What's this seal for on my fork? And other new bike arrival questions/observations.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    What's this seal for on my fork? And other new bike arrival questions/observations.

    Vitus Sentier came in, took less than 2 weeks. Pretty good. I've heard many folks talk about how they wouldn't want to order online cuz they wouldn't trust the assembly of what they get, how you should take it to a bike shop for professional assembly just to be sure it's all good to go. I gotta say I had no issues whatsoever. THe way it was packaged made it incredibly quick and easy to throw together. I checked out every bolt and screw and component and spoke and nothing was loose. Always a chance something was overtorqued i guess, but no real way to tell that unless i go trying to loosen shit.

    I have no had an opportunity to test out the gearing and make sure that's all adjusted correctly, hopefully that doesnt require any effort on my part. Just screwin around with it in the house, it seems to be G2G, but ill find out when weather finally gives me a gift.

    All that said, i did have a couple questions. First off, what is this rubber seal that was just hanging out in the middle of my fork?

    It's that blue seal in the pic there. Does it need to move up, should it be placed on the bottom, is it meant to stay there for some reason? It was right where the pic shows out of the box.


    Question 2, also fork related, should the rebound adjustment knob be so tight I would need a wrench to get it goin? I attempted to play with it a bit just with my fingers and it was not budging either direction. I would figure it shouldn't be that tight, but what do i know.

    Question 3, what do I use on a valve like this? I have never dealt with such a valve, only ever dealt with the standard ones you find on dept store bikes. Do they make pumps that can hit these up or will I need to purchase some sort of attachment?



    The pedals seem surprisingly junky to me. I must admit previously when i read people go on about replacing pedals I would always scoff at it, assumed it was some bike nerd/snob type of thing to do. Afterall, Ive ridden nothing but junker dept store "mountain" bikes and i never once had any issue with pedals in the slightest. They never broke no matter how much i abused the bike, never had issues with foot slipping as the grip/teeth/whatever you wanna call it on em were always sufficient.

    The pedals that came with this have seemingly nearly no "teeth" to em at all. They don't seem to compare at all to what the thriftstore mongoose monstrosity i most recently was riding had, or the random junker before that. Maybe ill be proven wrong when i get a chance to hit trails hard, but ill be surprised. Feel like if my shoe is wet or muddy or perhaps even covered in loose dust/dirt, my feet are likely to slip a bit.

    These 2.6 tires look HUGE! Again, i've only messed with your standard dept store bike, so never got up close and personal with something legit. These things were kinda surprising taking em out of the box. Looks fun though.
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    What's this seal for on my fork? And other new bike arrival questions/observations.-img_20200214_224506644.jpg  


  2. #2
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    1. Is the sag indicator. Its used to measure your suspension "sag" with you on the bike. Which is typically 20 to 30% of your total fork travel.

    2. It should not be that tight. The rebound knob should fairly easy to turn with a light click with each turn.

    3. You would use a pump that is Presta compatible. Most pumps should be Presta and Schrader compatible. If your pump is not compatible...you can go to your local bike shop and get a screw on Presta to Schrader adapter. They are usually in a plastic container next to the cash register.

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    Nat
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    Edit: It appears that while I was taking so long to type out my reply, RS VR6 beat me to it with all the answers.

    1. Thatís not a seal. Itís a travel indicator o-ring. You slide it all the way down then when the fork compresses the gauge stays up to show you how far the suspension moved. Itís useful for making adjustments to your fork, such as setting sag (basic) and also when evaluating spring pressure and rate (a little more advanced).

    2. You should be able to move the rebound adjustment knob with just light torque (e.g., finger strength). Are you sure you that was the rebound adjustment knob you were trying to move and not something that disassembles the fork?

