Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    4

    Best Bike Lock/Chain System??

    i couldnt find any threads about this, so i figured it start one. im a beginning mountain biker, just bought a cannondale F400, and really want to protect it as well as possible!

    can anyone give me any starting suggestions on what type of lock/chain to get? i obviously want maximum secuirty, but it would also be nice if the thing didnt weigh a ton.

    ive seen three main types so far:

    1) the wound fiber rope/cable style
    this one seems nice, but its a little long and annoying. id imagine its light though and seems to have protection against bolt cutters

    2) the shackle style
    this seems pretty damn beefy, but also heavy

    3) the super large chain
    ive seen some bike messanger type kids riding around with this huge chain wrapped in material around their shoulders. these look beefy also, but look extremely heavy

    anyways, i think you know what im getting at... i just bought a bike and am looking for a secure, versitile, and not-too-heavy bike lock .

    any suggestions??

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: robinmiller's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    461
    The fact is, there are a lot of _professional_ bike thieves out there. It's good business, especially if you're a junkie.

    Unfortunately, this means that NO lock is particularly safe. If you leave any bike (and this applies x10 to a flashy bike like a brand new Cannondale) unattended in an urban area, it'll get stolen eventually.


    That said, forget about the cable locks. They can be cut in a matter of seconds. A really beefy U-lock is decent, such as a Kryptonite New York lock. The giant chains are decent too. Make sure you lock the bike to something sturdy as well. If you use your $150 lock to attach your bike to a sign post, you might as well not use a lock at all. But, leave the bike out for long enough, and it'll get stolen. Even the best locks aren't as good as the best thieves.


    The truth is that when you start getting into nicer bikes, you simply can't 'park' them outside anymore.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: robinmiller's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    461
    Incidentally, i was on the east side (of manhattan) a couple days ago, and ended up walking about 25 blocks up 2nd ave with my girlfriend looking for a restaurant. It was around 4 pm and most of the delivery bikes were chained up to sign posts outside the restaurants. Damn! About half were the usual crap, rusty old walmart bikes and the like, but i also saw a lot of really nice bikes. Carbon fiber frames, lots of Cannondales, and one totally tricked out but old skool XC racer with Cadex frame, blue anodized parts, a manitou 3, and... rusty steel wheels they were all covered in tape, but you could usually tell what they were. I'll bet that all those high end bikes converted to delivery bikes were bought from pawn shops or other shady sources, and were stolen from their original owners.
    Last edited by robinmiller; 07-15-2005 at 07:26 AM.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    4
    cool thanks for the info. the kryptonite new york U lock looks like the maximum security at not TOO heavy of a weight. the only thing about U locks is that they seem like they might be hard to get around certain area... are they only meant for pick racks? anyone had any problems getting them around certain objects?

    also, does anyone know of a good article or FAQ about bike theft? with to-do's and not-to-do's???

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: robinmiller's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    461
    Quote Originally Posted by evangelion

    also, does anyone know of a good article or FAQ about bike theft? with to-do's and not-to-do's???
    Not sure about an article, but the basics are:

    Leave your bike in a highly visible place

    Lock it though a frame tube and the rear wheel (and the front wheel too if you can get it on there, otherwise take it with you) to an immovable object. Flimsy metal signposts can be easily cut or lifted out. Trees can be cut down in minutes. Go for tougher stuff like iron gates (common in here in New York) or lamp posts if you have a chain.

    Don't leave the bike out in the same place regularly



    However, none of this is really going to make your bike safe, it just might reduce the chances of theft a bit. Components like the seatpost/saddle, handlebars with shifters, stem, and brake levers, etc, can and will be removed from the bike even if the bike is not taken.

    What it boils down to is, if you care about your bike at all, never leave it outside. If you consider the bike to be disposable, then get a good lock and follow the rules above.


    Watch this video: http://neistat.com/pages/video_holdi...ef_holding.htm

Similar Threads

  1. WalMart bike kicked my Ibis's ass!!
    By Itripper in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 96
    Last Post: 03-08-2006, 02:38 PM
  2. Mountain bike jargon/ lingo
    By bstguitarist in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 05-26-2005, 12:02 PM
  3. Forks, Frames and Five Hundred Dollars.
    By AdamOn6thStreet in forum Clydesdales/Tall Riders
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 02-25-2005, 10:10 PM
  4. If you need to know this.
    By KevinVokeyJ24 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 12-24-2004, 09:40 AM
  5. Lance's Austin "29er" revealed
    By ncj01 in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-28-2004, 08:14 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.