What's a good way to practice technical uphills, without riding technical uphills?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    What's a good way to practice technical uphills, without riding technical uphills?

    Yeah yeah, I know the most common advice is to just practice on the actual terrain. But the problem is that all kinds of bad stuff can happen if you mess up, e.g. bent derailleur, twisted ankle, busted nuts, sprained wrist, fall off the side of the mountain, etc.

    Unlike my younger days, I have a nice normal job now that requires my body parts to work. So even though my health insurance is better, I don't wanna put up with injuries.

  2. #2
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    There's probably a good virtual reality mountain biking program available somewhere.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  3. #3
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    Better fitness is a good start. Even easy sections can be tough when you're exhausted. Otherwise setup a trials course at home?

  4. #4
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    Isolating specific skills used in technical climbing and low speed work would be beneficial. Riding curbs or skinnies, getting up on a stack of pallets or a boulder, and dialing in standing body position on climbs should all help, I would think.

  5. #5
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    find some set of stone stairs, like in the city, some structure, stacked pallets
    might be too loose...

    100% serious here

    practice bunny hopping them... up sideways, up frontways, up backwards.
    master getting up at least 20 steps no dab. if only 5 steps then do it 4 times
    in a row, no dab. you dab, you try again.
    key is get your bike handling kung-fu down pat. and hopping around
    changing elevation does that.

    it takes a lot of effort and practice but if you succeed, anything you encounter on
    a technical climb in the woods will either be a breeze, or easy to figure out.

    tech climbs are a lot more about your core and bike handing than raw power, but you
    do need to be able to supply at or above lactate threshold power on climbs

  6. #6
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    I am working with a chiro at the moment and he has me on an intense physical training program to strengthen and stabilize my core to help with lower back pain I have been having. Squats, planks, bridges, etc. I am getting a lot stronger and it's definitely apparent in my riding. You can only push what you can stabilize.

    This is only part of the puzzle, but if you learn and practice core-strengthen exercises (abs, obliques, glutes, quads, hip flexors, etc) in your down time, you'll be a stronger rider.

    Look for a book called Core Advantage by Tom Danielson and Allison Westfahl. I borrowed it from my local library.

  7. #7
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    I think everything mentioned here (except my previous post) is helpful, practicing trials moves like boulder and stair hopping are all good but not necessarily any safer than just practicing a technical climb. As long as you use flat pedals I don't see technical climbing as a particularly dangerous part of mountain biking.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  8. #8
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    ^that. I have been riding in flat pedals and Giro sneakers lately. it boosts my confidence 100% when appoaching something tricky. you loose some power and control over being clipped in, but it forces you to ride more efficiently in the process.

  9. #9
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    Find individual silly stuff to climb up.

    Example:
    There are boulders I climb up and roll off of and repeat for a set of boulders in the parking lot of the easiest trail in town when waiting for other riders.

    Stairs
    - bunny hop up a three step staircase, (nose hop?)
    - Climb big staircases

    Trackstanding on steeps
    - super steep driveways, practice stop and starting
    Ever get stuck behind someone stalling? these skills will allow you to stop and pass as they dab without killing your flow. Also valuable for passing in races.

    Ride anything that looks silly and progress.

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