    3. Thatís called a Presta valve. The other type of valve that youíre used to is called a Shraeder valve. Many bike pumps fit both. You could alternatively use a Shraeder-to-Presta adapter. https://www.bicycling.com/repair/a20...-and-a-presta/

    4. Letís see the pedals.

  4. #4
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    New bikes come with junk pedals (or no pedals at all) because they're a personal preference item that often gets changed out right away. The manufacture doesn't know weather the buyer prefers clipless or flat pedals.
    I brake for stinkbugs

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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidLoPan View Post
    Always a chance something was overtorqued i guess, but no real way to tell that unless i go trying to loosen shit.
    Since the other questions were answered: there is a rather easy way. Use a grease pen (or sharpie--removable with alcohol instead of mineral spirits) to mark a line off the screw and onto the area surrounding it. Loosen the screw and re-torque to the lowest acceptable value, and see if the marks line up. [nb: this is called a witness marking, and it an easy way to determine if something is coming loose without grabbing for a tool]

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    No, no, no. Y'all are wrong about the blue o-ring. That right there is called the fun-o-meter. When the fun-o-meter is low, you're not having much fun. When it's pushed up high, it means you're having lots of fun. For best results, reset it at 0 before every ride.

    The cheap pedals that came with your bike are basically just test ride pedals. They're no good for anything else. Usually less expensive bikes come with them, and nicer bikes don't. There's no clean cutoff for when that happens, though. Most shops keep a supply of nicer test ride pedals on hand for the nicer bikes that don't include them. Don't even bother trying to ride those pedals. Get yourself something like a RaceFace Chester or similar pedal. You shouldn't have to spend more than $50 or so to get a good, grippy pedal to start with.

    With regards to the valves and the adapters, IMO, it's best to just make sure you have pumps that can work with them. The adapters work, but one of the advantages of presta valves is that you can tighten that little nut and "lock" them closed. If you don't do that, they're almost guaranteed to leak. So that makes the adapters a PITA in that you have to remove the adapter, loosen the little nut, put the adapter back on, inflate/check pressure, take the adapter off, tighten the nut, put the adapter back on. Ugh. Speaking of tire pressures, you're going to be running pressures lower than you have in the past with the bigger tires. I'd recommend a Meiser 0-30psi gauge for this bike. They're pretty inexpensive, and at the pressures you're likely to run in this bike, the gauges on most floor pumps are going to be next to useless to replicate a pressure you like when you find it.

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    I think you would have to go looking for a specific floor pump that only works with schraeder valves these days. Presta has been common on bicycles for decades.

    David- to answer your questions, find some video guides associated with the topics "how to set sag on mountain bike fork" and how to use presta valve".

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    Some pumps require shifting some parts around in the chuck to switch from presta to schrader. These typically require unscrewing a collar, flipping the gasket and possibly a pin, and screwing the collar back on. Many current floor pumps have chucks that will simply fit either, the presta going further into the chuck than the schrader.
    Do the math.

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    Yeah i figured there had to be something with that o-ring. It def didn't look like it'd play any integral role in anything as a seal, and beyond that I couldn't see where/how it could have went or been dislodged from. Interesting this is what it's for though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    No, no, no. Y'all are wrong about the blue o-ring. That right there is called the fun-o-meter. When the fun-o-meter is low, you're not having much fun. When it's pushed up high, it means you're having lots of fun. For best results, reset it at 0 before every ride.

    The cheap pedals that came with your bike are basically just test ride pedals. They're no good for anything else. Usually less expensive bikes come with them, and nicer bikes don't. There's no clean cutoff for when that happens, though. Most shops keep a supply of nicer test ride pedals on hand for the nicer bikes that don't include them. Don't even bother trying to ride those pedals. Get yourself something like a RaceFace Chester or similar pedal. You shouldn't have to spend more than $50 or so to get a good, grippy pedal to start with.

    With regards to the valves and the adapters, IMO, it's best to just make sure you have pumps that can work with them. The adapters work, but one of the advantages of presta valves is that you can tighten that little nut and "lock" them closed. If you don't do that, they're almost guaranteed to leak. So that makes the adapters a PITA in that you have to remove the adapter, loosen the little nut, put the adapter back on, inflate/check pressure, take the adapter off, tighten the nut, put the adapter back on. Ugh. Speaking of tire pressures, you're going to be running pressures lower than you have in the past with the bigger tires. I'd recommend a Meiser 0-30psi gauge for this bike. They're pretty inexpensive, and at the pressures you're likely to run in this bike, the gauges on most floor pumps are going to be next to useless to replicate a pressure you like when you find it.
    Interesting about the guage. So just getting a bike pump that is suitable for presta valves, that has a guage, isn't likely to be workable? Why is that exactly? Why would the Meiser gauge be necessary? Don't believe ive ever read anyone else commenting that gauges on a bike pump are insufficient.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post

    2. You should be able to move the rebound adjustment knob with just light torque (e.g., finger strength). Are you sure you that was the rebound adjustment knob you were trying to move and not something that disassembles the fork?
    It had it written right on it that that's what it was, plus the manual(i was bored and read it) said that's what the red knob was for.

