29ers will take over as the "standard" wheel size...- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: js_paddle07's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    243

    29ers will take over as the "standard" wheel size...

    I have a friend who is bike shopping for himself and his fiance. They will be riding the majority of the time on pavement (urban, around town type of riding). They want to try some trail riding but let's say it will be 90/10 street to trail riding. He went to a LBS and was told that he needs a 29er (Giant Talon), and his fiance needs the Giant Rainier.

    He asked for my two cents, so I told him that I saw no justification for getting a 29er if he is riding primarily pavement and bike paths. Do you agree?

    He was offered advice from another friend who said that he and his fiance should both opt for the Talon 29er. He said that in a few years, 29ers will take over the 26" wheel. Does anyone see that happening???
    Whenever I see an adult on a bicycle, I have hope for the human race. ~ H.G. Wells

  2. #2
    mbtr member
    Reputation: scottzg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    5,318
    They'll probably take over as the dominant wheel size for taller intermediate XC riders.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  3. #3
    bi-winning
    Reputation: rkj__'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,108
    The 29" wheel size will have a great selection of hybrid/road/touring tires available to fit, if the bike is being used mostly on paved surfaces.

    The trend I see right now, is that the popularity of 29ers is still increasing. Where that increase will stop, is hard to say.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    876
    I definitely disagree with your assessment that there is no reason to go 29er for primarily bike paths and pavement. Quite the reverse, I see the higher final gearing of a 29er as being quite beneficial on bike paths and pavement. Also, any of the possible downsides of a 29er will be minimized or even non-existent on bike paths and pavement.

    This all assumes they want mountain bikes to also do some trail riding. If they are going to ONLY do bike paths and pavement, a flat bar road bike with somewhat fatter tires and an upright stance is what I would recommend. They need to be honest with themselves about their likely use.

    David B.

  5. #5
    dwt
    dwt is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dwt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    4,169
    Quote Originally Posted by js_paddle07
    He asked for my two cents, so I told him that I saw no justification for getting a 29er if he is riding primarily pavement and bike paths. Do you agree?
    No. For those purposes, they should also consider 700mm hybrid.

    He was offered advice from another friend who said that he and his fiance should both opt for the Talon 29er. He said that in a few years, 29ers will take over the 26" wheel. Does anyone see that happening???
    No. They still have limits on the trails, despite the fad (weight and maneuverability to name two).

    It will be a cold day in hell when 29 l "takes over" 26. It will be a chilly day in hell if they reach 50%.
    Last edited by dwt; 05-24-2010 at 07:09 PM.
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fix the Spade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,749
    Quote Originally Posted by js_paddle07
    He asked for my two cents, so I told him that I saw no justification for getting a 29er if he is riding primarily pavement and bike paths. Do you agree?
    Actually no, for paths and pavement a 29er will be better.

    29ers lose out when you're turning and accelerating all the time, which is (partly) why they aren't winning world cups and why they're rare here in the twisty rocky north of England. In isolation they feel fine (great even) but over the course of a day's riding the guy on the 29er always ends up at the back, all those tight flicky turns add up.

    But for straight not especially bumpy terrain a 29in wheel is better than 26, for them a 700c hybrid would work too.

    As for taking over, I don't think so. Unless 29ers start winning every race going they aren't going to become the standard fit across the board. I expect that we will end up with a situation like BMX and dirt jumpers, you pick your wheel size and it's more about rider preference than actual technical advantages. One size fits all was/is never going to work for everyone and every ride.

  7. #7
    bi-winning
    Reputation: rkj__'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,108
    Quote Originally Posted by Fix the Spade
    over the course of a day's riding the guy on the 29er always ends up at the back, all those tight flicky turns add up.
    If a rider ends up at the back, it's not because of his or her wheel size.

    At the 8 and 24 hour races I attend, there are some people doing very well (podium positions) on 29ers.


    I don't believe that 29ers will totally "take over" though.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  8. #8
    GAME ON!
    Reputation: saturnine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    4,964
    29ers have taken over southern ontario. single speed, rigid, 29ers are the ride of choice. not for me, though.
    Last edited by saturnine; 05-25-2010 at 04:04 AM.

  9. #9
    Trail Junkie
    Reputation: dubdryver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,203
    I don't think 29ers are in a position to "take over" and make 26ers obsolete. The biggest realm where they are handicapped is AM/DH. The big wheel limits the amount of travel in needed in big suspensions. 29ers have an edge on pure XC racing due to the fact that it's mostly fire road courses. That isn't really the case here though.

    29er/700c for their application would be the most viable, in that the terrain will mostly be road and path. Might as well take advantage of the big wheel to lessen rolling resistance and increase roll over ability.

  10. #10
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,198
    29ers are so last year , the 32er will rule .

