Warm up, what works for you?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    Thread Killer
    Reputation: Hardluckhero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    131

    Warm up, what works for you?

    It takes me a good 40-45 minutes of ride time to get to a point where my lungs and legs are in sync and I don't feel like I am fighting the bike or the trail. I've tried starting out spinning more and I've tried mashing more, I've tried the bikejames warm up and I don't feel it does what I need it to do. Do I need to get on the exercise bike or trainer at home and pedal for 20-30 minutes at home before I get to the trail? I expect there to be a warm up time but 40-45 minutes of ride time seems a bit long. Any help would be appreciated.
    Cholla cactus=nature's guard rail.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: drblauston's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    123
    some days I go out and the 15 minute ride to the trail head is good enough for me. Other days it takes a 4-6 mile loop before I feel sufficiently warmed up - I wouldn't think that 45 minutes is too long on some days and if you can ride outside there's no real reason to get a trainer unless the weather is pretty gnarly where you are. If you struggle with the trail a whole lot before being warmed up then maybe you could get a trainer or just ride on a smooth singletrack to get warmed up? I personally wouldn't pay for one though it's up to you and what helps you enjoy your ride the most mate!

  3. #3
    Ride More, Work Less
    Reputation: heyyall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    7,774
    You may have to try a few things to see what works for you. Here is what works for me. I like to make sure I eat something light (eg fruit, sports drink, energy gel, etc) right before starting to increase my blood sugar. This helps me avoid a little sugar low between the point where you deplete much of your blood glucose and when your liver stimulates glucose production. If your brain feels like its in a fog during your first 45 minutes, this might work for you too.
    Craigslist & MTBR --free ads for all

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sponger's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    466
    I like to do a couple of core strengthening moves like planks and crunches for a little bit of protection for the lower back.

  5. #5
    Thread Killer
    Reputation: Hardluckhero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    131
    Thanks for the replies, it may all be in my head, but it seems that the first 20 minutes are spent trying to find the right gear/cadence, the next 20 I spend trying to get into a rythym and then all of a sudden, I could pedal along hold a conversation and pedal on for a few hours. Maybe I'm trying to get out of the gate too fast since I feel fresh when I first get riding and have to go thru the other stages to get to an efficient cadence/ pedal resistance.
    Cholla cactus=nature's guard rail.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dirtyjack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    980
    For me it's stretching before the ride and not hammering too hard until I feel like I'm warmed up, usually 20-30 minutes into the ride.
    Pivot Switchblade
    SantaCruz Tallboy C
    SantaCruz Solo C
    Specialized Fatboy
    Trek Madone 8
    Lemond Zurich

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,000
    im not very experienced but i like to just start slow and moderate, ideally i like to take my time and spin a lower gear to get the heart rate up. Problem is my favorite local trails tax you rite out of the gate uphill for tuff long climbs. maybe i need a better warm up also.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    6

    Warm ups take time

    I've been riding 3 times a week for about 2 years now. Some of our rides have no chance to warm up before the torch, others have miles of rollers and little climbs. For me, I find that I get in the grove about 8-10 miles in. After that, I can go on for about another 15 before I feel the wall getting close. I found that riding later in the day, after working etc., helps shorten the time. Also, if the trails have an immediate ***** of a climb, I get off and run my bike up hill. Some guys give me hell for getting off, but hustling up a steep track with a bike will warm your who body up fast.

    Another trick that I do in the summer is to drink a "RADLER" 30 min before. A Radler is a German cycling tradition, created in the 50's for touring, but it works for mountain too. Mix a light beer with lemon lime soda or limeade. Sounds weird, but its refreshing and gives you a boost of easily digestible carbs, and just enough alcohol to dull the pain!

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    10
    I usually take it slow and ride with easy gears in the beginning, some stretching on that and I'm good to go. I have about 25 min to ride to the woods.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    10
    Maybe try to on easy gears try to get your heart rate up after 10 min just to warn your body that more is coming ^^

  11. #11
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    18,453
    OP - what are the beginnings of your trails like?

    I don't usually bother to warm up, per se, unless I'm actually racing or doing an intervals workout. Even for intervals I don't necessarily bother. Here're some things I've noticed about warming up for me, maybe some of them will be useful for you.

    A "real" warmup probably takes me about a half hour. But I'm most of the way there in about fifteen minutes.

    Usually, just riding is enough. But if I'm specifically warming up, I think I warm up a bit faster and maybe a bit better doing ramps. This is an exercise in which I start by spinning a low gear, and then shift up one gear at a time, and don't shift up again until I get on top of each gear. Eventually, I can't get on top of the gears anymore. Then I shift up another two or so, get out of the saddle, and sprint for a bit. Not too long, I'm not trying to tire myself out. Then I shift all the way back to where I started and repeat the process. This works best on a flat or gradually climbing road.

    If I'm not warmed up and I do something that requires a really high effort, like a steep climb, it can cause me to blow up even if I can do it when I am warmed up. People who do fast starts in their races report similar problems.