  10. #10
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    I think we're all jaded about the accuracy of the built-in gauges on floor pumps. I've never known one to be very accurate after you compare it to one or two that you feel confident are accurate. NO ONE who knows any better trusts the gauge on their pump. That's been a common refrain for as long as I can remember.

    It's important to get your tire pressure just right, but YOUR right amount takes experience to figure out. Two PSI too low and you start smacking your rim on stuff, but two PSI to high and you lose traction when you expect to have it.

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    Tire pressure is something you need to figure out, on my road bike anything over 80 is okay ,under 80 is too soft. The range of too soft or too hard with those tires is a lot smaller, maybe around 5 pounds.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidLoPan View Post
    So just getting a bike pump that is suitable for presta valves, that has a guage, isn't likely to be workable? Why is that exactly? Why would the Meiser gauge be necessary? Don't believe ive ever read anyone else commenting that gauges on a bike pump are insufficient.
    The gauge on the pump will be totally fine. The idea is you dial in the "right" tire pressure by feel, then use a gauge to record where you're at. Then, you use that same gauge every time to get you back to where you were before. If a gauge were calibrated in letters (A, B, C, D, etc.) instead of numbers you could still get the "right" pressure by pumping up to the same letter each time on that particular gauge.

    The nice thing about using a separate gauge is that a lot of them have a bleed valve. That way you overfill the tire by a little, the bleed out air until you're at the "right" number whatever that may be. If you use just the gauge on the pump then you'll have to keep removing the chuck from the valve to dial in the pressure. It can be done but it can be a pain in the butt if you have to do it several times just to get to your pressure.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    NO ONE who knows any better trusts the gauge on their pump. That's been a common refrain for as long as I can remember.

    I do, it may not be accurate but it's consistent. Good enough for me.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rangeriderdave View Post
    Tire pressure is something you need to figure out, on my road bike anything over 80 is okay ,under 80 is too soft.

    I'm happily running 70psi on my tubeless 25c road tires, thinking about dropping them to 65 and seeing how that goes.
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    My bike came with the tires fully inflated, and by that i mean im fairly certian they are at their FULL/TOP pressure. These things got ZERO give in em. Would it be a good idea to let some air out before riding?

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    Yes, holy shit you're going to beat the crap put of yourself at full pressure. the bike probably has tubes (not tubeless) so if you are not very heavy, I would start with 35psi and work your way down. That's a very, very vague and subjective number.

    use the gauge on your pump for now. it might not be objectively accurate, but if it's consistent, you can use it to find a tire pressure that works for you.

    most riders of average weight and standard tires in the 2.25-2.4" range get away with low-mid 20s in psi with tubeless tires. bigger riders will want a little more pressure to avoid bottoming out their tires. bigger tires allow for less pressure. tubeless tires also allow for less pressure. basically, most people aim for a tire pressure that is just high enough that they get maximum traction but minimized the chances of your rim hitting the ground.

    just ride it. learn to patch tubes.

    I just read a description of the bike on their website. did it come with a set fo spare valves? if so, those are for setting it up tubeless.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidLoPan View Post
    My bike came with the tires fully inflated, and by that i mean im fairly certian they are at their FULL/TOP pressure. These things got ZERO give in em. Would it be a good idea to let some air out before riding?
    Have you had a chance to ride it outside yet? I'd leave everything alone until you can get outside on it at least a little. Full pressure on a 2.6 tire will be way too much for riding but if you're just pushing on it with your finger inside your living room then you won't be able to tell a thing.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidLoPan View Post
    Interesting about the guage. So just getting a bike pump that is suitable for presta valves, that has a guage, isn't likely to be workable? Why is that exactly? Why would the Meiser gauge be necessary? Don't believe ive ever read anyone else commenting that gauges on a bike pump are insufficient.
    The deal is that analog gauges are most accurate when the pressure they display is near the middle of the range displayed on the gauge. They're least accurate at the extremes. Digital gauges function differently and don't have the same limitation, but pumps with digital gauges are usually a good bit more expensive. There are digital pressure gauges for presta valves on the market, but I've had mixed results with the quality on those. Either way, for my mountain bikes, the gauges on my pumps suck because the first numbered marking on the pressure scale is no smaller than 20psi. None of my mountain bikes uses a pressure above 20psi, and one of them (my fatbike) uses pressures less than 10psi. For my wife and I's commuter bikes that typically get pressures around 50psi, the pump gauge does fine.

