An 07 Rockhopper deal?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    An 07 Rockhopper deal?

    Went to the LBS today to look at the 07 Rockhopper which I have my heart set on, it's up for $470 but when I was talking about making a deal the guy said he'd sell me an 07 Rockhopper Disk for $540 (10% off the $600 price tag). Now I really didn't wanna spend more than the $470 but it's only a matter of $70, what do you think??

  2. #2
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    The brakes seem to be the only difference between the two. If you ride in wet and muddy conditions, it would probably be worth it. But if your more of a fair weather rider or just live in a dry part of the world...the disc brake upgrade probably isn't worth it. They're not really that nice of a disc brake...plus they're center-lock rotors and hubs which limits your future choices (though there are adapters for those now).

  3. #3
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    Get the one with the disc brake. The thing is, you are already considering disc brakes. So, you need it or not, it will be in your mind all the time you will be riding the V-brake version. Also, upgrading the base Rockhopper to disc brake will take much more than $70.....You are talking about a new wheel (at least hubs), and disc brakes.....A decent set of disc Brakes (say AVID BB7s will cost you around $130 to $150....So, you are probably talking about a $300 upgrade....

    Now, if you got the Disc version, you could ride the bike for a while to see how your brakes perform. and if you dont like them....then you can buy a set of Avid BB7 calipers (it would not cost you that much).....and run it with your denter lock rotors....Lots of people talk about the the center lock rotors being thinner than the other rotors....but I have not noticed any difference on my bike....

    Also, disc brake will probably give you more flexibility and control.....and it may help you grow as a biker... So, you may not feel that you need it for what you do at present, but that may change soon..

    buy the way, no matter which one you decide to buy, rockhopper is a very versatile bike.....have fun........and post some pictures...
    Success is a lousy teacher. It seduces smart people into thinking they can't lose. - Bill Gates

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the feedback, I'm leaning towards the Disc version, my one concern is that I read somewhere on here that the 07 Rockhopper Disk model has an issue with upgrading the disk components, such as you have to stick with shimano components in regards to rim, hub, and calipers. Is this the case or would I be able to swap in and out any components I like? thanks for the help

  5. #5
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    You are correct-to a point

    Quote Originally Posted by Diesel Weasel
    Thanks for the feedback, I'm leaning towards the Disc version, my one concern is that I read somewhere on here that the 07 Rockhopper Disk model has an issue with upgrading the disk components, such as you have to stick with shimano components in regards to rim, hub, and calipers. Is this the case or would I be able to swap in and out any components I like? thanks for the help
    the wheelset taht comes with the bike accepts Shimano's "centerlock" disc hubs. This means that if you are going to upgrade the disc brakes, you need to go with shimano rotors, or use a "centerlock to ISO mount adapitor". This will allow you to use the more standardized ISO mounted disc rotors. Keep in mind this only applies to the rotors, and not the brake calipers. You can use any brake caliper on the bike, so long as the rotors are compatible with them, and are mountable via centerlock or the aforementioned adaptor.

    Confused yet? My guess is yes, but I would not hesitate to recommend buying the disc version, regardless of the Shimano centerlock rotor issue. Bottom line, there are many work arounds if you choose to upgrade. For now, buy the bike and ride it as is. Chances are it will be just fine as is. If not, you can indeed upgrade as noted.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  6. #6
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    Bob explained the options pretty well.

    here is a simplified (or is it) version of what could be done.....

    Option one: No cost
    Ride the disc brake as it is. It may be all that you need.

    Option two: Cost around $80. (you may be able to sale the calipers on ebay and recover some money)
    Keep the center lock rotors and buy a better disc brake caliper....BB5s would do the job...you can get a st of BB5s from Pricepoint.com for around $80....you can even get some cash back by selling the disc rotors on eBay. if you want to keep the center lock rotors.

    Option three: cost $80 + $20 (and you can off load your existing disc brakes on ebay)
    If you decide to use a complete BB5 set up (Caliper and rotors) you have to get the front and rear brakes and then get the 6-bolt adaptor for the center-lock specific hub. Cause, Avid and most other Disc brake rotors are 6-bolt compitable. You can get the adaptors for $20-$30.....eBay, Price point and some other online stores would be the places to find the adaptor...

    Option Four: $89 + $80 - $80 (or $100)
    - You can get a new set of wheels for $89. This is a great wheel for this price - strong, and fairly light. (http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...+Wheelset.aspx)
    - a set of BB5 disc brakes for $80
    - and then sale your disc brake set and wheels on ebay. Based on your selling skills and market (time of the year etc), you can probably get around $80.....may be more...

    now, in terms of strength and efficiency (my personal opinion) following would be my order of preference:

    First Choice: Option Four - New wheels new brakes (and you dont have to do it right away, you can wait a few months to complete this project.)

    Second Choice: Option Three - New Brake set with 6-bolt adaptor

    Third Choice: Option Two - Existing rotors and BB5 disc calipers.

    Fourth Choice: Option One - Leave it just the way it is.

    Personally, If I had a limited budget and were not riding very aggressively, I would just stay with your current set up....at least for a few months or for a season...

    hope it makes sense to you...good luck...
    Success is a lousy teacher. It seduces smart people into thinking they can't lose. - Bill Gates

  7. #7
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    Thank you very much, that did indeed clear up everything that I needed to know, hopefully i'll be making my purchase within the next couple of weeks (it's actually snowing today here in New England), thank you once again you were both a great help.

  8. #8
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    get the discs!! especially if you have any heft to yourself. even if they aren't the best disc brakes, they're better than v brakes. i bet by the time you really start thinking about upgrading brakes, wheels, fork, etc...you'll be looking and new bikes anyway. that's how it happened for me. i bought an '05 rockhopper comp disc thinking that i'd spend a little more than the base rockhopper b/c i'd ride this bike forever. yeah right. a little over a year later and she's got a FS sibling.
    "Pops trippin', he want me to ask for my bike back. You know I wouldn't trip."

  9. #9
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    Not even close to true

    Quote Originally Posted by biggsmoothe
    get the discs!! especially if you have any heft to yourself. even if they aren't the best disc brakes, they're better than v brakes.
    While I'm a big fan of Disc brakes, this statement couldn't be any further from the truth. Good V-Brakes will WAY outperform bad Disc brakes. I'm not saying the V-brakes on the standard rockhopper are all that great (Tektro is at least better than Pro-Max) but my personal and first hand bike shop experience with the low end Shimano mechanical Disc brakes are pretty weak. However...given the Avid BB5 upgrade, then I would go Disc.

  10. #10
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    Well i'm 5'10'' 150lbs so weight isn't the deciding factory, it's money wise, the $470 Rockhopper base model is at the very top of my budget, I really don't want to cross the $500 mark but for only $70 it's almost hard not to, I am however new to the MTB sport so I'm not sure if i would notice the difference, it's a tough one...

  11. #11
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    D.W.- I am a newbie to mountain biking, and am in the same "boat" as you.

    I discussed disc brakes vs. V brakes with LBS owner yesterday. He mentioned that V brakes take more hand grip force to produce the stopping or deceleration power to the brakes, and that disc brakes are easier to manage.

    Someone- correct me if I'm wrong, but it seems that if you'll be doing alot of downhilling, the disc brakes would be more efficient(?).

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