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,116
    I was up at the trail center north of my town on a recent Saturday. Saw two new riders (seats too low, in running shoes) on 29ers. Certainly the first time I had ever seen that.
    "Bikes aren't fast--people are fast. Bikes are overpriced. It's an important distinction."---BikeSnob NYC

  12. #12
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    13,652
    He asked for my two cents, so I told him that I saw no justification for getting a 29er if he is riding primarily pavement and bike paths. Do you agree?
    No


    He said that in a few years, 29ers will take over the 26" wheel. Does anyone see that happening???
    No
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: js_paddle07's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    243
    Well...I stand corrected then. I just thought it was crazy for him to get a heavy 29er with disc brakes, when it will very rarely see dirt. It seems like there are better options.
    Whenever I see an adult on a bicycle, I have hope for the human race. ~ H.G. Wells

  14. #14
    dwt
    dwt is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dwt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    4,169
    Quote Originally Posted by js_paddle07
    Well...I stand corrected then. I just thought it was crazy for him to get a heavy 29er with disc brakes, when it will very rarely see dirt. It seems like there are better options.
    You left out the disc brakes in your original post. You are correct that would be overkill in all ways for his intended use. He needs a 700c hybrid with rim brakes for this type of riding, not a 29'er mtn bike.
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  15. #15
    offroader
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    2,190
    I really hope 29ers don't take over. Then I won't be the only cool guy on the trail with my 29er single speed while everyone else is riding a 26er full suspension. Besides, it's funny to see noob riders on 29er's .

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boomn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    9,979
    Quote Originally Posted by dubdryver
    I don't think 29ers are in a position to "take over" and make 26ers obsolete. The biggest realm where they are handicapped is AM/DH. The big wheel limits the amount of travel in needed in big suspensions. 29ers have an edge on pure XC racing due to the fact that it's mostly fire road courses. That isn't really the case here though.

    29er/700c for their application would be the most viable, in that the terrain will mostly be road and path. Might as well take advantage of the big wheel to lessen rolling resistance and increase roll over ability.
    not to be offensive, but that sounds like the kinds of things people say when they're trying to troll.

    I bought a 29er specifically because it felt better, rode smoother and was more capable on my rocky, chunky trails. As for 29er AM bikes, these have already been out there and proven for a while. Lenz Sport has been making very capable 5" and 6" FS bikes for a couple years and now Niner and Intense are making AM bikes. That market isn't huge yet, but it is established enough that designers are already setting their sites on DH 29ers

    I doubt 29ers will ever take over the market completely, but I think the segment will continue to grow for a while

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    2,978

    bah, 650c will take over

    For tall riders and rigid frame riders 29ers should be first on their list to consider.

    I'm only 5'8", 29ers just don't 'fit' me and with my size 10.5 feet I can buzz my toes with the front wheel on all the 29ers (5 or 6) I've ridden. Oddly while out on the trail I've never hit my toes but do it in the parking lot.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    52
    Where I live, in Belgium, 29ers are rare. Most common type of bikes here are 26" hardtails for XC and light trail riding (there are lots of FS in the south, but in the north not really) and all I see is 26". So I don't think 29ers will take over, even if that's most likely to happen on XC hardtails. There isn't much interest in 29ers here. Hardly any, actually.

    P.S. The XC courses in Europe are too technical and have too much sharp and tight corners for a 29" to be preferable over a 26" as I read in a mtb magazine.

  19. #19
    All 26.5" all the time!
    Reputation: Zanetti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,855
    Quote Originally Posted by js_paddle07
    He was offered advice from another friend who said that he and his fiance should both opt for the Talon 29er. He said that in a few years, 29ers will take over the 26" wheel. Does anyone see that happening???

    Think of the millions upon millions of 26" wheeled bikes that have been sold over the years. Then think of all the 26" sized frames/forks/rims/tires...etc and the obscene amount of money tied up in the tooling to produce all that.

    The 26" wheel will be with us for the rest of our lives. It still works great for the majority of riders out there.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    8
    in my place, Thailand still ride 26" mtb

    I saw 29er mtb in Thailand only 4-5 bikes , including me

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    21
    Something else to consider perhaps is the 29ers ability to run a set of 700c road rims and tyres without compromising geometry, pedal clearance and standover height too significantly (after all a 29er wheel is essentially only a 700c rim with fatties).

    Makes for an easy fix between a flat bar hybrid and a trail bike without having to swap tyres everytime you want to hit the trails or run knobblies on the sealed stuff.
    Not necessarily a straight up purchase but a handy option to have down the track.

  22. #22
    banned
    Reputation: Steeljaws's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    266
    29'rs will take over when hardtails, non-suspension forks, steel and aluminum frame materials, and Walmart & Sears bikes are no longer made or offered....dumbazz thread, no disrespect intended js.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    260
    Last weekend my Trek Remedy was down for repairs so I borrowed a Gary Fisher HiFi 29 and deliberately tested it on the trails I'm used to.
    I was amazed.
    To my surprise the bike felt so confidence inspiring on the descents, despite the xc oriented geo, even compared to my Remedy. Cornering wasn't a problem at all and I never felt I was being held back because of big wheel issues. Climbing was much easier but that's to expected.
    I know those two models are not the same and I'm not comparing. I was just trying an xc oriented 29er on my regular "AM" ride and it felt very nice. My next AM bike will probably have 29 wheels.
    Taking over? I don't know....I think that mountain biking evolved mostly around 26" wheels so for many riders a 29er is regarded as the "exception". Could it have been the other way around? Perhaps...

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.