    The Meiser AccuGage gives me a scale of 0-30psi, with number markings every 5 psi, plus sub markings that are easily visible so I can get tire pressures on my mountain bikes repeatably within 0.5psi. On my fatbike, that's noticeable. Half a psi on my other mtbs isn't noticeable, but 1psi is. And that's the key. Repeatability. If I used the gauges on my pumps, I might get within 5psi of what I wanted, maybe. And getting to the same every time isn't really repeatable. The squeeze test isn't any better, either. For one, my hands aren't remotely calibrated.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    The gauge on the pump will be totally fine. The idea is you dial in the "right" tire pressure by feel, then use a gauge to record where you're at. Then, you use that same gauge every time to get you back to where you were before. If a gauge were calibrated in letters (A, B, C, D, etc.) instead of numbers you could still get the "right" pressure by pumping up to the same letter each time on that particular gauge.
    To clarify the "feel" comment. Squeezing the tire won't tell you much. It's often the best you've got if you're repairing a tire on the trail, but that's not the "feel" you're looking for. You're looking for the way the bike feels when you ride it. That's what's important. You want good traction from your tire. You want the tire to flex just enough under small bumps to smooth them out and not bounce off of them. But you don't want so much tire compression that the tire feels vague under cornering or you're smashing your rim on stuff. So the idea is that you ride, experiment with pressures, and when you're happy, with what you've got, THEN you use the gauge to see where you're at and you record it. Kinda hard to record a pressure when the gauge needle doesn't show you anything useful.

    Here are some pics of the gauges on the various pumps I have. One thing I've noticed that I've alluded to above is that the higher the pressure in your tires, the more change it takes before I actually notice a difference in pressure. So, let's say I'm running 100psi in a road bike tire. 10psi difference is definitely noticeable to me, but 5psi generally isn't. On my commuter bikes, they're generally in the 50psi-ish neighborhood depending on what I'm riding. On those, 5psi difference is noticeable to me, but 1psi difference definitely is not. On my regular mtbs, 1-2psi is noticeable, but less than 1psi definitely isn't. On my fatbike, 0.25-0.5psi difference is noticeable. That also correlates to tire size. The road bike with the highest pressures is the smallest tire with the least volume, and the fatbike with the lowest pressure is the largest tire with the most volume.


    2020-02-16_09-51-21 by Nate, on Flickr

    Only one mark below 20psi. Even above it, marks are only every 5psi and they're kinda close together, so getting anything repeatably within 1psi just isn't gonna happen. This one is definitely intended for road bikes, and is meant to be able to handle some of the really high end tubular tires and such that you'd inflate anywhere close to this high.


    2020-02-16_09-51-09 by Nate, on Flickr

    This gauge is no good for mountain bikes. Marks every 10psi. Lowest mark is at 30psi. Same idea with regards to the intent for this gauge to read road bike pressures.


    0216200910 by Nate, on Flickr

    This one suffers a different problem. Sure, it has lots of divisions (every 2psi), but they're so close together that they're next to impossible to distinguish. The needle will usually cover up multiple marks at once. This gauge is at the bottom of the pump like all the others, so I feel like I need binoculars to read it because it's so small.

    Of these pumps, the first one (a Serfas) is the nicest pump. The gauge is the biggest and generally most useful, but it's more optimized for road bike pressures than mtb pressures. I bought it cheap (I probably spent less on that one than any of the others) because it was well used in a shop as a customer loaner for a year or two before I bought it.


    2020-02-16_09-50-43 by Nate, on Flickr

    Here's the Meiser Accu-Gage. For one, it's a very readable gauge. The pressure range is more useful for a mtb. They sell different ranges if you happen to need to read higher pressures (0-60psi) or lower pressures (0-15psi). Keep in mind that analog gauges like this are most accurate around the middle of their ranges.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    The nice thing about using a separate gauge is that a lot of them have a bleed valve. That way you overfill the tire by a little, the bleed out air until you're at the "right" number whatever that may be. If you use just the gauge on the pump then you'll have to keep removing the chuck from the valve to dial in the pressure. It can be done but it can be a pain in the butt if you have to do it several times just to get to your pressure.
    Yes, that's also quite true and I use the bleed valve often enough on mine. The bleed valve isn't so useful for letting out a lot of air if you inflated WAY over your desired pressure, but it's good for fine adjustments.