    How you can apply this kind of thing to riding on trails is going to depend some on your trails. If you have a non-technical start, you can do ramps or whatever to your heart's content. If your trails start with a tough singletrack climb, on the other hand, you might be better off pointing your bike in the other direction and spending several minutes warming up on the road. If there's no safe way to do that, maybe you can channel your inner racer d00d and take a trainer to the trailhead with you. If your trails are close and there's a safe route from your house, maybe just riding to the trail is the way to go. I think that singletrack can sometimes make it harder to warm up well because I think the sustained or smoothly increasing aerobic effort is a part of it. So unless you're on singletrack that you really have down, you could be looking at way too much variation and way too short a duration in your efforts to get a good warmup. If you can be consistent on your trails, though, maybe just not going out so hard at the beginning would help. Do you ride with other people? Do they tend to push you?

    People also have a few different warmup protocols, so you might experiment. I think people sometimes do hills, where they lower effort slowly instead of abruptly, instead of ramps, or one big hill or ramp, or intervals, probably not at as high an effort for the efforts as for a "real" intervals workout, although maybe for the last one.

    IMO, you're better off warming up on the bike vs. doing calisthenics stuff, if we're looking at the same bikejames warmup. (But he and I would seem to disagree on a number of points.)
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Tystevens's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,883
    I just get on the bike and deal with it, go a little slower if necessary, etc. The way I figure, I'd rather be 'warming up' on the bike than sitting on a trainer or exercise bike.
    '19 Ibis Ripmo
    '13 Felt Z4

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bigfruits's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    861
    not sure if this is the correct way but works for me:
    i ride hard for the fist 15 mins. after about 10 i can feel myself losing energy. i take a 5-7 min break and stretch a bit. after that im usually good to go.
    maybe try a short break after 20-30 mins of riding, see if you get your second wind sooner...

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by bigfruits View Post
    not sure if this is the correct way but works for me:
    i ride hard for the fist 15 mins. after about 10 i can feel myself losing energy. i take a 5-7 min break and stretch a bit. after that im usually good to go.
    maybe try a short break after 20-30 mins of riding, see if you get your second wind sooner...
    I do the same thing. ~15 min of hard riding and a 5 minute break. Immediately after the break I go a bit slow for a few minutes, but then I'm up to my 100%. Until I hit my wall near the end... <That's me hitting the wall!

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Camel Toad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    190
    I roll out to "unglue" my mucles with my TriggerPoint kit, a lacrosse ball, and foam roller before I leave to ride, and it definitely helps reduce warmup time a good bit.

  16. #16
    Thread Killer
    Reputation: Hardluckhero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    131
    AndrwSwitch some of the trails I ride jump right in to the tech stuff or climb, but most of the trails I ride have maybe a 1-1.5 mile lead in to the tech stuff or climbing.
    I rode on Sunday Tues and Wed and tried to pace myself out of the gate and it seems to have worked better as far as getting in a groove. I didn't really time it but my perception was that It was better. I wasn't trying to kill it causing my legs and lungs not to work together, just a nice easy pace.
    Thanks to everyone for the suggestions.
    Cholla cactus=nature's guard rail.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    13
    I roll out to "unglue" my mucles with my TriggerPoint kit, a lacrosse ball, and foam roller before I leave to ride, and it definitely helps reduce warmup time a good bit.
    Before I get going I usually have a jog around the block, then also do some stretching. After that it's right on the bike, starting at normal pace and increasing speed after the city limits until I'm at top speed. Sometimes a get a downer after 30 min, so I'm trying to see whether I should get off the bike for a bit or just go at a lighter pace. That's still in the trial stages.

  18. #18
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    18,453
    A mile and a half off-road probably takes long enough for a decent warmup. If you perceived your ride as better, it was. It was probably also quantitatively better, but who cares.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  19. #19
    Trailhead Poseur
    Reputation: jjaguar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    506
    That's basically all I do. My home trailhead is about a half mile of pavement from my front door, and the technical trails don't start until after a mile and a half of mostly smooth doubletrack. I ride all that at an easy to moderate pace and I'm good to go by the time the real riding starts. Likewise, I use the ride home as a cooldown.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: s0ckeyeus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    3,313
    I just hit the trails right away.

  21. #21
    Wyld Paq
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    9
    I always eat a banana or some type of fruit before I leave. Then after arriving at the trail I will ride for about 10 minutes to get my muscles warm, after this I stretch and I'm good to go!!

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    11
    Best thing to do i just do a couple of small laps, like most trails have nice little carparks at the start, just do a couple of lap round. Just dont go mental otherwise your going to pull something.

Similar Threads

  1. My Walt Works - what should I do?
    By Rontele in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-12-2010, 07:36 PM
  2. 2010 S Works Epic or Stumpjumper FSR
    By Pete N in forum Specialized
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 10-22-2009, 04:58 PM
  3. works red finish without the works
    By gsxrawd in forum Intense
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 02-21-2009, 11:18 PM
  4. Intense SS frame - Works Med & Works Sm - $1,452
    By Stumpy_Steve in forum Intense
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 02-19-2009, 04:46 PM
  5. S Works Epic/S Works Stumpy Comparison
    By Pete N in forum Specialized
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 01-08-2009, 06:43 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.