What makes a front end difficult to get up?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    What makes a front end difficult to get up?

    So im trying to figure out why my buddies bikes front end just pops up with intention and an average pedal stroke. My ride on the other hand seems to take a much more exaggerated stroke and weight shift.

    Im 6'0 220.

    His:
    Trek 4300 (roughly 28lbs) 21.5"
    Shimano LX 175mm crankset
    100mm Stem
    RS Duke Race (100mm)
    Sun Rhyno Lite Wheels
    Kenda Blue Groove


    Mine:
    Specialized Enduro Pro HT (roughly 32lbs) 20.5"
    75mm Stem
    Atomlab Aircorp Wheelset
    SLX Double 170mm Crankset
    Fox Vanilla RLC (140mm)
    Maxxis High Roller

    Opinions?

    Thanks

    Justin

  2. #2
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    um, his front end is lighter?
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  3. #3
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    An ugly girlfriend or wife?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    um, his front end is lighter?
    I second that.

    I just replaced my Dart 2 with a 2 pound liter Manitou R7. Before I couldn't pop my front off the ground very easily. With my new fork something as simple as compressing and lifting gives me what seems like 5 inches. It could also have something to do with the fork not having the correct sag, and rebound for your weight.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    um, his front end is lighter?
    Nah, within that small weight distribution (28 vs. 32 lbs) it's really more about leverage, and Justin's bike is actually set up to wheelie easier, with the possible confounder of the shorter crankarms.

    Justin, I'm afraid you just lack your friend's brojo. Don't believe me? Switch bikes with him and see what happens.

    David B.

  6. #6
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    Maybe he's just a better rider than you

    Seriously though, lifting the front end of your bike can be done in two easy ways:

    Make sure you're in the right gear - if you ride a lot this is second nature, you should be able to lift your front wheel without throwing your weight back or hauling on the bars.

    Alternately back off the rebound damping on your fork and learn to preload your fork and then unweight it just before the log or kerb or whatever you are trying to clear - the fork will bounce your front wheel over smallish obstacles.

    Technique is earned through hours in the saddle, you just have to figure out what works best for you.
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  7. #7
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    Saddle to bar height difference, maybe? Maybe your saddle is higher relative to your handle bars compared your friend's bike. Is your saddle higher than you bars, is your friends?
    It's not enough that we do our best; sometimes we have to do what's required.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by JayDial
    So im trying to figure out why my buddies bikes front end just pops up with intention and an average pedal stroke. My ride on the other hand seems to take a much more exaggerated stroke and weight shift.

    Im 6'0 220.

    His:
    Trek 4300 (roughly 28lbs) 21.5"
    Shimano LX 175mm crankset
    100mm Stem
    RS Duke Race (100mm)
    Sun Rhyno Lite Wheels
    Kenda Blue Groove


    Mine:
    Specialized Enduro Pro HT (roughly 32lbs) 20.5"
    75mm Stem
    Atomlab Aircorp Wheelset
    SLX Double 170mm Crankset
    Fox Vanilla RLC (140mm)
    Maxxis High Roller

    Opinions?

    Thanks

    Justin
    Hardtails are easier to loft the front end on than full suspension bikes, but (assuming proper fit) it is largely technique.
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  9. #9
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    Chainstay length? Shorter chainstays make it easy to pop up the front wheel.

  10. #10
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    Also, doesn't chainstay length make a difference as well?

  11. #11
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    And has anyone mentioned chainstay length?

    5 is the old new black; 6 is the new new black...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidbeinct
    Nah, within that small weight distribution (28 vs. 32 lbs) it's really more about leverage, and Justin's bike is actually set up to wheelie easier, with the possible confounder of the shorter crankarms.

    Justin, I'm afraid you just lack your friend's brojo. Don't believe me? Switch bikes with him and see what happens.

    David B.
    Well thats the problem. I rode both bikes when i made this realization. I dont think he could do a wheelie if he wanted to (i hope he reads this).

    So shorter crank arms should make it easier? I was kinda thinking that is where i was lacking.

    J

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    Hardtails are easier to loft the front end on than full suspension bikes, but (assuming proper fit) it is largely technique.
    My bike is a hard tail. Enduro Pro HT (hard tail)

    J

  14. #14
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    Air vs coil.

    Coil springs will not ramp up when the fork travel compresses, air ramps up quite a bit.

    Dampening cartridges will change the handling characteristics, which is why some coil forks also have an "air assist".

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by marzjennings
    Saddle to bar height difference, maybe? Maybe your saddle is higher relative to your handle bars compared your friend's bike. Is your saddle higher than you bars, is your friends?
    This is interesting. I will try dropping my seat and see if that makes things easier.

  16. #16
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    The rebound and sag setting comments are interesting also. Its very possible i have over tweaked my fork settings and need to go back to the default. I usually only run about 3 clicks of rebound. I think default is 6. I also am running the medium spring so i will install the firm spring and see what happens!

    J

  17. #17
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    It's about how close your butt is to the wheel axle. How close is the balance point. Short chainstays move the axle under your butt, slack seat angle moves your butt back, and a short tt length lets you get your butt further back if need be. Weight of the front end makes a difference, but not nearly as much.

    In the case of you guys, his longer fork is probably responsible for some of the difference.
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  18. #18
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    Wtf

    Quote Originally Posted by JayDial
    Well thats the problem. I rode both bikes when i made this realization. I dont think he could do a wheelie if he wanted to (i hope he reads this).

    So shorter crank arms should make it easier? I was kinda thinking that is where i was lacking.

    J


    Yes I did read this... and I can do a wheelie,, just not very far.

  19. #19
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    His chainstay length is most likely shorter, and his longer stem also helps. His fork and wheelset also play somewhat of a role, but it's mostly geometry wise that his bike will have more of a tendency to wheelie.

  20. #20
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    I found on my Trek 6000 when I went to a 90mm stem vs the stock 110mm stem I am able to pull up easier. My assumption was that the longer stem moved my weight forward somewhat so the wheel was harder to get off the ground. The shorter stem essentially puts you in a more upright position and shifts your weight to the rear.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by tjchad
    I found on my Trek 6000 when I went to a 90mm stem vs the stock 110mm stem I am able to pull up easier. My assumption was that the longer stem moved my weight forward somewhat so the wheel was harder to get off the ground. The shorter stem essentially puts you in a more upright position and shifts your weight to the rear.

    The more difficult bike to get up has a 75mm stem as opposed to the 100mm on the easier bike to wheelie.

    J

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