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidLoPan View Post
    My bike came with the tires fully inflated, and by that i mean im fairly certian they are at their FULL/TOP pressure. These things got ZERO give in em. Would it be a good idea to let some air out before riding?
    Definitely let air out. Follow the mantra "if in doubt, let it out" until you get to the point where you start feeling negative effects of excessively low pressure. Vagueness or floppiness in corners, pinch flats, rim strikes. When you get to that point, raise the pressure until those effects go away. Shops usually inflate to max pressure so they don't have to inflate the tires on sales floor bikes as often. On yours, I'll bet that they did a tire pressure check before they shipped it.

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    I guess everyone has a different approach, but I think some are kinda over-thinking it. Like Nat, I go by feel most rides. I might ride 3 days in a row, and never put any air in. I always give the tires a squeeze, tho.
    My Lyzene Steel floor pump gauge is dead accurate at 20 psi. Iíve checked it against several other gauges to make sure. My front tire gets 20 psi plus 2 pumps.
    Rear gets 20 plus 4 pumps.

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    Quote Originally Posted by downcountry View Post
    I guess everyone has a different approach, but I think some are kinda over-thinking it. Like Nat, I go by feel most rides. I might ride 3 days in a row, and never put any air in. I always give the tires a squeeze, tho.
    My Lyzene Steel floor pump gauge is dead accurate at 20 psi. Iíve checked it against several other gauges to make sure. My front tire gets 20 psi plus 2 pumps.
    Rear gets 20 plus 4 pumps.
    You think I'm over-thinking things, but I'm not doing nearly as much as you think I am.

    Sure, if I ride 3 days in a row, my tires haven't likely lost enough pressure to matter unless there's a puncture or my sealant dried out. In that case, it's kinda obvious there's a problem.

    Lezyne pumps have better quality gauges than most, so you are speaking from a position of privilege in that regard.

    My usual method when I go into the garage to grab bikes for a ride is to check pressures with the gauge. Sometimes I don't have to mess with them beyond that. Other times I do. I usually use the Serfas pump at home, and have a pretty good idea of how many pumps gets me close to the pressure I want. Then I double check with the gauge and maybe let a touch of air out, then suit up and go. My regular mtb with 29x2.6 tires pretty much gets the same pressures no matter where I'm riding.

    The fatbike forced me to pay more attention to pressures than some. I came up with different pressures for different conditions expected on a ride. For dry trails, that usually meant about 8.5-9psi. For packed snow, usually around 6psi. For deep, fresh snow, 2psi at indoor temps. Getting pressures right before I leave is MUCH better than trying to fiddle with the little presta nut outside with cold fingers to let air out. Plus repeatedly stopping to fuss with tire pressures in the cold sucks.

  21. #21
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    You determine optimal tire pressure by riding/testing. You need a gauge with enough resolution and repeatability so that you can reliably set that pressure once you've arrived at it.
    Do the math.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    You think I'm over-thinking things, but I'm not doing nearly as much as you think I am.

    Sure, if I ride 3 days in a row, my tires haven't likely lost enough pressure to matter unless there's a puncture or my sealant dried out. In that case, it's kinda obvious there's a problem.

    Lezyne pumps have better quality gauges than most, so you are speaking from a position of privilege in that regard.

    My usual method when I go into the garage to grab bikes for a ride is to check pressures with the gauge. Sometimes I don't have to mess with them beyond that. Other times I do. I usually use the Serfas pump at home, and have a pretty good idea of how many pumps gets me close to the pressure I want. Then I double check with the gauge and maybe let a touch of air out, then suit up and go. My regular mtb with 29x2.6 tires pretty much gets the same pressures no matter where I'm riding.

