 29er Hubs/14-15g stainless steel spoke and alloy nipples
    Pedals Shimano PD-M505

    Front Tire
    Kenda Small Block Eight 29 x 2.1 folding bead

    Rear Tire
    Kenda Small Block Eight 29 x 2.1 folding bead

    Color(s)
    Grey with white accents

    Warranty
    5 Years

    Weight
    26.3 pounds (without pedals, 18")

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