    The fatbike forced me to pay more attention to pressures than some. I came up with different pressures for different conditions expected on a ride. For dry trails, that usually meant about 8.5-9psi. For packed snow, usually around 6psi. For deep, fresh snow, 2psi at indoor temps. Getting pressures right before I leave is MUCH better than trying to fiddle with the little presta nut outside with cold fingers to let air out. Plus repeatedly stopping to fuss with tire pressures in the cold sucks.
    Sorry if my post sounded like I was calling you out to argue with. Didnít mean it that way. Just pointing out different strokes.

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    What's the appeal of presta valves btw? THey just work/hold air/etc. better? Why the changeover from schrader valves? Just curious.

    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Yes, holy shit you're going to beat the crap put of yourself at full pressure. the bike probably has tubes (not tubeless) so if you are not very heavy, I would start with 35psi and work your way down. That's a very, very vague and subjective number.

    use the gauge on your pump for now. it might not be objectively accurate, but if it's consistent, you can use it to find a tire pressure that works for you.

    most riders of average weight and standard tires in the 2.25-2.4" range get away with low-mid 20s in psi with tubeless tires. bigger riders will want a little more pressure to avoid bottoming out their tires. bigger tires allow for less pressure. tubeless tires also allow for less pressure. basically, most people aim for a tire pressure that is just high enough that they get maximum traction but minimized the chances of your rim hitting the ground.

    just ride it. learn to patch tubes.

    I just read a description of the bike on their website. did it come with a set fo spare valves? if so, those are for setting it up tubeless.
    I wasn't planning on hitting mountain bike trails any time soon, weather hasn't been cutting enough breaks. Was just gonna ride around a bike trail(concrete/recreational walking/bike trail), get a feel for it and so forth.

    haha and my bike pump is so low rent it doesnt have a gauge at all. Im used to used dept store bikes, I inflated tires till they felt full, but not TOO full, all based on feel, cuz why not?

    It did come with 2 spare valves. I assumed that's what they were for.
    Last edited by DavidLoPan; 02-16-2020 at 07:49 PM.

  24. #24
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    Pumps aside, as long as you have one with a gauge I agree that starting at 30-ish and dropping a PSI or 2 every ride until you find what you like should work reasonably well. Max pressure might be fine for the sidewalk, but that's about it.

    Presta vs. Schrader - google to your heart's content. Here's one brief explanation.
    :nono: :thumbsup:

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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidLoPan View Post
    What's the appeal of presta valves btw? THey just work/hold air/etc. better? Why the changeover from schrader valves? Just curious.



    I wasn't planning on hitting trails any time soon, weather hasn't been cutting enough breaks. Was just gonna ride around a bike trail, get a feel for it and so forth.

    haha and my bike pump is so low rent it doesnt have a gauge at all. Im used to used dept store bikes, I inflated tires till they felt full, but not TOO full, all based on feel, cuz why not?

    It did come with 2 spare valves. I assumed that's what they were for.
    Those
    ďSpareĒ valves are for converting your tires to tubeless.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidLoPan View Post
    What's the appeal of presta valves btw? THey just work/hold air/etc. better? Why the changeover from schrader valves? Just curious.
    Basically comes from road riding, narrow rims, presta have smaller valves, so small holes in rimes, in the early 90's mtb running narrow rims all in the save weight, but be strong, so use small hole/presta. Presta pretty much became ubiquitous and schrader got relegated to "cheap crap" bikes and that has stuck.
    Also for me, schrader, would move in the tyre and end up shredding the valve on the rim hole, so I thought they sucked, presta if you use the nut dont move. And if you don't use a cap, they fill up with gunk and won't seal. Others have issues with breaking presta valve nuts. So depends who you talk to, how good they are.

    Plus if you are out on the trail, someone needs a tube, schrader won't fit a presta drilled rim.
    All the gear and no idea.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    To clarify the "feel" comment. Squeezing the tire won't tell you much. It's often the best you've got if you're repairing a tire on the trail, but that's not the "feel" you're looking for. You're looking for the way the bike feels when you ride it.
    Yes Harold, thank you for clarifying that idea. I meant "feel" while riding the bike and how the tire handles the trail, not how the tire feels by squeezing it with your hand. It didn't occur to me when I typed it that "feel" could also have been interpreted as how it feels in his hand.

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    Presta valves really don't offer any benefits over shraeder valves. Not that presta are so ubiquitous, it's hard to convert. It takes 10 seconds to figure out how a presta valve works, so just go with it until the world comes to it's senses.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Presta valves really don't offer any benefits over shraeder valves. Not that presta are so ubiquitous, it's hard to convert. It takes 10 seconds to figure out how a presta valve works, so just go with it until the world comes to it's senses.


    What are the negatives of presta valves?
    I brake for stinkbugs

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    As evidenced by this thread, they confuse the hell outta people. They also require a special pump when most normal pumps for cars and everything but bicycles just use a schraeder. Presta offers zero benefits but smugness and memetic inertia.

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    When you have a moment, remove the warning stickers off of your rims. Doing so would give your bike a few extra PSI of air and give you some style points while out on the trails.
    Cannondale Synapse Neo

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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    As evidenced by this thread, they confuse the hell outta people. They also require a special pump when most normal pumps for cars and everything but bicycles just use a schraeder. Presta offers zero benefits but smugness and memetic inertia.

    Not trying to be smug but I admit I just don't understand the problem with them. You do have to unscrew the little nut on top but after doing it once I don't see how it's confusing. Pretty much every bike pump made works for presta valves so that's not an issue and most people don't go to gas stations to inflate their bike tires.

    I guess it wouldn't matter much either way for mtb tires but since I ride road too it seems simpler to me to have them both use the same valve. If someone prefers schrader that's fine, they can switch, but to equate presta valves with being smug seems quite the stretch.
    I brake for stinkbugs

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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I do, it may not be accurate but it's consistent. Good enough for me.
    I do as well. Mine is not only accurate, verified against multiple digital and analog gauges, and consistent.

    Sent from my SM-N975U1 using Tapatalk

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Not trying to be smug but I admit I just don't understand the problem with them. You do have to unscrew the little nut on top but after doing it once I don't see how it's confusing. Pretty much every bike pump made works for presta valves so that's not an issue and most people don't go to gas stations to inflate their bike tires.

    I guess it wouldn't matter much either way for mtb tires but since I ride road too it seems simpler to me to have them both use the same valve. If someone prefers schrader that's fine, they can switch, but to equate presta valves with being smug seems quite the stretch.
    Yeah, no "smugness" with them. It's what all my rims are drilled for and I'm well used to them. Seems more of a hassle to drill the rims out to change them over and for what benefit? None.

    I get that there are quality schraeder valves, but that's certainly not what OP is used to. The biggest benefit OP is going to find with presta is that the valves stay put and don't move, get crooked, and cause tube failures at the base.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    ...most people don't go to gas stations to inflate their bike tires.
    But when they do it can be hilarious! BOOM!
    :nono: :thumbsup:

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    Isnt a Schrader valve basically a Presta without the nut on top and with a sleeve screwed on the exterior (that happens to support the poppet as well)?

    When I was in college there was a bike shop that had an airhose (connected to a compressor) just lying on the sidewalk in front of their shop. This was in the middle of a student housing area, so it got a lot of use and was available 24/7.

    Fairly regularly, you'd here a pop and cursing as some nimrod severely overfilled his tire.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    You do have to unscrew the little nut on top but after doing it once I don't see how it's confusing.
    not smug, but have you met the average person when it comes to basic mechanical things? last week, I had to teach a coworker, a man in his 30s, how to turn a screw clockwise to tighten it. working in bike shops for a while taught me that what many of us take for granted as obvious is voodoo to the rest of the population.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    not smug, but have you met the average person when it comes to basic mechanical things?


    Yes, I have, and generally after one 60 second tutorial they can inflate a presta valve on their own. Those that can't don't have much hope of operating things like gears or dropper posts either and usually end up riding something more appropriate for their skill level like a 1 speed coaster brake cruiser.

    Schrader valves aren't self explanatory either, my dad had to teach me how to use one when I was around 5 y/o.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  39. #39
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    Which model Sentier and/or which model fork ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by TwiceHorn View Post
    Isnt a Schrader valve basically a Presta without the nut on top and with a sleeve screwed on the exterior (that happens to support the poppet as well)?
    So, what you're saying is that because they're both valves, they're basically the same? I mean, okay, that's true.

    But they do have important differences that affect how you deal with them. One being their diameter. The other being the way the poppet is actuated. In Schrader, it's got a spring that closes it. In Presta, the air pressure inside does that, so it's mechanically "simpler" if you will. Then there's the nut on Presta that locks it closed. That pretty much covers it. There's not much to either type, because, yes, they're both valves.

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